School of Social Work

Leadership

Noelle E. Fearn, Ph.D.
     Associate Dean and Director, School of Social Work
Sarah Coffin, Ph.D., ACIP
     Director, Urban Planning and Development Program
Shannon Cooper-Sadlo, Ph.D., M.S.W., LCSW
     Director, Bachelor of Arts in Criminology and Criminal Justice Program
     Director, Bachelor of Science in Social Work Program
Jami C. Curley, Ph.D., M.S.W. 
     Director, Master of Social Work Program
Joseph Schafer, Ph.D.
     Director, Master of Arts in Criminology and Criminal Justice Program
Michael G. Vaughn, Ph.D.
     Director, Doctoral Program
Natalie Parks, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA
     Director, Applied Behavioral Analysis Programs

Overview

The Saint Louis University School of Social Work was formed in 1930 and is currently housed within the College for Public Health and Social Justice. It has been continually accredited since 1933 and is currently accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Built upon an unwavering commitment to social justice, the school is a leader in integrating social work practice and education with faculty members who have made substantial contributions to the profession.

Interactive teaching methods integrate community‐based practice with classroom activities and discussions. Small class sizes facilitate an atmosphere of intellectual dialogue that fosters relationships between students and faculty.

Saint Louis University's School of Social Work is ranked in the top 20% of social work programs nationally by U.S. News & World Report.

Accreditation

The baccalaureate social work program at Saint Louis University has been continuously accredited since 1974.
 
The master of social work program at Saint Louis University has been continuously accredited since 1930.

Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)
1701 Duke Street, Suite 200
Alexandria, VA 22314-3457
Phone: 703-683-8080 

Applied Behavior Analysis

Heather Lewis, M.S.W., BCBA
Natalie Parks, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA

Criminology and Criminal Justice

Kenya Brumfield-Young, M.L.S., MSCJ
Joseph Schafer, Ph.D.
Noelle Fearn, Ph.D.

Social Work

Beth S. Barrett, M.S.W., LCSW
Marla Berg-Weger, Ph.D., M.S.W., LCSW
Julie Birkenmaier, Ph.D., M.S.W., LCSW
Gabriel Carrillo, M.S.W.
Shannon Cooper-Sadlo, Ph.D., M.S.W., LCSW
Jami Curley, Ph.D., M.S.W.
Jesse Helton, Ph.D.
Jin Huang, Ph.D., M.S.W.
Pamela J. Huggins, M.S.W., LCSW
Donald Linhorst, Ph.D., M.S.W., ACSW
Michael Mancini, Ph.D., M.S.W.
Monica Matthieu, Ph.D., M.S.W., LCSW
Brandy Maynard, Ph.D., M.S.W.
Stephen Edward McMillin, Ph.D., M.S.W.
Vithya Murugan, Ph.D., M.S.W.
Sabrina W. Tyuse, Ph.D., M.S.W.
Michael Vaughn, Ph.D.
Cara Wallace, Ph.D., M.S.W.

Urban Planning and Development

Sarah Coffin, Ph.D., ACIP
Robert Lewis, FACIP, CDcD
 

ABA 2930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

ABA 2939 - Violence, Crime & Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

ABA 3010 - Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to applied behavior analysis. Applied behavior analysis is a field dedicated to the scientific application of behavioral principles and procedures to socially relevant problems. During this course, students learn the causes of behavior. Students will also learn about basic principles and procedures, such as reinforcement, punishment, and functional assessment. In addition, we will cover particular content areas including behavioral medicine, behavioral gerontology, drug and alcohol abuse, classroom management, developmental disabilities, and applications in business and industry. Cross-listed with PSY 4730.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1010

ABA 3930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

ABA 3980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

ABA 4930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

ABA 5001 - Supervision and Organizational Behavior Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course builds upon the basic principles of learning and applied behavior analysis presented during previous courses in the Applied Behavior Analysis program curriculum. This course develops students understanding of evidenced-based strategies for supervision, organizational behavior management, group contingencies and meta-contingencies, and influencing behavioral change of employees and staff working with clients/consumers of behavior analytic services. Course content supports the social work value of social justice, as it relates to provisions of professional services to persons with disabilities. (Offered in Summer)

Restrictions:

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5002 - Philosophy of Behavioral Science

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course builds upon the basic principles of learning and applied behavior analysis presented during previous courses in the Applied Behavior Analysis curriculum. This course will highlight the philosophical underpinnings of behavioral science, including Radical Behaviorism, and how the application of such theoretical principles can impact individuals, groups, and macro-level social systems (e.g., government, religious institutions, etc). Concomitantly, the course will focus on verbal behavior and derived relational responding across phylogenic, ontogenetic, and cultural levels of analyses. The goal of the course is to refine students’ conceptual knowledge of the science of human behavior generally, and as it relates to aspects of social systems (including verbal behavior). At the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate understanding of Radical Behaviorism, behavioral approaches to verbal behavior, and how behavioral science can address societal problems. (Offered in Fall)

ABA 5115 - Advanced Clinical Research and Practice Seminar IV

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This two-part course seeks to assist students with advancing their clinical skills learned during practicum I-III, by integrating research into their practice. Students will actively apply research-based techniques and theoretical perspectives during clinical practice, according to professional and ethical standards. Advanced practice experiences will include: conducting functional analyses; designing, implementing, and monitoring advanced and complex behavioral change programs; overseeing implementation of behavioral change programs by others; participating in behavioral program planning meetings; conducting behavior analytic principles and concepts in novel settings, environments, and/or populations. Course material will prepare students for working in the professions of behavior analysis and social work for Board Certification in Applied Behavior Analysis. Course content supports the ethical principles of social justice to provide professional services to persons with disabilities. (Offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer)

Prerequisite(s): ABA 5820; ABA 5826; ABA 5827; ABA 5828; ABA 5830; ABA 5840

Corequisite(s): ABA 5116

ABA 5116 - Practicum IV

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Students will learn to integrate knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis on applied behavioral analysis. Offered Fall, Spring, and Summer)

Prerequisite(s): ABA 5820; ABA 5826; ABA 5827; ABA 5828; ABA 5830; ABA 5840

Corequisite(s): ABA 5115

ABA 5117 - Advanced Clinical Research Competency Seminar V

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This two-part course seeks to assist students with advancing their clinical skills learned during practicum I-III, by integrating research into their practice. Students will actively apply research-based techniques and theoretical perspectives during clinical practice, according to professional and ethical standards. Advanced practice experiences will include: conducting functional analyses; designing, implementing, and monitoring advanced and complex behavioral change programs; overseeing implementation of behavioral change programs by others; participating in behavioral program planning meetings; conducting behavior analytic principles and concepts in novel settings, environments, and/or populations. Course material will prepare students for working in the professions of behavior analysis and social work for Board Certification in Applied Behavior Analysis. Course content supports the ethical principles of social justice to provide professional services to persons with disabilities. (Offered Fall, Spring, and Summer)

Prerequisite(s): ABA 5820; ABA 5826; ABA 5827; ABA 5828; ABA 5830; ABA 5840; ABA 5115; ABA 5116

Corequisite(s): ABA 5118

ABA 5118 - Practicum V

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Students will learn to integrate knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis on applied behavioral analysis. (Offered Fall, Spring, and Summer)

Prerequisite(s): ABA 5820; ABA 5826; ABA 5827; ABA 5828; ABA 5830; ABA 5840; ABA 5115; ABA 5116

Corequisite(s): ABA 5117

ABA 5746 - Principles & Concepts in Behavior Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will familiarize students with behavior analysis fundamental philosophical assumptions, and the basic concepts and principles of operant and respondent conditioning. The course will review some of the basic laboratory research that has illuminated the principles of behavior. The material covered in this course will contribute to preparing students working in the field of behavior analysis and related fields for board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5747 - Behavioral Assessment

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This is a graduate course that will develop student’s basic knowledge about behavioral assessment methods and intervention selection in the field of applied behavior analysis. This course will review some of the basic assumptions and characteristics that define the field. The material covered in this course will prepare students working in the field of behavior analysis/related field and for board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis. Course content supports the social work value of social justice to provide professional services to all individuals requiring behavioral interventions. (Offered in Spring)

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5748 - Behavior Change and Process

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will expand basic knowledge of students with respect to behavior analysis fundamental concepts, principles and philosophical assumptions including basic behavioral principles of operant and respondent conditioning, stimulus control, and develop a working understanding of these principles in behavior change strategies and interventions in the field of applied behavior analysis. This course will review some of the fundamental applied literature that has demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral strategies and continues to define the field. The material covered in this course will contribute to preparing students working in the field of behavior analysis and related fields for board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5749 - Behavior Change and Ethics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will familiarize students with the ethical issues confronting those working in behavior analytic or related capacity. Students will learn the ethical responsibilities inherent to working in their chosen field. Ethical codes and cases will be analyzed. Topics will include gaining informed consent, protection of confidentiality, selection of the least intrusive behavior change methods and procedures, and protection of individual rights. The ethical standards addressed in this course will prepare students working in the field of behavior analysis or related fields for board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis. Cross-listed with SWRK 5749.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5774 - Measurement & Experimental Design

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will develop basic knowledge of students with respect to single subject research design, measurement and application of the empirical approach to evaluation of effectiveness of interventions in the field of applied behavior analysis. This course will review some of the basic assumptions and characteristics that define the field. The material covered in this course will contribute to preparing students working in the field of behavior analysis and related fields for board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5820 - ABA Integrative Seminar I

Credit(s): 0-1 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This is a three part graduate level course (three seminars) that will ensure that students are able to successfully complete all three ABA practica. Students will understand and apply professional and ethical behavior analysis service in clinical contexts by conducting behavioral interventions, designing, implementing and monitoring behavior change programs and, review empirical literature pertinent to those change efforts.

Corequisite(s): ABA 5826

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5826 - Practicum I

Credit(s): 2 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Students will learn to integrate knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis on applied behavioral analysis.

Corequisite(s): ABA 5820

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5827 - Practicum II

Credit(s): 2 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Students will continue to learn and to integrate knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis in applied behavioral analysis.

