Public Health Graduate Programs

Leadership

Michael Rozier, S.J., Ph.D.
     Chair, Health Management and Policy
Zhengmin Qian, Ph.D., M.D. 
     Chair, Epidemiology and Biostatistics 
Enbal Shacham, Ph.D.
     Interim Chair, Behavioral Science and Health Education

Behavioral Science and Health Education

Elizabeth Baker, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Ellen K. Barnidge, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Keon L. Gilbert, Dr.P.H., M.A., M.P.A.
Juliet Iwelunmor, Ph.D.
Roger D. Lewis, Ph.D., C.I.H. (Emeritus)
Darcell P. Scharff,  Ph.D.
Anne K. Sebert Kuhlmann, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Enbal Shacham, Ph.D., M.Ed., M.P.E.
Nancy L. Weaver, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Ricardo J. Wray, Ph.D., M.S.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Lauren D. Arnold, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Jen Jen Chang, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Michael Elliott, Ph.D.
Travis Loux, Ph.D.
Zhengmin "Min" Qian, M.D., Ph.D.
Terri Rebmann, Ph.D., R.N., CIC, FAPIC
Steven Rigdon, Ph.D.
Katherine Stamatakis, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Maya Tabet, Ph.D., M.S.
Pamela Xaverius, Ph.D.
Hong Xian, Ph.D.

Department of Health Management and Policy

Michael Counte, Ph.D. (Emeritus)
Kimberly Enard, Ph.D., M.B.A.
Mark Gaynor, Ph.D.
Kathleen N. Gillespie, Ph.D.
Kenton Johnston, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Echu Liu, Ph.D.
Michael Rozier, S.J., Ph.D.
Cheryl Rathert, Ph.D.
Kevin M. Syberg, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.
Marcea Walter, M.H.S.A.
Kristin Wilson, Ph.D., M.H.A.
Kathleen S. Wright, Ed.D. (Emeritus)

BSDP 5100 - Public Health and Disasters

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces the growing threat and potential public health consequences of all types of disasters. Content includes an introduction to public health and public health's role in disaster preparedness and response. In this course, threats to public health are introduced. Intentional disasters (chemical, biological, and radiological terrorism) and natural disasters are covered; emphasis is placed on infectious disease emergencies such as biological terrorism and emerging infections. (Offered annually)

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

BSDP 5101 - Fundamentals of Disaster Planning

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of strategies for and challenges to planning for all types of disasters. All phases of the emergency management model will be addressed: mitigation, preparation, response, and recovery. Content includes tools and resources needed to develop and/or evaluate a facility or community all hazards response plan and create exercises to test this plan.

BSDP 5102 - Introduction to Biostatistics and Decision Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will cover basic statistical methods, including common inferential statistical tests encountered in infectious disease epidemiology, emergency and public health response and medical intelligence. The course will include an introduction to decision analysis and developing and using decision trees used for optimizing choices in the face of uncertainty.

BSDP 5103 - Communicable Diseases and Infection Control

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course teaches the fundamentals of communicable diseases. Content includes the microbiology of contagious pathogens, disease transmission, and infection control measures to prevent or stop the spread of communicable diseases. Emphasis is placed on the pathogens that are likely to be used in a bioterrorism attack and new or re-emerging infectious diseases. (Offered annually)

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

BSDP 5104 - Public Health Ecology

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will present the public health triad (interactions between humans, animals, and the environment). Content includes: general human and ecological factors contributing to zoonotic and other disease transmission; notable public health threats of infectious origin; scenarios of transmissible disease outbreaks in the wake of certain ecological changes; risk assessments for biohazards.

BSDP 5105 - Medical and Public Health Intelligence

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the rationale for the emerging role of the public health and medical communities in the intelligence gathering, analysis and dissemination process. Focusing on early detection of emerging physical threats and novel/emerging infectious diseases it will give the students the requisite knowledge and skills to provide the homeland security community with threat indications and warnings. Students will be given the analytical tools to allow them to gauge the impact of physical threats that would result in mass casualties and novel/emerging infectious diseases. They will be expected to develop and recommend rational and viable courses of action to those threats.

BSDP 5106 - Disaster Communications and Media Relations

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will provide an overview of crisis communication challenges associated with disasters, including basic human communications and communication needs, the impact of stressors in communications, risk communications to communities and to crisis communications. Students will learn the theoretical foundations of risk communication, how to apply those principles during a public health crisis, and how to formulate and institute appropriate communications plans for a variety of audiences and disaster response organizations. (Offered annually)

BSDP 5200 - Writing for Intelligence

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with the writing skills required to clearly, concisely and correctly deliver to end-users basic, current and estimative intelligence products. Students will be trained in the process of collecting, collating, analyzing, disseminating and evaluating intelligence products. The course emphasizes the importance of communicating the analyst's evidence based judgments in a clear, concise and easily understandable manner. It is designed to develop and refine the student's critical thinking skills and their ability to translate these skills into an actionable analytical product through the production of Actionable Intelligence Briefings and Travel Assessments.

