Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Website

Leadership

Thomas F. Madden,
     Director, CMRS, and Graduate Program Coordinator
Steven A. Schoenig, S.J.,
     Associate Director, CMRS, and Undergraduate Program Coordinator

Overview

The Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies supports, coordinates, and promotes the extraordinary array of scholars, students, and resources devoted to medieval and early modern research at Saint Louis University.

One of the largest resources of its kind in the country, the center is home to more than 50 full-time faculty members. By supporting students, conferences, speakers, fellowships, library acquisitions, and professorships, the center enriches the intellectual environment for medievalists and early modernists on campus and across the region.

It combines the resources of the University's departments of English, fine and performing arts, history, philosophy, theological studies, and languages, literatures and cultures, a collaboration built upon the collections of the Vatican Film Library and the rare book collection.

The center offers an undergraduate major, an undergraduate minor and a graduate concentration in medieval studies. In addition, the center sponsors lectures, seminars, conferences, workshops and research opportunities both on campus and through the Newberry Library Consortium.

Each year, the center brings a wide range of scholars to campus to use the extensive collections in the Pius XII Memorial Library under the auspices of the NEH Research Fellowship Program. The center’s director and affiliated faculty are available to help students fashion independent programs of study and research within the context of their major departments.

Affiliated Faculty

Richard Amelung, Ph.D., Omer Poos Law Library 
Douglas R. Boin, Ph.D., Department of History
Simone Bregni, Ph.D., Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
Susan Brower-Toland, Ph.D., Department of Philosophy 
Debra Cashion, Ph.D., Pius XII Memorial Library 
Ron Crown, D.Phil., Pius XII Memorial Library
Anthony Daly, S.J., Ph.D., Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
John Doyle, Ph.D., Department of Philosophy 
Mary Dunn, Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies 
Ruth Evans, Ph.D., Department of English 
Thomas Finan, Ph.D., Department of History 
Cathleen Fleck, Ph.D., Department of Fine and Performing Arts 
Philip Gavitt, Ph.D., Department of History 
James Ginther, Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies 
Claire Gilbert, Ph.D., Department of History 
Jay Hammond, Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies
Christine F. Harper, Ph.D., Pius XII Memorial Library 
Joan Hart-Hasler, Ph.D., Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Anthony Hasler, Ph.D., Department of English 
Steven Hawkes-Teeples, S.J., S.E.O.D., Department of Theological Studies
J. A. Wayne Hellmann, O.F.M. Conv., Department of Theological Studies 
Michael Kriz, Pius XII Memorial Library
Atria Larson, Ph.D., Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies 
Susan L'Engle, Ph.D., Pius XII Memorial Library 
Julia Lieberman, Ph.D., Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Kathleen Llewellyn, Ph.D., Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Jennifer J. Lowe, Pius XII Memorial Library
Thomas F. Madden, Ph.D., Department of History 
Jack Marler, Ph.D., Department of Philosophy
Filippo Marsili, Ph.D., Department of History
Peter W. Martens, Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies 
Colleen McCluskey, Ph.D., Department of Philosophy 
John McEwan, Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies
David Meconi, S.J., Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies
Evelyn Meyer, Ph.D., Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Clarence Miller, Ph.D., Department of English
Nathaniel Millett, Ph.D., Department of History
Fabien Montcher, Ph.D., Department of History
Ana Montero, Ph.D., Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Kate Moriarty, Pius XII Memorial Library
Wynne Moskop, Ph.D., Department of Political Science
David Murphy, Ph.D., Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
William P. O'Brien, S.J., D. es lettres, Department of Theological Studies 
Tomas O'Sullivan, Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies 
Charles H. Parker, Ph.D., Department of History 
Kenneth Parker, Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies
Gregory A. Pass, Ph.D., Pius XII Memorial Library 
Claude Pavur, S. J., Ph.D., Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
Scott Ragland, Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies
John Renard, Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies 
Albert Rotola, S.J., Ph.D., Department of Fine and Performing Arts 
Jennifer Rust, Ph.D., Department of English 
Jonathan Sawday, Ph.D., Department of English 
Steven A. Schoenig, S.J., Ph.D., Department of History 
Thomas Shippey, Ph.D., Department of English
Damian Smith, Ph.D., Department of History 
Kenneth Steinhauser, Th.D., Department of Theological Studies
Cynthia Stollhans, Ph.D., Department of Fine and Performing Arts
Donald Stump, Ph.D., Department of English
Eleonore Stump, Ph.D., Department of Philosophy
Warren Treadgold, Ph.D., Department of History
Sara van den Berg, Ph.D., Department of English
Jeffrey T. Wickes, Ph.D., Department of Theological Studies 

Emeritus Faculty

James Hitchcock, Ph.D.
John Waide

MDVL 2100 - The Medieval World

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This introduction to life in the Middle Ages (400-1500) in the West and to the field of Medieval Studies examines the experience and achievements of medieval people from multiple perspectives. Drawing on many different disciplines, including history, literature, art, philosophy, theology, and archaeology, this course offers a general overview of medieval culture, as embodied in its values and customs, its ideas and institutions. Class activities include discussions of medieval texts and artifacts, guest lectures from medievalists on their areas of expertise, field trips to sites of medieval interest, and introductory surveys of relevant topics, from manuscripts to heraldry, cathedrals to crusades. These activities also illustrate the techniques of the professional medievalist.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-Elective

MDVL 4910 - Medieval Studies Internship

Credit(s): 1-6 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This internship, which serves as a possible capstone to the Medieval Studies major, entails 110-120 hours of work with a non-SLU entity (e.g., St. Louis Art Museum) on a particular project throughout the academic term. Consult with Undergraduate Director of Medieval Studies prior to registration.

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a minor in Medieval Studies.

MDVL 4960 - Medieval Synthesis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This capstone to the Medieval Studies program provides an opportunity for the student to integrate previous coursework in the various medieval disciplines. The focus is on the research and writing of a paper on a medieval topic approached from an interdisciplinary point of view, under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

MR 3910 - Internship

Credit(s): 1-6 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

MR 3930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

MR 3980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)