Prerequisite(s): ABA 5826

Corequisite(s): ABA 5830

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5828 - Practicum III

Credit(s): 2 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Students will continue to learn and to integrate knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis in applied behavioral analysis.

Prerequisite(s): ABA 5827

Corequisite(s): ABA 5840

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5830 - ABA Integrative Seminar II

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Prerequisite(s): ABA 5820

Corequisite(s): ABA 5827

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5840 - ABA Integrative Seminar III

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Prerequisite(s): ABA 5830

Corequisite(s): ABA 5828

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

ABA 5931 - Special Topics in Applied Behavior Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course builds upon basic principles of learning and applied behavior analysis presented during previous courses in the Behavior Analysis course structure. The course will offer advanced coverage of special topics, including: Clinical practice, Autism, and Organizational Behavior Management. Clinical behavior analysis focuses on the use of verbally based interventions to treat persons in outpatient/clinical settings. In behavior analysis and autism we will review diagnostic criteria and evidence based practices. The Organizational Behavior Management section of the course will provide an overview of contemporary research and practice in the field.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

ABA 5932 - Special Topics II in Applied Behavior Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

ABA 5980 - Independent Studies

Credit(s): 0-3 Credits

Restrictions:

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

ABA 5990 - Thesis Research

Credit(s): 0-4 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Students will conduct original research and begin to write a thesis that reflects independent thought and thorough knowledge of applied behavior analysis. (Offered Fall, Spring, and Summer)

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Appld Behaviorl Analysis, PMC Appld Behvr Analysis or PMC Appld Behvr Analysis (Web) programs.

Students in the Madrid, Spain campus may not enroll.

CCJ 1010 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course serves to introduce students to the three main components of the criminal justice system: the police, courts, and corrections. Topical coverage in this course includes: background information of definitions/classification of offenses, crime data, and victims and offenders; police organization, roles, functions, and responsibilities; court organization, processes, and outcomes; and, punishment issues such as probation, jail, prison, and community corrections.

CCJ 1930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

CCJ 2050 - Multiculturalism for Criminal Justice Professionals

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This class examines what is expected of professionals in a multicultural world and prepares tomorrow’s professionals for the opportunities of a multicultural workplace. This class will explore legal, ethical and practical considerations related to race, biological sex, gender, sexual orientation, social class and other elements of difference. It will also help students to understand their own biases, both explicit and implicit and to prevent such biases from becoming actualized as discrimination in the workplace and beyond. Emphasis will be placed on cross-cultural communication/understanding and sensitizing students to how social and demographic factors influence the lived experience of those they encounter as professionals. (Offered occasionally)

Attributes: BHS-Professional, Urban Poverty - Applied

CCJ 2051 - Multiculturalism for Professionals

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This class examines what is expected of professionals in a multicultural world and prepares tomorrow’s professionals for the opportunities of a multicultural workplace. This class explores legal, ethical and practical considerations related to race, biological sex, gender, sexual orientation, social class, culture and other elements of difference. It helps students to understand their own biases, both explicit and implicit and to prevent such biases from becoming actualized as discrimination in the workplace and beyond. Emphasis will be placed on cross-cultural communication/understanding and sensitizing students to how social and demographic factors influence the lived experience of those they encounter as professionals. Students may not take both CCJ 2051 – 01: Multiculturalism for Professionals and CCJ 2050 – 01: Multiculturalism for CJ Professionals for credit.

CCJ 2150 - Criminology: Nature of Crime

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the various theories of criminal offending. Particular attention is paid to both the individual and the contextual level factors that contribute to or facilitate propensities toward criminal behaviors. Through the course materials, lectures, and discussions, students will begin to understand the nature of crime.

Attributes: BHS-Professional

CCJ 2200 - Policing & Society

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the role that police plays in contemporary society. The topics covered include the history and organization of the police, patrol and other activities, police community relations, police culture, police discretion, and legal issues in policing.

CCJ 2250 - Institutional & Community Corrections

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course serves to introduce students to major contemporary issues in both institutional and community corrections in the United States. Topics covered include detention, sentencing, intermediate sanctions, adult institutions, probation, parole, and correctional staffing and personnel issues. The procedures, practices, and personnel involved are also examined. Students will learn about the wide array of effective punishments and treatment programs that constitute alternatives to incarceration, and which are designed to meet the level of risk posed by, and the need of, each individual. These include probation, parole, electronic monitoring, house arrest, day-treatment centers, boot camps, restitution, fines and more.

Attributes: Urban Poverty - Exclusion, Diversity in the US (A&S)

CCJ 2930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

<br>BIOLOGY OF EVIL<br/>Do the darkest parts of our nature have a biological component? Criminology, as a discipline, has been dominated by sociological theories of antisocial behavior that have argued against a biological component to adverse human outcomes. The end result of this dominance is that generations of criminology students are taught that social processes and environmental influences are paramount in explaining variation in criminal behavior. At the same time, evolutionary and genetic explanations of antisocial behavior have largely been censored from the discipline. Findings from biology, evolutionary psychology, behavioral genetics, molecular genetics, and neuroscience, however, have converged to show that every human behavior, prosocial, antisocial and criminal, is influenced (to varying degrees) by genetic factors. This course is design to make you fluent in what has been termed by the psychologist Steven Pinker as the new sciences of human nature.

CCJ 2939 - Violence, Crime & Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

CCJ 2980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

CCJ 3100 - Juvenile Justice & Delinquency

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of juvenile justice and delinquency. Particular emphasis is placed on the decision-making processes of police, courts and correction officials, charged with the apprehension and processing of juvenile offenders. This course also surveys youth crime and delinquent behavior. Particular focus is placed on individual and social factors contributing to such behavior; notable crime/delinquency causation theories; and the prevention, control, and treatment of youth offending. An assessment of efforts directed at the prevention and control of delinquency and the rehabilitation of juvenile offenders is made in light of major theoretical perspectives on delinquency.

Attributes: Urban Poverty - Exclusion

CCJ 3150 - Contemporary Theories of Crime

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course builds on the material covered in CCJ-2150, Introduction to Criminology, by concentrating on developments in theories of crime in the latter part of the 20th century and into the new millennium. Special attention will be paid to integrated, developmental, and life course theories. The course will include a service learning dimension that places students in community agencies that work with offenders or with individuals who live in high-risk environments so that students develop a more personal understanding of the human side of crime and justice.

Attributes: BHS-Professional

CCJ 3200 - Ethics in Criminal Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The primary objective of this course is to familiarize students with the major ethical themes and debates in criminal justice. Accordingly, the research, both empirical and theoretical (normative), that has been conducted with regard to policing, courts, and corrections (as well as a number of particular ethical issues) will be the major focus of the course discussions. In the end, students should not only be familiar with the broad conceptual debates and controversies surrounding criminal justice alternatives, but should also have a firm understanding of the different ways in which ethical evaluations of those alternatives are made.

Attributes: BHS-Professional, Urban Poverty - Exclusion

CCJ 3300 - Corporate & White Collar Crime

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course presents information on the various types, causes, and measurement of white-collar/corporate criminal offenses. Students will understand and consider the competing theories currently used to explain white-collar/corporate criminality as well as explore the use of a myriad of criminal punishments to prevent/deter corporate and personal misconduct and sanction this kind of behavior should it occur. The course also provides illustrations of different key cases along with their financial and social costs.

CCJ 3350 - Understanding Serial Killers

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the phenomenon of serial killers in both theory and practice. The course also examines the extent to which criminological theory can explain observed behavior in serial killers. In this course we will also scrutinize how law enforcement deals with serial killers and how law enforcement can optimize the chances of apprehension through the application of modern and conventional investigative techniques.

CCJ 3400 - Victimology & Victimization

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the study of victims of crime. Course materials cover a broad variety of victim-related topics, including: perspectives on and explanations of victimization, various patterns of victimization, social characteristics of victims, victims’ roles in criminal offending, victims’ treatment by criminal justice decision makers (e.g., police, attorneys, judges), and efforts designed to reduce to the various consequences associated with being a crime victim.

CCJ 3401 - American Incarceration

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course uses history, literature, theory, and popular cultural sources to explore incarceration in the United States. Topics may include religion, disability, juvenile justice, race, class, sexuality, and gender. Prior Course Description: Using history, social theory, film, fiction and autobiography, the course surveys the cultural history of incarceration in America, and examines the place of incarceration in American culture.

Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

CCJ 3450 - Gender, Sexuality, and the Criminal Justice System

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is explores the important intersectional relationship between gender/sexuality and the criminal justice system. This course also examines the ciscender women’s place in the criminal justice system and that of the LGBTQIA+ community. This course incorporates feminist approaches to criminology and approaches from Queer Criminology, a theoretical and practical approach that looks to highlight and draw attention to the stigmatization, the criminalization, and in many ways the rejection of the Queer community, which is to say the LGBTQIA+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) population, as both victims and offenders, by academe and the criminal legal system. (Offered in Spring)

CCJ 3500 - Race, Ethnicity, and the Criminal Justice System

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will examine the distribution of crime within subgroups in American society and the role of criminological theory and empirical evidence in the explanations of criminality. The course will provide students the opportunity to critically assess the nature of the association between race/ethnicity and justice. Using an experiential learning model, students will participate in service learning in the St. Louis metropolitan area to understand how social conditions may also contribute to the associations between race/ethnicity and crime. Through this interactive learning method students will explore the facts and fiction of the nexus between race and crime.

Attributes: Urban Poverty - Exclusion

CCJ 3550 - The Science of Evil

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Do the darkest parts of our nature have a biological component? Criminology, as a discipline, has been dominated by sociological theories of antisocial behavior that have argued against a biological component to adverse human outcomes. The end result of this dominance is that generations of criminology students are taught that social processes and environmental influences are paramount in explaining variation in criminal behavior. At the same time, evolutionary and genetic explanations of antisocial behavior have largely been censored from the discipline. Findings from biology, evolutionary psychology, behavioral genetics, molecular genetics, and neuroscience, however, have converged to show that every human behavior, prosocial, antisocial and criminal, is influenced (to varying degrees) by genetic factors. This course is designed to make you fluent in what has been termed by the psychologist Steven Pinker as the new sciences of human nature. (Offered occasionally)

Attributes: BHS-Professional

CCJ 3600 - Mental Health & Crime

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Mental Health & Crime: This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the issues and challenges located at the intersection of mental health/illness and the criminal justice system. Attention will be focused on a range of issues, including, but not limited to, the definition of mental illness, deinstitutionalization and the criminalization of the mentally ill, the impact of mental illness on criminal proceedings, treatment/intervention effectiveness, and the reentry/reintegration of mentally ill individuals.