BSDP 5201 - Terrorist Organizations and Their Motivations

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students a broad understanding of terrorist organizations and their motivations. History of terrorism, current movements and organizations (both domestic and international) will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on terrorist use of chemical/biological/radiological/nuclear weapons of mass destruction. (Offered annually)

BSDP 5203 - Disaster Planning for Infectious Disease Disasters

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of strategies for and challenges to planning for all types of disasters; emphasis is placed on biosecurity emergencies such as bioterrorism and outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases. Content includes tools and resources needed to develop and/or evaluate a facility or community all-hazards response plan and create exercises to test this plan.

Prerequisite(s): BSDP 5103

BSDP 5204 - Epidemiological Methods and Infectious Disease Surveillance

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Through audio lectures and readings, this course will present the student with the descriptive and analytical tools of epidemiology and surveillance. The student will analyze a data set using the epidemiological software package Epi Info. Students will participate in weekly internet discussions and analysis of problem sets. (Offered annually)

Prerequisite(s): BSDP 5103

BSDP 5205 - Behavioral and Cultural Aspects of Disasters

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the behavioral and cultural implications of terrorism and other disasters. Students will study a range of adaptive and abnormal responses to catastrophic events. Cultural and psychosocial sources of resilience to terrorism will be reviewed. (Offered annually)

BSDP 5206 - Disaster Management and Risk Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will give the student an overview of the importance of biosecurity and the performance of vulnerability and risk assessments. It will also teach them the skills necessary to be a competent manager/leader during an emergency. Management case studies will be used to help students identify limits to their knowledge and to help them recognize when they need to obtain additional resources. (Offered annually)

BSDP 5207 - Legal and Ethical Implications of Disasters

Credit(s): 3 Credits

BSDP 5208 - Facing the Challenge of International Bioterrorism

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will examine bioterrorism- the hostile infliction of disease, and how National and Global governance should manage the challenges it raises. The issue will be addressed from a variety of perspectives including: political, legal, medical and public health, with a special focus on international cooperation in dealing with bioterrorism.

BSDP 5209 - Emerging Infections: Epidemiology and Public Health Importance

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will present to the student an overview of Emerging Infectious Diseases, not only in the United States, but internationally. The course will lead off with an overview of the topic, emphasizing topical issues and concerns. Selected topics in order of importance to public health will be examined, with an emphasis on the epidemiology of the infection and its public health impact, either potential or actual.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

BSDP 5210 - Preparing for Disasters: Resiliency and Stress Inoculation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

While many private and public agencies have some sort of disaster response plan, few take into account the mental and emotional ramifications of disaster upon general and vulnerable populations. This course will investigate the use of resiliency and stress inoculation before disasters to lessen disaster impact and encourage effective and prompt recovery.

BSDP 5211 - Business Continuity and Pandemic Planning

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will give the student an understanding of Business Continuity Management and Pandemic Planning concepts. It will lay a foundation for recovery of people, places and technology in a business setting. This class will also focus on the unique aspects of planning for a pandemic.

BSDP 5212 - Global Health and Infectious Diseases

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The purpose of the research ara synthesis (RAS) is for the student to demonstrate sufficient command of an area of research and advance a body of knowledge. This is achieved by independently completing an extended review paper (e.g., 50-75 double spaced pages) that critically appraises and synthesizes the research literature on a particular topic. The result of this document shall include an assessment of major theories or perspectives, key findings, research design assets and limitations, and measurement issues, and development of a future research agenda. Limited to Ph.D. program in social work students who are in their final semester of coursework.

BSDP 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

BSDP 5960 - Capstone in Biosecurity and Disaster Preparedness

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Prerequisite: All other courses must be completed before enrolling in the Practicum, unless the student has special permission from the Program Associate Director or Director. Students may enroll in the Practicum during their final semester, even if they are taking another course(s) at the same time. This course is the capstone project for the Biosecurity and Disaster Preparedness programs. Students will demonstrate the skills of interdisciplinary planning and consequence management needed to respond to a bioterrorist event or naturally occurring epidemic. Students will develop an exercise using an infectious disease scenario. (Offered annually)

BSDP 5980 - Graduate Reading in Biosecurity and Disaster Preparedness

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

This course provides specialized study in environmental health to enhance skills in literature review and problem solving. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

BSDP 6930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

BSDP 6980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

BSH 5000 - Behavioral Science and Public Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces concepts, theories and methods employed by behavioral scientists to develop, implement and evaluate public health interventions. Selected theories of health behavior are presented. Principles of program evaluation methodology are introduced. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory and method to the design and assessment of approaches to solving current public health problems. For Masters students.