Attributes: BHS-Professional

CCJ 3700 - Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides the fundamental information, skills, and understanding necessary for undergraduate students to digest, comprehend, and critique the basic methodological and statistical information that they will most likely confront in their future studies and current/future professions. Specific attention is paid to providing the knowledge base necessary to critically read and review substantive research articles, evaluation reports, and government documents pervasive in criminology and criminal justice professions. (Offered in Fall)

Prerequisite(s): Minimum Earned Credits of 60

CCJ 3750 - Statistics in Criminology and Criminal Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course serves to introduce students to the quantitative skills, methods, and techniques necessary for analyzing the implementation and impact of programs and policies, specifically those related to criminology and criminal justice. Students will learn the vocabulary associated with scientific thinking and research, data collection, data analysis, data presentation, and interpretation and discussion of analytical results. This is an introductory course in quantitative statistical analysis that covers the properties/characteristics and distributions of data and variables particularly relevant to CCJ as well as both descriptive and inferential statistical approaches to analyzing research questions. (Offered in Spring)

CCJ 3800 - Violence Against Women

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course focuses on the causes, effects, and institutional responses to several types of gender-based violence, including sexual assault, intimate partner violence, sexual harassment, and sex trafficking. Includes examination of the psychological, legal, sociological, and political discourse surrounding these issues.

CCJ 3930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

CCJ 3980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

CCJ 4050 - Criminal Law & Procedure

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides students with a basic understanding of substantive and procedural criminal law. Understanding criminal law and procedure is fundamental to understanding how our courts operate as well as understanding the legal constraints under which law enforcement and correctional personnel must operate. The course lays a foundation for understanding how evidence is used in the prosecution of criminal offenses.

CCJ 4150 - Criminal Investigations

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This class is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the criminal investigation process. Students will learn how to properly conduct an investigation, specifically, how to properly secure a crime scene, how to properly document investigative efforts (e.g., sketch, model, and photograph a crime scenes), how to properly search a scene, how to conduct effective interviews, interrogations, and surveillances, and how to handle informants and conduct undercover work. Emphasis will be placed on understanding why proper criminal investigative techniques are so important, ethics in investigations, and how to prepare a credible and winnable case for the prosecution.

CCJ 4600 - Mentored Research in CCJ

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course provides students with an opportunity to work with and assist a faculty member in an ongoing research project. The course requirements are tailored to the specific dimensions of the research project on which the student collaborates. These opportunities can include literature reviews, data entry and analysis, survey administration, or any other assigned task that allows the student to partner with a faculty member to learn, through a hands-on approach, the process of conducting a research project. The course requires completion of CCJ 2000.

CCJ 4910 - Criminology and Criminal Justice Internship

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable up to 6 credits)

This undergraduate criminology/criminal justice internship course provides students with an opportunity to learn about and experience the criminal and/or juvenile justice systems from the inside. Students will work with criminal/juvenile justice practitioners to understand the workings of various justice agencies. As an experiential course students are required to commit at least 100 hours to the agency they select. Students are also required to complete assigned readings and submit written work - including an internship journal and an essay. Offered fall, spring and summer.

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Criminology Criminal Justice or Criminology Criminal Justice.

CCJ 4915 - Externship in CCJ

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

The course is designed to allow students an opportunity to immerse themselves in local communities and organizations, particularly those working with disadvantaged communities in order to understand the human side of living in risk – especially since high-risk conditions (e.g., poverty, residential instability, racial segregation, etc.) are associated with higher rates of officially reported criminal offending. Students are challenged to examine the consequences of environmental stressors on populations and what that might mean to and for justice systems. The course combines the academic experience with Ignatian principles of experience and reflection, in order to gain self-awareness critical to criminal justice practice.

CCJ 4930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

CCJ 4960 - Criminology and Criminal Justice Capstone

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course analyzes the various actors in the criminal justice system, their decision making processes, and the policies they create and implement. The course offers an integrative framework for understanding the policies emanating from the criminal justice system. This final course provides an opportunity to integrate key concepts of criminology/criminal justice in a specific area of interest. Capstone projects are expected to demonstrate competence in critical thinking, inquiry skills, and the synthesis of knowledge through the development and presentation of an examination of a particular CCJ policy, program, and/or initiative.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the BA Criminology Crim Justice or BA Criminology Criminal Just programs.

CCJ 4980 - Independent Study in CCJ

Credit(s): 1-6 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

The course provides students with an opportunity to develop their own research project that will be completed independently under their own initiative. The student will receive guidance and support of the assigned faculty member. The course requires prior approval of the faculty member and completion of a contract of agreement on products to be delivered and method of evaluating course/project outcomes.

CCJ 5000 - Criminological Theory

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the role of criminological theory in the development of criminal justice policy. Theories examined include both macro and micro level theories that influence strategies for deploying justice personnel and developing treatment strategies. The course includes a focus on the importance of theory for the allocation of resources, identification of promising strategies for prevention and intervention, justice program success, for criminological theory organizes the way scholars and practitioners observe and explain delinquent and criminal behavior. Theories of crime also help explain how and why the justice system should respond and set policy for addressing criminal behavior.

CCJ 5100 - Ethics in the Administration of Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course familiarizes students with the major ethical themes and debates in criminology and criminal justice. Through analysis of empirical and theoretical research that has been conducted with regard to policing, courts, and corrections (as well as a number of particular ethical issues) students will gain the knowledge necessary to identify, understand, evaluate, and respond appropriately to ethically-challenging circumstances they are likely to encounter as criminal justice professionals. Upon completion of the class, students will be familiar with the broad conceptual debates and controversies surrounding criminology and criminal justice options and alternatives and will have a comprehensive understanding of the different ways in which ethical evaluations of those options and alternatives are made. (Offered occasionally)

CCJ 5200 - Research Methods

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides the fundamental information, skills, and understanding necessary for graduate students to digest, comprehend, and critique the basic methodological and statistical information that they will most likely confront in their future studies and current/future professions. Specific attention is paid to providing the knowledge base necessary to critically read and review substantive research articles, evaluation reports, and government documents pervasive in criminology and criminal justice professions.

CCJ 5300 - Foundations of Criminal Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides students with a foundational exploration of the nature and scope of the criminal justice process. Topics considered will include policing, prosecution, the court system, the correction system, and juvenile justice, as well as policy implications associated with criminal justice in America. The operations and behavior of the criminal justice system are assessed in the context of major theoretical, historical, and organizational influences found in the field.

CCJ 5910 - Criminology and Criminal Justice Internship

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable up to 6 credits)

This graduate level criminology/criminal justice internship course provides students with an opportunity to learn about and experience the criminal and/or juvenile justice systems from the inside. Students will work with criminal/juvenile justice practitioners to understand the workings of various justice agencies. As an experiential course students are required to commit at least 150 hours to the agency they select. Students are also required to complete assigned readings and submit written work - including an internship journal and a program/policy proposal paper. Offered fall, spring and summer.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MS Criminology Prof Practice program.

CCJ 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

CCJ 5980 - Independent Study in CCJ

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

CCJ 5990 - Thesis Research

Credit(s): 0-6 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Thesis Research.

CCJ 6000 - Issues in Policing

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive examination of policing in the United States. It will examine the origins and history of policing and the current state of knowledge surrounding police organizations, police subculture, police behavior, police-community relations, and methods of controlling police behavior and misconduct. The course will ultimately provide students with a critical and contextual understanding of the evolution of policing, the functions of policing in contemporary society, and the future of policing in America.

CCJ 6100 - Issues in Corrections

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This is an advanced seminar in corrections aimed at graduate (MS) students. This course examines both institutional as well as community corrections although the emphasis--as in real life--is placed on incarceration. Students will read (and think) extensively on timely issues surrounding contemporary corrections including: prisons, jails, probation and parole, inmate perspectives, institutional misconduct/disorder/violence, rehabilitation/treatment programming, gender, family-related concerns, and reentry. Thus, this course provides a broad foundation of information on US corrections today. (Offered occasionally)

CCJ 6200 - Issues in Juvenile Justice Administration

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course examines the roots of the juvenile court and its associated institutions, issues in its administration, and current issues and challenges to its functioning. From its inception in 1899 the juvenile justice system represented a unique legal institution. By design it is a system of individualized justice. The nature of the juvenile system makes administering it a challenge. The juvenile justice system must hold youth accountable for delinquent behavior while crafting individualized treatment plans. As an open system it is further pressed by the desires of external constituencies that seek retribution and punishment which are at times in opposition to individualized care.

CCJ 6400 - Issues in Jurisprudence

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides students with a working knowledge of how the courts operate and fit within our democracy. Students will gain an understanding of the parameters of Constitutional guarantees including the Due Process Clause, the Equal Protection Clause and various guarantees contained in the Bill of Rights and how the judiciary effectuates those rights. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding how the Constitution impacts upon the operation of the law enforcement and correctional components of the criminal justice system. Sources of civil and criminal civil rights liability will be explored with an emphasis on best practices to avoid and minimize risk of liability. In addition, students will gain the tools to meaningfully access, understand and evaluate legal materials, particularly case law and statutory law. (Offered occasionally)

CCJ 6930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

CCJ 6980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

SWRK 1000 - Introduction to Social Work

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Overview of the Social Work profession which includes values, history, fields of practice, issues of social welfare, social justice and vulnerable populations. Current controversies, future trends and career opportunities are explored.

Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

SWRK 2000 - Research Methods in SWRK

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the scientific method, the philosophy and goals of science, and a detailed study of qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Topics covered include: research design, conceptualization, operationalization, measurement issues, sampling types and procedures, surveys and other data collection instruments, experimental research approaches, qualitative approaches, and evaluation research techniques.

SWRK 2100 - Human Behavior & the Social Environment

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to theories, bodies of knowledge, and perspectives which provide critical insight into the behavior of individuals. The critical perspective will be used to analyze and integrate the various theories of human development within the values and social justice orientation of social work.

Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

SWRK 2200 - Human Development Through the Life Span

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to human growth and development from prenatal life through old age, according to a variety of theoretical perspectives. It includes theories and knowledge of biological, psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual aspects of human life across the life span.

SWRK 2300 - Human Behavior Social Envrnmnt

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to theories, bodies of knowledge, and perspectives which provide critical insight into the behavior of individuals and the dynamics of social systems, and the person in environment. The systems approach, symbolic interaction/social constructionism, and life cycle theory serve as the major theoretical perspectives employed to analyze interaction in the system levels through time. The system levels identified as having the greatest salience are the individual, family, group, organization and community. The critical perspective is used to integrate theories and knowledge within the value and social justice orientation of social work.

SWRK 2930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

SWRK 2939 - Violence, Crime & Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

SWRK 2980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

SWRK 3100 - Social Policy for Social Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The study of social policy and its resultant social welfare system is viewed as a study of the choices which a society makes in satisfying human needs, pursuing social justice, and attaining human goals. This course examines social policy within the context of its historical development, its current functions within contemporary society, and introduces student to the relationship between social policy and social work practice. The course examines the substance of policy choices, the values and beliefs that underlie these choices, the political process through which the choices are made, and the potential roles of social workers in that process.

Attributes: BHS-Professional, Social Science Req (A&S), Urban Poverty - Exclusion

SWRK 3200 - Dismantling Oppression: Exploring Equity & Inclusion

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course is an examination of social justice activities that seek to expose barriers created towards a realization of a more equal and just society, The focus is on differences and similarities in the experiences, needs and beliefs of people and includes perspectives on discrimination and oppression based on race, gender, class, age, sexual orientation, ethnicity, mental and physical disability, and/or spiritual orientation. This course focuses on human diversity within the context of anti-oppression framework in social work. Course also addresses how group membership affects access to resources, services and opportunities and relates to risk factors for specific population groups. (Offered in Fall) Cross-listed with AAM 3270.

Attributes: African American Studies, BHS-Professional, Social Science Req (A&S), Urban Poverty - Exclusion, Diversity in the US (A&S)

SWRK 3300 - Social Work Practice with Individuals

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This is the first of three courses in the practice sequence, in which students are introduced to the competencies relevant to generalist social work practice and oral and written communication skills. Using the individual as the client system, this course provides a foundation in skills, theories and methods of generalist practice that can be built upon in the other practice courses and will also emphasize interviewing, engagement, assessment, intervention, evaluation and termination.

Restrictions:

Students with a classification of Freshman may not enroll.

SWRK 3400 - Social Work Practice with Families & Groups

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Building upon the skills developed in SWRK-3300 (Social Work Practice with Individuals), the focus of SWRK-3400 (Social Work Practice with families and Groups) will be to expand those skills into work with famio8ies and groups. Specific theories and interventions associate with families and groups will be introduced. New skills relating to families and groups will be developed.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum Earned Credits of 60

SWRK 3500 - Social Work Practice with Organizations & Communities

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course utilizes a generalist practice perspective on values, knowledge and skills within a systems framework for planned change with a particular focus on work with populations of special concern to social work. Groups experiencing social and economic injustices based on racial, ethnic, socio-cultural, and gender characteristics are of special concern in this course. Students will learn skills related to maintaining and influencing organizations, community organizing and community development.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum Earned Credits of 60

SWRK 3600 - Financial Capability and Asset Building Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course provides an introduction to the field of financial capability and asset building practice. Financial capability and asset building practice includes content about poverty, personal household finance, financial access, and related economic concepts.Discussion is focused on economic and financial concepts as related individuals and families across the life cycle and communities, with special attention to oppressed populations and communities experiencing poverty and near-poverty. Social policy and policy change efforts related to these areas are also examined.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum Earned Credits of 60

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a program in Social Work.

SWRK 3700 - Introduction to Social Work Research

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Concepts central to empirical research and their application. Methods and techniques of research; the relationship between research, social work practice, and practice evaluation.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum Earned Credits of 60

SWRK 3930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-4 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

SWRK 3980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1-6 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Prior approval must be obtained from the undergraduate program director and from a faculty member who agrees to supervise the student in the independent study.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a classification of Junior or Senior.

SWRK 4000 - Practicum Planning

Credit(s): 0 Credits

Pre/Co-requisites: SWRK 3300 or SWRK 3400 or SWRK 3500.

SWRK 4100 - Social Work Practicum I

Credit(s): 5 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Students assigned responsibility for work with individuals, groups and communities in various social work sites under professional supervision.

Prerequisite(s): (SWRK 3300, SWRK 3400, or SWRK 3500); SWRK 1000

Corequisite(s): SWRK 4150

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a classification of Junior or Senior.

Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Social Work.

SWRK 4150 - Integrative Practice Seminar I

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This seminar is designed to facilitate the integration of the content of social work courses with the anticipated job demands of social work practice. It will address some of the practical questions and problems faced by students in the course of their practicum placements. Co-requisite: SWRK 4100. Must be Junior or Senior to enroll.

Corequisite(s): SWRK 4100

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a classification of Junior or Senior.

Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Social Work.

SWRK 4200 - Social Work Practicum II

Credit(s): 5 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Continuation of SWRK-4100.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 4100; SWRK 4150

Corequisite(s): SWRK 4250

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a classification of Senior.

Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Social Work.

SWRK 4250 - Integrative Practice Seminar II

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Continuation of SWRK-4150.

Corequisite(s): SWRK 4200

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a classification of Senior.

Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Social Work.

SWRK 4930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-4 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

SWRK 4980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1-6 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Prior approval must be obtained from the undergraduate program director and from a faculty member who agrees to supervise the student in the independent study.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a classification of Junior or Senior.

SWRK 5001 - Supervision and Organizational Behavior Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course builds upon the basic principles of learning and applied behavior analysis presented during previous courses in the Applied Behavior Analysis program curriculum. This course develops students understanding of evidenced-based strategies for supervision, organizational behavior management, group contingencies and meta-contingencies, and influencing behavioral change of employees and staff working with clients/consumers of behavior analytic services. Course content supports the social work value of social justice, as it relates to provisions of professional services to persons with disabilities. (Offered in Summer)

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Applied Behavioral Analysis.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5002 - Philosophy of Behavioral Science

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course builds upon the basic principles of learning and applied behavior analysis presented during previous courses in the Applied Behavior Analysis curriculum. This course will highlight the philosophical underpinnings of behavioral science, including Radical Behaviorism, and how the application of such theoretical principles can impact individuals, groups, and macro-level social systems (e.g., government, religious institutions, etc). Concomitantly, the course will focus on verbal behavior and derived relational responding across phylogenic, ontogenetic, and cultural levels of analyses. The goal of the course is to refine students’ conceptual knowledge of the science of human behavior generally, and as it relates to aspects of social systems (including verbal behavior). At the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate understanding of Radical Behaviorism, behavioral approaches to verbal behavior, and how behavioral science can address societal problems. (Offered in Fall)

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Applied Behavioral Analysis.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5010 - Mission and Practice of Global Public Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the context of public health practice, including its legal basis, history, mission, the core functions of public health, the institutional structure of public health practice. Theoretical and practical perspectives are presented to illustrate the workings of public health at local, state, national, and global levels. (Offered in Summer)

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5320 - Sentencing Mitigation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This interdisciplinary class, comprised of both law and social work students, explores the role of sentencing advocacy in state and federal sentencing systems, the factors that influence its quality, and the insights from social scientists that can critique and improve it. The class will introduce the students to several guest speakers (defense lawyers, prosecutors, judges, social scientists and mitigation specialists) who will put the role and quality of sentencing advocacy in perspective. Most significantly, students will learn themselves, through hands-on involvement in actual cases, how to strategize, research, and develop an effective sentencing memorandum.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5700 - Values & Ethics in Social Work

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is a comprehensive review of the values and ethical dimensions of social work practice.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5819 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5841 with a grade of S or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5701 - Social Justice: Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course is designed to help students understand the meaning of social justice and community building, within the context of social work practice. Based on social work's historical mission of intervention in high risk communities while advocating for social reform, this course is aimed at teaching students the history, theory and practice realities of community building locally and globally through discussion, research, and exploration. The norms and values that support the characteristics of a just society will be stressed. Students will learn to compare and contrast current social and economic conditions with the values and norms underlying a just society as a structure for critically analyzing situations. Students will gain knowledge of models and procedures for community organizing for social justice. Learning will take place as we focus on groups experiencing social and economic injustices based on racial, ethnic, socio-cultural, gender, and other characteristics. Offered in spring.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5702 - Social Policy

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course focuses on social policy within the context of its historical development and its current functions within contemporary society. It examines the substance of policy choices, the values and beliefs that underlie these choices, the political process through which the choices are made, and the potential roles of social workers in that process.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5703 - International Social Work

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

These courses are offered in a rotation in the summer session or January intercession. Section 04-The Ghana Experience-This is a two week experiential course in Ghana, West Africa, which features concentrated study, lectures, and interactions with the people of Ghana. The course involves an in-depth examination of global, social, and economic issues of development; and explores the agencies, elements, and patterns of responses used to address hunger, health care, education and other issues impacting the people of developing countries. Section 05-Resources and Distributive Justice Issues in India-The program is divided into two settings, urban and rural. In approximately half the course, students will study urban issues through lectures and fieldwork in Mumbai. In the second half of the course, students will examine rural issues in the same format in Dahanu. The program content includes Indian political, social and economic history and current social and environmental issues. Fieldwork in both settings provide students with practical hands-on experience.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5705 - Practice in Global Issues

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with a working foundation for social work and public health practice in a global context. It is intended for students preparing to go on their international practicum or internship or those who are interested in working in a country other than their own. While this course is not intended to be a prerequisite for SWRK 5703, it is highly encouraged. (Offered every Spring)

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5707 - Policy Practice for Social Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

In this course, students will gain leadership skills to effectively advocate for social policy and economic justice. Course content will prepare students to use a range of tools and skills to effectively change or enhance societal structures. Social work skills in policy practice with oppressed and vulnerable groups will be explored in the student’s area of concentration.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5714 - Interprofessional Perspectives in Geriatric Care