Restrictions:

Students with a classification of Freshman, Junior or Sophomore may not enroll.

Students in a Doctor of Philosophy degree may not enroll.

BSH 5100 - Health Promotion Program Planning

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Following the general framework of the PRECED-PROCEED planning model, this course explores the principles, theories, and essential steps of the health promotion planning process. Content includes a detailed review of the methods used in assessing. In this course, the process and methods of evaluation will be framed in terms of 'quality assurance', that is, documenting the extent to which program actions are implemented in accordance to stated objectives. Offered annually.

Prerequisite(s): (BSH 5000 or PUBH 5070)

BSH 5200 - Social Ecology of Public Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Theories of behavior inform understanding, design and assessment of programs and policies seeking to influence individual choices, behaviors, and population health outcomes. Individual-level determinants of behavior depend upon determinants at multiple levels of the social ecological model, namely, interpersonal and social influence, organizational and community settings, and structural, cultural and political forces. This course examines contributions and intersections of these environmental determinants with behavioral and health outcomes. The course emphasizes application of social ecological theoretical concepts through critique of research, as well as through the program planning process, including formative research, program and policy design and development and impact assessment.

Prerequisite(s): (BSH 5000 or PUBH 5070)

BSH 5300 - Public Health Approaches to Address Pediatric Injury and Violence

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will introduce students to selected topics in intentional and unintentional pediatric injury control and strategies for developing and evaluating effective prevention programs. Specific topics include car related injuries and injuries from falls, burns, firearms and violence with focus on risk factors for population subgroups.

BSH 5310 - Health Communication

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of theory and research on persuasive communication, emphasizing the application of persuasive communication principles to health education practice. Special emphasis is given to the application of new communication technologies to meet public health objectives. Students successfully completing this course will be able to analyze and critique health education and health promotion messages on the basis of theory and empirical research, and identify basic principles of persuasive communication which are applicable to health education practice. Offered annually. Cross-listed with CMM 5090, GIS 5070, PUBH 5040 and UPD 5110.

Prerequisite(s): (BSH 5000 or PUBH 5070)

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

BSH 5400 - Assessment, Intervention Development, and Evaluation I

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course reviews the theoretical bases underlying community diagnosis and community organizing, provides students with the opportunity to develop specific skills in community assessment, and assists in assessing the personal and professional challenges faced when working in diverse communities. The course also teaches students how to make decisions about the types of theory-based programs or strategies to implement based on both the community's perspective as well as need (evidence), enhancing the likelihood of intervention effectiveness. Offered every fall. For Masters students.

Restrictions:

Students in a Doctor of Philosophy degree may not enroll.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

BSH 5410 - Assessment, Intervention Development, and Evaluation II

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of health program evaluation. Although the course emphasizes general evaluation methodology, specific health program and health policy applications are explored as illustrations. In addition to surveying design and measurement basics, the course explores the role of evaluation research in health program development. Offered in spring.

Prerequisite(s): BSH 5400

BSH 5440 - Eliminating Health Disparities

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will examine community-based solutions for eliminating health disparities. Emphasis will be placed on examining the policy implications and evaluation of strategies and programs. Additionally, mechanisms for increasing cultural sensitivity and creating cultural competence among public health workers will be explored. (Offered every other year.)

BSH 5450 - Introduction to Qualitative Methods

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course enables students to understand the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative methods used for formative research and evaluation. Students will learn how to design qualitative studies, collect qualitative data using various methods, and analyze qualitative data at a fundamental level.

BSH 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

BSH 5960 - Capstone in Behavioral Science and Health Education

Credit(s): 3 Credits

BSH 5970 - Research Topics in Behavioral Science and Health Education

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

This course provides direct research experience in behavioral science and health education. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

BSH 5980 - Graduate Reading in Behavioral Science and Health Education

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

This course provides specialized study in behavioral science and health education to enhance skills in literature review and problem solving. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

BSH 6000 - Health Promotion Program Evaluation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course focuses on principles and procedures to evaluate health promotion and disease prevention programs. Evaluation design, reliability and validity, formative and process evaluation, and meta-analysis are introduced. The course includes intensive critique of case studies from the disease prevention program and policy literature. Case studies designed to reflect the diversity of methods and the range of possible applications are selected. (Offered annually)

Prerequisite(s): BSH 5000

BSH 6001 - Behavioral Sci & Public Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces concepts, theories and methods employed by behavioral scientists to develop, implement and evaluate public health interventions. Selected theories of health behavior are presented. Principles of program evaluation methodology are introduced. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory and method to the design and assessment of approaches to solving current public health problems. For Doctoral students.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

BSH 6020 - Intervention Research

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course helps students conceptualize, design, and conduct of behavioral intervention research in public health. Students are introduced to intervention research projects conducted to address a wide range of health problems and populations in community, health care, work-site and school settings. Students evaluate and critique these interventions in terms of research design and methodology, planning approach, and adherence to principles of participation. Students will design intervention-research projects to address a public-health problem of their choice. (Offered annually.)