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Interprofessional approaches that address the medical, social, instrumental and functional issues and needs of older adults will be examined. Information about interprofessional geriatric practice and social issues affecting the well-being of older adults will be provided. Clinical, theoretical, and educational perspectives will be presented by interprofessional faculty and professionals with expertise in geriatric assessment and intervention. Students will attend two 2-hour classes on TBD at Tegeler Hall and the 3rd International Cognitive Stimulation Therapy Conference and the SLU Summer Geriatric Institute as a group. (Offered in Summer)

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5715 - Practice with Families & Communities Experiencing Poverty

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to examine the needs of families and communities of all sizes that are struggling with poverty. A variety of poverty reduction models are examined to develop an understanding of multilevel assessment and practice interventions focused on empowering families and communities. Patterns of social and economic injustices that result in the inequitable distribution of resources and opportunities are also examined.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5716 - Dismantling Oppression: Exploring Equity & Inclusion

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course is an examination of social justice activities that seek to expose barriers created towards a realization of a more equal and just society, The focus is on differences and similarities in the experiences, needs and beliefs of people and includes perspectives on discrimination and oppression based on race, gender, class, age, sexual orientation, ethnicity, mental and physical disability, and/or spiritual orientation. This course focuses on human diversity within the context of anti-oppression framework in social work. Course also addresses how group membership affects access to resources, services and opportunities and relates to risk factors for specific population groups. (Offered in Fall)

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5720 - School Social Work

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides the student with the basic knowledge and skills needed by the school social worker. Content includes the historical development of school social work; education and special education laws and mandates; school social work processes including referrals and assessments; and the social work roles of clinician, broker, advocate, educator, consultant and researcher in the school.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5721 - Community Theory & Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

In this course, students gain advanced knowledge and skills for community practice. Course content focuses on theories of community and social systems as well as practice theories emphasizing social change, empowerment, and promotion of social and economic justice for culturally diverse and at-risk communities. The roles of community organizer, community developer, and social planner are emphasized in this course.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5722 - Supervision and Management in Health and Human Service Organizations

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course develops the knowledge, values, skills, and critical thinking processes necessary for anticipating leadership and supervision opportunities in health and social service organizations. Students will critically analyze what is involved in management and administrative supervision as well as in providing ongoing reflective supervision to other clinicians. Key components of this course include how to create and shape spaces for supervision and reflective practice as well as using theory and putting theory into practice in administrative, clinical, and reflective supervision. Students will explore best practices for new, interim, or recently promoted supervisors as well as ways and approaches to institutionalize best practices across administrative, clinical, and reflective supervision. (Offered in Spring)

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725* with a grade of C or higher; SWRK 5750* with a grade of C or higher; SWRK 5751* with a grade of C or higher; SWRK 5787* with a grade of C or higher; SWRK 5702* with a grade of C or higher

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

SWRK 5725 - Human Behavior & the Social Environment

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to theories, knowledge, and perspectives which explain the behavior of individuals and social systems. The theories are the basis of social work practice.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5729 - Social Work in Corrections

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course presents the issues and trends within adult and juvenile corrections. This course will assess adult and juvenile correctional systems, including jails and prisons, probation, parole, and alternatives to incarceration. Treatment of substance abuse, health problems, and mental illness are examined within the context of correctional settings and offender populations.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5731 - Fall Inter-Professional Team Seminar

Credit(s): 0 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with a learning experience focused upon client system centered care as members of an interprofessional team. The purpose of the team will be to provide education, consultation, and/or direct care for medically underserved individuals/families using an interprofessional plan of care. The interprofessional team will identify a pertinent health-related issue with their chosen population. They will cooperate, collaborate, communicate, and integrate in order to provide a holistic approach to care. Each professional will use his or her knowledge and expertise to maximize the productivity of the interprofessional team to improve health outcomes. Seminars will provide opportunities for students to discuss and reflect on how service activities express the professional obligation to work as change agents for a more just society. Registration and attendance in one Fall section of Saint Louis University’s Inter-Professional Team Seminar is required for all MSW students in the Clinical concentration.

SWRK 5732 - Spring Inter-Professional Team Seminar

Credit(s): 0 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course is designed to provide students with a learning experience focused upon client system centered care as members of an interprofessional team. The purpose of the team will be to provide education, consultation, and/or direct care for medically underserved individuals/families using an interprofessional plan of care. The interprofessional team will identify a pertinent health-related issue with their chosen population. They will cooperate, collaborate, communicate, and integrate in order to provide a holistic approach to care. Each professional will use his or her knowledge and expertise to maximize the productivity of the interprofessional team to improve health outcomes. Seminars will provide opportunities for students to discuss and reflect on how service activities express the professional obligation to work as change agents for a more just society. Registration and attendance in one Spring section of Saint Louis University’s Inter-Professional Team Seminar is required for all MSW students in the Clinical concentration.

SWRK 5733 - Advanced Social Work Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

​Students will learn the practice skills needed to effectively integrate services, care, and support for individuals and families facing health, mental health and substance use problems. Building on students’ foundational knowledge of general practice skills this course will emphasize practice and implementation of approaches designed to enhance effective communication, consumer engagement, motivation and empowerment with clients as a member of a collaborative inter-professional team. Through the use of case vignettes, role-plays, and small group activities students will gain experience and skills necessary to be effective in a variety of roles in integrated physical and behavioral health care settings. This is a Concentration Core Course for MSW students in the Clinical concentration.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5842* with a grade of S or higher

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5734 - Human Behavior & the Social Environment Part II

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores theories of human behavior as it relates to health, illness, disability, diversity, and environmental factors. ​​This is a Concentration Core Course for MSW students in the Clinical concentration.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5735 - Complementary Approaches to Healing in Social Work Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces the student to alternative and complementary schools of thought in medicine, including allopathic, anthroposophic, ayurvedic, Chinese, chiropractic, homeopathic, naturopathic, and osteopathic approaches to healing.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5742 - Evidence Based Practices in Community Mental Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course focuses on a person-centered, recovery-oriented and evidence-based framework for social work practice with individuals diagnosed with psychiatric disabilities and/or substance use disorders. Students develop skills in the assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning and intervention of major psychiatric and substance use disorders. The nature and diagnosis of psychopathology and the ethical integration of the DSM into clinical social work practice is critically analyzed. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the complex nature of co-occurring medical, mental health and substance use disorders and in the integration of a range of evidence-based interventions in the area of mental health and substance use practice.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5734*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5744 - Substance Use Disorder Interventions

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The overall goal of the course is to increase student knowledge about alcohol and drug abuse/dependency and the recovery process. This course surveys the theoretical, practice, policy, and research literature that deal with the etiology, dynamics, treatment, and prevention of substance use disorders in contemporary U.S. society. The view conveyed in this course is that substance use and abuse, its causes, its effects, and its remedies are extremely broad, systemic, multi-level, and multivariate.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5745 - Health & Mental Health Interventions with Older Adults

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores skills and competencies needed to effectively work with older adults and their families. It provides an overview of health and mental health issues with an emphasis on holistic and systemic assessments and social work practice interventions. The environmental, psychosocial, biological and spiritual influences on health and mental health are highlighted. Clinical, programmatic and policy interventions known to promote healthy behaviors are discussed. Attention is paid to social justice, ethics and the law, particularly as it relates to economic deprivation and oppression leading to the inequitable distribution of health services to older adults.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5746 - Principles & Concepts in Applied Behavior Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course familiarizes students with the fundamental concepts and principles and philosophical assumptions of behavior analysis as well as the basic concepts of operant and respondent conditioning. Students review some of the basic laboratory research that has illuminated the principles of behavior. The material covered contributes to prepare students to work in the field of behavior analysis and related fields for board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis. Course content supports the social work value of social justice to provide professional services to persons with disabilities. Cross-listed with ABA 5746.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5747 - Behavioral Assessment

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This is a graduate course that will develop student’s basic knowledge about behavioral assessment methods and intervention selection in the field of applied behavior analysis. This course will review some of the basic assumptions and characteristics that define the field. The material covered in this course will prepare students working in the field of behavior analysis/related field and for board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis. Course content supports the social work value of social justice to provide professional services to all individuals requiring behavioral interventions. (Offered in Spring) Cross-listed with ABA 5747.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Applied Behavioral Analysis.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5748 - Behavior Change & Processes in Applied Behavior Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course expands students’ basic knowledge with respect to behavior analysis fundamental concepts and principles and philosophical assumptions including the basic behavioral principles of operant and respondent conditioning. This course develops students working understanding of the use of these principles in behavior change strategies and interventions in the field of applied behavior analysis. Students review some of the fundamental applied literature that demonstrates the efficacy of behavioral strategies and that continue to define the field. The material covered prepares students for work in the field of behavior analysis/related field and for board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis. Course content supports the social work value of social justice to provide professional services to persons with disabilities. Cross-listed with ABA 5748.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5749 - Behavior Change & Ethics in Applied Behavior Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course familiarizes students with the ethical issues confronting those working in a behavior analytic (or related) capacity. Students learn the ethical responsibilities inherent to working in their chosen field. Ethical codes and cases are analyzed. Topics include gaining informed consent, protecting confidentiality, selection of the least intrusive behavior change methods and procedures, and protecting individual rights. The ethical standards prepare students for work in the field of behavior analysis/related field and for board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis. Course content supports the social work value of social justice to provide professional services to persons with disabilities.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5750 - Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families, & Groups

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course prepares students to apply a generalist perspective and systems framework to direct social work practice with individuals, families, and groups. This course emphasizes the basics of communication, interviewing, relationship building, and professional use of self, skills essential to effective social work assessment, intervention and evaluation. Theories and practice skills related to social work with individuals, families, and groups will be the primary focus.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5751 - Social Work Practice with Communities & Organizations

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course prepares student to apply a generalist perspective and systems framework to social work practice with communities and organizations as well as task/problem-solving groups within larger systems and settings.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5752 - Co-Occurring Disorder Counseling

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Students in this course will achieve competence in the theory and techniques of assessment and stage-appropriate treatment of persons with substance use and co-occurring disorders. (Offered every Fall)

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5755 - Social Work Practice in the Health Field

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides the framework for social work practice in the health care field. This course will cover the array of social work practice approaches and nature of interdisciplinary practice in various health settings such as clinics, hospice, skilled nursing care, and hospitals.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5756 - Clinical & Public Health Approaches to Working with Veterans

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to assist students, current practitioners, administrators, evaluators, and policy makers to understand the basic orientation, clinical approaches, and public health strategies that are effective in providing health and mental health care to Veterans. This course is to understand how to implement and use the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Department of Defense (DoD) evidence best practices and programs for the assessment and management of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Substance Use Disorders (SUD), and for the prevention of suicide. A central focus of the course is on measurement based care, thus we will review the epidemiology, risk factors, and clinical assessment and measurement of mental health and co-occurring conditions in the Veteran populations. Additionally, we will apply this data using the evidence based tools and consensus guidelines developed specifically by and for use in the VA/DoD health care systems with case vignettes on various Veteran populations.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5757 - Foundations of Family Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course involves a survey of the family practice field in its epistemology, cultural influences, and models of practice. The course strives to integrate theoretical ideas into an understanding of practice applications, including methods and techniques. Students will integrate the general systems approach with family practice models in social work settings. Content will include both historical and present-day family practice models.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5758 - Clinical Approaches to Chronic Health Conditions

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Students will learn the medical, psychosocial, spiritual and functional aspects of chronic physical illness and disability in order to thoroughly assess the impact on patients, families and larger systems. Evidence-based psychosocial interventions for specific chronic health conditions will be presented.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5755

SWRK 5760 - Behavioral Interventions with Children & Adolescents

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Using a systems framework, viewing the child in environment, this course teaches students behavioral learning theories for work with children who have a wide range of challenging behaviors. These practice skills are essential for working with children in schools, residential treatment, juvenile justice system, foster care, outpatient psychiatric case management, etc. Students will learn to educate, consult, and collaborate with families and/or caregivers in the use of these methods.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5761 - Evidence-Based Practice with Children & Youth

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This advanced clinical practice course in the Clinical Concentration builds upon the foundation level practice course and prepares students for direct social work practice with children and youth across child serving, behavioral health and integrated settings.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5762 - Diagnosis & Assessment in Clinical Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to assist in the development of skills related to the diagnosis and assessment of psychopathology. Issues related to the etiology of psychopathology and the historical construction and development of diagnostic categories will be assessed. Special emphasis will be placed on the exploration, understanding and critical analysis of the nature and diagnosis of psychopathology and the integration of the DSM-IV-TR into clinical social work practice. While students will develop skills in the ethical use of the DSM-IV-TR in their practice, they will at the same time critically analyze the nature of clinical diagnosis as it relates to issues of gender, culture, age, sexual orientation, political power and socioeconomic status. Ethical issues to the integration of the DSM-IV-TR will be explored and the relationship between psychiatry and social work will be analyzed. Students will be challenged develop solutions to the paradigmatic and ethical dilemmas associated with the use of the medical model and psychiatric diagnosis within the profession of social work.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5764 - Child, Youth & Family Services & Policies

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides social work knowledge and skills directed toward helping children and families involved with social service systems due to child abuse and neglect and other risk factors. The course will address issues of abuse, neglect, foster care, adoption, family treatment models, and case management.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5771 - Intimate Partner Violence

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The focus of the course is on ways to reduce the incidence and impact of intimate partner violence. Students address and examine the theoretical understandings for violence against women and other intimate partner violence as well as the need for direct services, community organizing, and public policy changes that will help end intimate partner violence.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5772 - Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Work Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Students in this course will learn basic knowledge and skills of cognitive-behavior therapy as they relate to stage-appropriate assessment and treatment of persons with co-occurring mental illness and substance use issues. These skills will include developing a therapeutic alliance, problem formulation, assessment of maladaptive thoughts and schemas, cognitive restructuring, exposure therapy, development of various coping skills and relapse prevention. Students will learn how to integrate other treatment approaches such as harm reduction, motivational interviewing, and mindfulness with cognitive-behavioral approaches in order to assist people to achieve and maintain therapeutic goals.

Prerequisite(s): (SWRK 5725, SWRK 5702, SWRK 5750, and SWRK 5751); (SWRK 5831* with a grade of S or higher, SWRK 5841* with a grade of S or higher, or SWRK 5821* with a grade of S or higher)

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5773 - Approaches to Trauma Care

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This is an introduction to the study of trauma ranging from violence, natural disasters, child abuse and other forms of traumatic experience and its impact on client populations served in the field of social work. The implications of trauma are explored through various theoretical frameworks and assessment practices that address the biological, psychological, sociological and spiritual effects on individuals, families and communities. Theories and models of crisis intervention are presented, as well as their application in clinical practice with survivors of violent events and natural disasters. Students also examine and develop skills necessary to utilize evidence- based treatments with specific populations.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5762*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5774 - Measurement & Experimental Design in Applied Behavior Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course develops students basic knowledge related to single subject research design, measurement and application of the empirical approach to evaluation of effectiveness of interventions in the field of applied behavior analysis. Students review some of the basic assumptions and characteristics that define the field. The material covered prepares students for work in the field of behavior analysis/related field and for board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis. Course content supports the social work value of social justice to provide professional services to persons with disabilities. Cross-listed with ABA 5774.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5775 - Advanced Social Work Practice in Trauma with Children & Youth

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the common concepts (general theory and foundational knowledge), which informs evidence-based assessment and intervention with traumatized children and adolescents. Strength-based practice will be highlighted along with a focus on the identification of protective and promotive factors that foster resiliency and post-traumatic growth. Trauma is broadly defined and includes children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events including, but not limited to natural disasters, war, abuse and neglect, medical trauma, and witnessing interpersonal crime (e.g. domestic violence) and other traumatic events. The course will highlight the role of development, culture and empirical evidence in trauma-specific interventions with children, adolescents and their families. It will address the level of functioning of primary care giving environments and assess the capacity of the community to facilitate restorative processes.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5773

SWRK 5776 - Advanced Social Work Practice in Trauma with Adults

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the common concepts (general theory and foundational knowledge), which informs evidence-based assessment and intervention with traumatized adults. Strength-based practice will be highlighted along with a focus on the identification of protective and promotive factors that foster resiliency and post-traumatic growth. Trauma is broadly defined, and includes adults exposed to traumatic events such as natural disasters, war, child abuse and neglect, sexual trauma, surviving life threatening accidents/injuries, and witnessing interpersonal crime (e.g. domestic violence), etc. The course will highlight the role of age, culture and empirical evidence in trauma-specific interventions with adults, with a specific emphasis on trauma treatment for Veterans in VA primary and specialty care settings (e.g. Prolonged Exposure, Cognitive Processing Therapy.)

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5773

SWRK 5777 - Advanced Clinical Family Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to help you develop knowledge and skills about various approaches to family practice from a social work perspective. An examination of the basic theoretical assumptions underlying family systems approaches and the practice principles that evolved from them is offered. An exploration of evidence-based practices and the application of these practices with various populations will be a focus of this course. An important aspect of the course is a consideration of the ramifications for social justice and other social work values and ethics from a family systems perspective. (Offered every Spring)

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5757

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the Public Health Social Justice college.

SWRK 5778 - Motivational Interviewing

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Students in this course will learn the theory and skills of motivational interviewing as they relate to stage-appropriate assessment and treatment of persons with co-occurring health, mental health and substance use issues. These skills will include: (1) using empathy and the skills of open ended questioning, affirmation, reflective listening and summarizing to develop discrepancies between behaviors and goals; (2) rolling with resistance; (3) eliciting, recognizing and reinforcing change talk; and (4) negotiating a change plan. Students will learn how to integrate motivational interviewing with assessment and treatment planning skills as well as other relevant interventions such as harm reduction, medication, and cognitive-behavioral approaches in order to assist people in achieving and maintaining therapeutic goals.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5784 - Evaluation of Social Work Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

The course is designed to equip social work students with the knowledge and skills to engage in effective social work practice evaluation. Students will learn to identify and apply a variety of evaluation methods and use theoretical and conceptual models to assess processes and outcomes of practice with individuals, families, groups, organization and communities to advance practice, policy and service delivery. Offered in spring.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5787 with a grade of C or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5785 - Organizational & Program Planning

Credit(s): 3 Credits

In this course, students are introduced to the basic conceptual and methodological principles and skills necessary for planning practice in human service organizations. Students examine the role of strategic and operational planning in charting the future of a well-run, human service organization. They acquire an appreciation for and critical perspective on the interconnectedness of organization and environment, anticipating trends, considering social change, needs and social problems, and planning for resource utilization, programmatic response and assessing program impact. Particular attention is given to the essential elements of designing a response to be used in requests for proposals and grant applications.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5786 - Death, Dying, & Grief: Professional Practice & Self-Awareness

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores the physical, psychological, spiritual, emotional, and sociocultural concerns typically encountered by clients and families confronted with dying, death, and grief. Course content will include personal death awareness, the integration of theoretical perspectives, and evidence-based practice interventions. Throughout this course, students will be encouraged to examine their own values and attitudes concerning issues related to death and grief and how these will impact their professional practice.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5787 - Research for Evidence-Informed Research Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course is designed to equip social work students with the knowledge and skills to engage in evidence-informed practice. Students will learn the steps of the evidence-based practice process and engage in evaluation and interpretation of the best available evidence to answer social work practice and policy questions. This will require the development of an understanding of quantitative and qualitative research methods appropriate for answering policy and practice questions. This also requires the application of that knowledge to make policy and practice decisions. The course is built around systematic review methodologies, including question formulation, evidence search, critically appraising studies and reviews, and selecting and implementing interventions. Students will engage not only social work research, but multi-disciplinary evidence that informs practice derives from multiple ways of knowing. (Offered in Spring)

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5788 - Research Methods II

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course is designed to equip social work students with the knowledge and skills to engage in effective research at the programmatic, policy, and direct levels of practice. It is the second in a 2 course sequence. Research Methods II focuses on executing the fundamentals of empirical research. It nurtures the students' ability to evaluate social work services, human service programs and/ or social and public policies in order to improve them. The course accentuates the application of optimal methodologies and techniques necessary to examine the impact of services with clients, to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of human service programs and to investigate the efficacy of social and public policies. Students should emerge from the course able to execute an applied research project including refining a research study; collecting, managing, analyzing data; and report writing. The course culminates in a completed research project.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5787 with a grade of C or higher

SWRK 5790 - Feminist Approaches to Social Work Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course is designed to clarify feminist issues and to illustrate how a feminist perspective in social work practice can facilitate individual and social change. Characteristics, values, techniques and areas of feminist practice are explored and distinguished from other theoretical models. Cross-listed with WGST 6790.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5797 - Financial Capability and Asset Building Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course examines the role of social work within financial capability practice. This course focuses on financial literacy, financial education initiatives, and financial empowerment practices for individuals and families across the life cycle and communities. Social policy and policy change efforts related to these areas are also examined. Special attention is given to oppressed populations and communities experiencing poverty and near-poverty.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5798 - Introduction to Non-Profit Organization Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the roles of the nonprofit sector and nonprofit organizations in contemporary society. The role of nonprofit organizations as vehicles for citizen participation and as commercial enterprises will be highlighted. The challenges facing nonprofit organizations in contemporary society will also be analyzed.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5799 - Social Entrepreneurship

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the concept and practice of social entrepreneurship. It reviews the historic and contemporary approaches to and models of social entrepreneurship. It explores the range of issues and challenges associated with social entrepreneurship. Particular attention will be given to microenterprise, venture philanthropy, social venture capitalism, social return on investment and business planning for social enterprises.

Prerequisite(s): (SWRK 5725, SWRK 5702, SWRK 5750, and SWRK 5751); (SWRK 5721 or SWRK 5785)

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5808 - Social Work, Education, & Individuals with Exceptionality

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides the student with a working knowledge of the learning, psychological, cognitive and social characteristics of youth and children with exceptionality. Current methods of practice within the educational setting, interventions, strategies, and modifications for use within the general education classroom are examined.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5819 - Foundation Integrative Practice Seminar

Credit(s): 1 Credit (Repeatable for credit)

This seminar is designed to provide opportunities for students to integrate foundation and a generalist perspective of social work theories, methods, values, and ethics with practicum experiences. Additionally the seminar will focus on maximizing learning experiences in the student’s practicum and in gaining knowledge of other target populations and social service settings. Students will gain skills in peer consultation and support, case presentation, researching for practice-based literature, and in approaching various practicum challenges.

Prerequisite(s): (SWRK 5750, SWRK 5702*, SWRK 5725*, and SWRK 5751*); (SWRK 5841* or SWRK 5821*)

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the Public Health Social Justice college.

SWRK 5820 - Integrative Practice Seminar

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This seminar provides an opportunity for students in the first Concentration Practicum SWRK-5822 Practicum II, to integrate theoretical constructs and information gained in the classroom with the application of social work practice. The seminars are designed to provide additional integration of coursework and daily practice; enhance a student's knowledge and skill base through peer sharing; and provide a supportive opportunity for students to debrief on practice challenges.

Prerequisite(s): (SWRK 5822* with a grade of S or higher, SWRK 5832* with a grade of S or higher, or SWRK 5842* with a grade of S or higher); SWRK 5819

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the Public Health Social Justice college.

SWRK 5821 - MSW/ABA Foundation Practicum

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Must be taken within the first 30 hours of enrollment in the program. The foundation practicum requires students to have a generalist perspective social work experience with micro, mezzo, and macro activities. This practicum consists of 240 hours in the field. Must take in first 18 hours.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5702*, SWRK 5725*, SWRK 5751*, and SWRK 5750

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Corequisite(s): SWRK 5819

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Applied Behavioral Analysis.

SWRK 5822 - Applied Behavior Analysis Practicum I

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Students will learn to integrate knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis on their area of concentration. This practicum consists of 240 hours in the field.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5819 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5821 with a grade of S or higher

Corequisite(s): SWRK 5820

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Applied Behavioral Analysis.

SWRK 5823 - Applied Behavior Analysis Practicum II

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Students will continue to build on their knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis on their area of concentration. This practicum consists of 240 hours in the field.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5820 with a grade of C or higher; SWRK 5822 with a grade of S or higher

Corequisite(s): SWRK 5830

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Applied Behavioral Analysis.

SWRK 5824 - Applied Behavior Analysis Practicum III

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Students will continue to build on their knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis on their area of concentration. This practicum consists of 240 hours in the field.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5823 with a grade of S or higher; SWRK 5830 with a grade of S or higher

Corequisite(s): SWRK 5840

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Applied Behavioral Analysis.

SWRK 5828 - Fund-raising for Non-Profit Organizations

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course focuses on the cycle, stages and progression of fund development for formal, nonprofit organizations and grassroots associations. It introduces the concept of advancement, development, relationships and cultivation for nonprofit organizations. It emphasizes the importance of developing relationships within and matched to the stages and activities of institutional advancement and development.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

SWRK 5830 - ABA Integrative Practice Seminar II

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This is the second part of a three-part graduate level course (three seminars) that will ensure that students are able to successfully complete all three ABA practica. Students will understand and apply professional and ethical behavior analysis service in clinical contexts by conducting behavioral interventions, designing, implementing and monitoring behavior change programs and, reviewing empirical literature pertinent to those change efforts.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5820 with a grade of C or higher; SWRK 5822 with a grade of S or higher

Corequisite(s): SWRK 5823

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Applied Behavioral Analysis.

SWRK 5832 - Community & Organization Practicum I

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Students will learn to integrate knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis on their area of concentration. This practicum consists of 300 hours in the field.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5819 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5841 with a grade of S or higher

Corequisite(s): SWRK 5820

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Community Organization.

SWRK 5833 - Community & Organization Practicum II

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Students will continue to build on their knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis on their area of concentration. This practicum consists of 300 hours in the field.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5820 with a grade of C or higher; SWRK 5832 with a grade of S or higher

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Community Organization.

SWRK 5840 - ABA Integrative Practice Seminar III

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This is the third part of a three-part graduate level course (three seminars) that will ensure that students are able to successfully complete all three ABA practica. Students will understand and apply professional and ethical behavior analysis service in clinical contexts by conducting behavioral interventions, designing, implementing and monitoring behavior change programs and, reviewing empirical literature pertinent to those change efforts.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5830 with a grade of S or higher; SWRK 5823 with a grade of S or higher

Corequisite(s): SWRK 5824

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Applied Behavioral Analysis.

SWRK 5841 - Master of Social Work Foundation Practicum

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Must be taken within the first 30 hours of enrollment in the program. The foundation practicum requires students to have a generalist perspective social work experience with micro, mezzo, and macro activities. This practicum consists of 300 hours in the field. ?Prerequisites: Foundation courses. SWRK students in the ABA concentration should register for SWRK 5821. * Must take in first 18 hours *

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5702*, SWRK 5725*, SWRK 5750, and SWRK 5751*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Corequisite(s): SWRK 5819

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Clinical or Community Organization.

Enrollment limited to students in the Public Health Social Justice college.

SWRK 5842 - Clinical Practicum I

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Clinical students will learn to integrate knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis on their area of concentration. This practicum consists of 300 hours in the field.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5819 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5841 with a grade of S or higher

Corequisite(s): SWRK 5820

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Clinical.

SWRK 5843 - Clinical Practicum II

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Students will continue to build on their knowledge, values, and skills to develop a professional level of practice with specific emphasis on their area of concentration. This practicum consists of 300 hours in the field.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5842 with a grade of S or higher; SWRK 5820 with a grade of C or higher

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a concentration in Clinical.

SWRK 5844 - Elective Practicum IV

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This elective provides additional practicum experience in an area of special interest to the student.

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5819 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5841 with a grade of S or higher

SWRK 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5931 - Professional Practice Institute

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Prerequisite(s): SWRK 5725 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5702 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5750 with a grade of B or higher; SWRK 5751 with a grade of B or higher

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 5971 - Social Work & Pharmacology

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the mechanisms of action, side effects, major drug interactions, and therapeutic uses of major classes of drugs. The role of social workers in medication management will also be addressed, particularly the skills needed to effectively collaborate with clients, families, and other health providers on medication-related issues. Special consideration will be given to the medication needs of special populations, including persons with mental illness, children, pregnant women, elderly persons and racial/ethnic minorities, as well as prescription drug abuse, over-the-counter medications and herbal remedies.

SWRK 5980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This offers students the opportunity for individual and independent study of a particular area related to social work theory or practice. Prior approvals by the student's academic advisor, Director of the MSW Program, and faculty member directing and evaluating the study are required.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Elective

SWRK 6000 - Foundations of Theory Development in Social Work

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This required course is designed to equip doctoral students with the knowledge and skills to engage in effective theory development and synthesis. The course considers some of the major historical currents in the philosophy of science that undergirds contemporary scientific research and accentuates emerging ideas in science that cross-cut traditional boundaries. The course culminates in a theoretical synthesis paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. (Offered every fall)

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the PhD Social Work program.

SWRK 6010 - Principles of Statistics & Data Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This required course serves to introduce doctoral students to the quantitative skills, methods, and techniques necessary for scientific analysis, particularly in the social and behavioral sciences. Students will learn the vocabulary associated with scientific thinking and research, data collection, data analysis, data presentation, and interpretation and discussion of analytical results. Students will also be introduced to STATA, the statistical software program that will be used in subsequent analytical courses. This introduction will include instruction on data entry, data manipulation, and conducting basic data analysis and interpretation of results. (Offered every fall)

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the PhD Social Work program.

SWRK 6020 - Research Design & Measurement

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to equip social work PhD students with the knowledge and skills to engage in effective descriptive, explanatory, and intervention research. The course accentuates the application of optimal methodologies and measurement techniques vis-a-vis a particular research question or study objectives. It focuses on conceptualizing and designing a research project culminating in a research proposal. (Offered every spring.)

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the PhD Social Work program.

SWRK 6030 - Multivariate Data Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This required course is the second of two required courses on quantitative analyses for doctoral students at the School of Social Work. The course is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to apply linear regression to empirical social work research. In the course students will learn the concepts of regression, simple regression, multivariate regression, regression diagnostics, and the goodness of fit. The course also involves categorical predictors, transformation of variables, collinearity, variable selection, and generalized linear models. A list of topics is provided in the course schedule. (Offered every Spring)

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the PhD Social Work program.

SWRK 6040 - Research Area Synthesis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The purpose of the research area synthesis (RAS) is for the student to demonstrate sufficient command of an area of research and advance a body of knowledge. This is achieved by independently completing an extended review paper (e.g., 50-75 double spaced pages) critically appraises and synthesizes the research literature on a particular topic. The result of this document shall include an assessment of major theories or perspectives, key findings, research design assets and limitations, and measurement issues, and development of a future research agenda. Limited to Ph.D. program in social work students who are in their final semester of coursework.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the PhD Social Work program.

SWRK 6930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-4 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

SWRK 6980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the PhD Social Work program.

SWRK 6990 - Dissertation

Credit(s): 0-12 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

The ability to extend the knowledge base in Social Work is a qualification distinctive to the doctoral degree. A candidate for this most advanced, earned degree must present substantial evidence of this ability by presenting and defending a piece of original and independent research on a topic of importance that has been previously unresolved within the major field. This is perhaps the most valuable stage in doctoral training.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the PhD Social Work program.

UPD 2930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

UPD 2939 - Violence, Crime & Justice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

UPD 3930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

UPD 4930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

UPD 5000 - Foundations of Planning

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the incoming planning students with the foundational concepts important to planning education and practice. It will explore the historical underpinnings of cities and city life that reveal why and how modern planning practice came into play. In doing so, students will also examine land use, transportation, economic analysis, housing, the role of government in planning, community-based plans, citizen-led planning and how contemporary planning can be shaped by poverty, race, and social class. Students will learn first-hand how to do field work within a community and additionally experience the role that consensus building plays in group decision making through a semester-long neighborhood-based group project. Offered every fall.

UPD 5010 - Planning & Development Theory

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores the literature on planning and development theories. We will examine several themes: 1) historical foundations and justifications of urban planning; 2) values and normative frameworks in planning; 3) the factors that contribute to the growth or decline of city-focused regions. Readings pull from planning, economic geography, sociology, and urban studies to explain the spatial, industrial, and people-focused patterns of development in cities, suburbs, and regions. Offered every fall.

UPD 5020 - Land Use Planning & Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides students with an overview of how land use decisions are made, and activities involved in land use planning. Starting with the history and theory of land use planning, this course develops a conceptual framework for how-the often controversial-decisions are made, exploring the issues from the perspectives of the public and the private sectors. Students examine values and objectives behind the different approaches to land management and the role that the local government plays in establishing a land use program. Students also consider the necessary information required to develop a land use plan, examining the different types of data and how they might be used. Students ultimately examine land use practices at the site level, exploring development issues for a series of specific land uses. Following this class, students will have the necessary analytical skills to examine a series of land use development issues. (Offered every spring.)

UPD 5030 - Land Use Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will focus on the legal and planning problems of allocating and developing land, primarily in metropolitan areas in the United States. Special attention will be paid to the tension between the values of free enterprise and private property on the one hand and demands for public open space, control of urban sprawl, and free choice in the location of residence on the other hand. Specific topics to be covered include the extent of and limitations on governmental power to regulate the use of land; traditional planning, zoning and subdivision regulations; special techniques including use of “wait and see” regulatory devices, development exactions, historic preservation districts, transfer of development rights and “new urbanism” planning; impact of environmental protection legislation; growth of state-wide statutory regulation, including “smart growth” legislation; neighborhood collaborative planning, and non-adversarial dispute resolute techniques. (Offered in Fall)

UPD 5100 - Research Methods

Credit(s): 3 Credits

In this class, we will explore the basic methods used in planning and policy analysis. Whether as an urban planner or private developer/consultant, we all encounter policy reports and documents and are required to decipher them at some point in our careers. Many of us will also write these reports or use them as source material for grant proposals or funding requests, thus understanding the methods is essential to our work. This course provides the foundation for planning and policy analysis, examining the basic methods used in addressing planning and development problems. (Offered every fall.)

UPD 5110 - Quantitative Planning Methods

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed as an introduction to statistical analysis for graduate students in urban planning and development. It is offered in collaboration with the Biostatistics program in the School of Public Health. Planning students will work alongside public health and health administration graduate students. Topics include basic probability and descriptive statistics, statistical inference and hypothesis tests, linear and logistic regression, and non-parametric statistics. Content is taught for conceptual understanding and application. Statistical software is used throughout the course.

UPD 5120 - Planner's Use of Information

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Students learn how to collect and use spatial and non spatial data to address urban planning and development policy questions facing local communities. The course covers all the different methods that planners use to analyze the impacts and identify issues associated with planning and the development process. This class satisfies the research methods requirement for the Master of Science in Urban Planning and Development.

UPD 5200 - Local Economic Development Policy & Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the context, theory, process, and practice of local economic development planning. Topics covered include theoretical and conceptual explanations of the economic development process; international, national, and regional factors affecting local economic development; federal, state, and local roles; contrasting economic development approaches and methods for planning and practice; equity, participation, and partnerships in economic development; and financing tools for local economic development. (Offered every spring.)

UPD 5220 - Infrastructure & Plan Implementation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores various systems and services that support a city and region and how function. How are they financed? How do they interact with other systems? These include all systems and services that engage in some planning function, including transportation, water, sewer, and schools. Offered every spring.

UPD 5250 - Planning & Development in St. Louis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the major demographic, economic and social trends that have characterized St. Louis. It will be relevant to those with an interest in city planning and community development, but also urban history, economic development, housing and related topics. Students will study plans and projects, some of which were implemented and some not. The intent is to examine the ingredients of successful plans, programs and projects; appreciation for the consequences (both intended and unintended) of development decisions; and a better understanding of the city and the region.

UPD 5260 - Real Estate & Economic Development

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to teach students the fundamentals of real estate and development planning, with a focus on the interaction between public and private sectors. The desired result is to provide the students with an overview of both perspectives and strategies so that those going into either the related public or private sector fields have a broad background of how development initiatives work within the context of the public process.

UPD 5350 - Environmental Planning

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to present the concepts and frameworks used for environmental planning. This course will present both the contexts within which environmental planning takes place and the frameworks, tools and substantive knowledge with which environmental planners plan. The course uses examples from urban, metropolitan and regional environmental settings. Course objectives include: exploring the relationships between ecological conditions and human settlements and to understand how human activities affect these conditions; becoming familiar with the history and values of ecological/environmental planning; and becoming familiar with the methods for planning to mitigate environmental negatives and restore and sustain ecological integrity and human quality of life.

UPD 5360 - Sustainability & the Built Environment

Credit(s): 3 Credits

In 1987 the World Commission on Environment and Development (aka the Bruntland Commission) was convened to address the growing concerns about environmental degradation in light of escalating human development. From that came the call to switch the world policy focus toward a more sustainable future. Sustainable development is most commonly defined as meeting the needs of our present generation while taking the needs of the future generation into consideration. The concept appears simply. Yet, the challenge lies in how we get there. What does it mean to meet the needs of our present generation? How do we define those needs? And what does it mean to take the needs of a future generation into consideration at the same time? What does all of that look like? Therein lies the policy challenge. As we enter the second decade of the 21st century, the world looks vastly different from the time when these conversations about sustainable development began. Even within the past year, the policy frame has changed dramatically, suggesting that there is room for expanding the sustainable development discourse. In this course we explore those questions at the global, national, and local scale.

UPD 5450 - Community Development Finance

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides students with conceptual and practical tools needed to participate in the decision-making for and financing of projects, including commercial real estate, that relate to community development goals. The course introduces students to the policy and practice of community development finance, with an emphasis on the resources available to assist for-profit and not-for-profit private sector developers to undertake community development projects in markets and with populations outside of the financial mainstream. The course will include the fundamentals of decision-making about the financing of community development (i.e. real estate loan/investment underwriting), development goals, such as the building of affordable housing, community facilities, charter schools and commercial real estate development. Topics covered with include Community Development Block Grant, HOME Investment Partnership funding, Low Income Housing Tax Credits, Tax-Exempt Bond Financing, New Markets Tax Credits, and others. Moving course from Spring offering to Fall only offering.

UPD 5500 - Real Estate Finance

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course provides practical working knowledge and capabilities in the methods and techniques used in the financial analysis of real estate development projects. We will spend the majority of our time understanding, practicing, and applying present-value mathematics, the concept of return, discounted cash flow analysis, project cost and benefits, and a complete financial analysis of a real estate development project. We will develop Excel spreadsheet capabilities and use them in all the analysis steps. Finally, we will review the loan process for commercial real estate projects. This course provides a hands-on approach to real estate finance and emphasizes the knowledge and analysis required for direct investment in real estate projects. This course will provide the skills necessary to evaluate potential opportunities in real estate. (Offered every fall.)

UPD 5900 - Planning & Development Studio

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is interdisciplinary and open to students in urban planning and design, architecture, law, business, social work, and public health. Students and faculty from Saint Louis University and Washington University work in interdisciplinary teams to respond to projects in collaboration with local partners in the St. Louis region. During class, faculty members and subject experts present on multi-disciplinary aspects of development projects to help guide the work of class teams.(Offered every fall.)

UPD 5910 - Internship

Credit(s): 1 Credit (Repeatable for credit)

Students are required to complete an internship during their course of study. The internship must be approved by their program advisor and must involve at least six weeks of full-time work involving a planning or development related project. At the end of their internship students are expected to write a 2,500-word essay discussing their work/project and how it relates to planning and development. In this essay, students will apply classroom knowledge to the internship experience. (Offered as needed.)

UPD 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

UPD 5960 - Capstone

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Student selects a project to evaluate planning issues and design planning alternatives toward a development or redevelopment. The formal plan is accompanied by an analytical report. The report is presented in public forum. Offered every semester.

UPD 5980 - Graduate Reading Course

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Apply for Admission

For additional admission questions please contact:
Kathryn MacLean
Director of Graduate Recruitment and Admissions
314-977-2752
socialwork@slu.edu