BSH 6400 - AIDE I

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course reviews the theoretical bases underlying community diagnosis and community organizing, provides students with the opportunity to develop specific skills in community assessment, and assists in assessing the personal and professional challenges faced when working in diverse communities. The course also teaches students how to make decisions about the types of theory-based programs or strategies to implement based on both the community's perspective as well as need (evidence), enhancing the likelihood of intervention effectiveness. Offered every fall.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

BSH 6930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

BSH 6970 - Research Topics in Behavioral Science and Health Education

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

BSH 6980 - Graduate Reading in Behavioral Science and Health Education

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

BST 5000 - Principles of Biostatistics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed as an introduction to statistical analysis for students in public health, health administration and research. Topics include basic probability and descriptive statistics, statistical inference and hypothesis tests, linear and logistic regression, and non-parametric statistics. Content is taught for conceptual understanding and application. Statistical software is used throughout the course. (Offered every semester.) Cross-listed with GIS 5070, PUBH 5040 and UPD 5110.

Restrictions:

Students with a classification of Freshman, Junior or Sophomore may not enroll.

BST 5020 - Theory of Biostatistics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces the principles of probability and biostatistical inferences. Topics covered: role of statistics in scientific research, discrete random variables, continuous random variables, expectation and variance, moments and moment-generating functions, marginal and conditional probability, independence, functions of random variables, sampling distribution, the central limit theorem, methods of statistical estimation, hypothesis testing and confidence interval, and likelihood ratio test. (Offered annually.)

Attributes: Social Work PhD Methods, Social Work PhD Specilization

BST 5025 - Theory of Biostatistics II

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Point estimation, maximum likelihood, regression, sufficient statistics, Bayesian estimation. Interval estimation. Hypothesis testing for one and two samples. Power, likelihood ratio tests. Goodness-of-fit tests, contingency tables. Analysis of variance. (Offered each Spring)

Prerequisite(s): (BST 5020 or BST 4200)

BST 5030 - Statistical Programming and Study Planning: SAS

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course teaches statistical programming for statistical analysis using SAS software. Programming topics may include: working in the Windows environment, syntax development, creating data sets, reading and manipulating external data files, transforming data, formatting variables, statistical analysis and graphical display.

BST 5100 - Introduction to General Linear Modeling

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course presents a unified approach to the application of linear statistical models in biomedical and health services research. Topics include simple and multiple linear regression, Pearson's and non-parametric correlation, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and logistic regression. Both the theory and application of the general linear model (GLM) are presented. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): (BST 5000, PUBH 5040, or BST 5020*)

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Methods

BST 5200 - Survival Data Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course treats statistical methods for analyzing survival data derived from laboratory, clinical, and epidemiological studies of humans. Both parametric and nonparametric approaches are presented. Focus will be in the practical applications of these methods to clinical and epidemiological research. The SAS and SPSS statistical packages will be used for data management and analysis. (Offered every Fall)

Prerequisite(s): (BST 5000, PUBH 5040, or BST 5020); BST 5030; BST 5100

Attributes: Social Work PhD Methods

BST 5210 - Categorical Data Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces the theory and application of methods for categorical data, with emphasis on biomedical and social science applications. The course will cover the following topics: analysis of two-way, three-way, and higher dimension contingency tables using log-linear model, measures and tests of association for nominal and ordinal tables, logistic regression, weighted least squares, generalized linear models, and the use of computer software analyzing categorical data. (Offered every Fall)

Prerequisite(s): (BST 5000, PUBH 5040, or BST 5020); BST 5030; BST 5100

Attributes: Social Work PhD Methods

BST 5220 - Multilevel and Longitudinal Data Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will focus on applications of various statistical methods for analyzing longitudinal, or repeated measures, data. The core concepts will cover multilevel analysis, growth curve modeling, and structural equation modeling.

Prerequisite(s): (BST 5000, PUBH 5040, or BST 5020); BST 5030; BST 5100

BST 5230 - Bayesian Statistics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The Bayesian approach to statistics is an alternative to the traditional methods based on hypothesis and significance testing. Bayesian statistics uses prior information and combines it with observable data to quantify knowledge after observing data in what is called the posterior. Simulation is used to approximate this posterior distribution.

Prerequisite(s): (BST 5000, PUBH 5040, or BST 5020); BST 5100

BST 5400 - Applied Data Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is an advanced course on data management for graduate students in the College for Public Health and Social Justice. This course will cover the basic skills necessary for maintaining databases as well as ensuring data quality and manipulating data. The course will also introduce an experiential component in data base design and management. Students will learn advanced concepts and techniques with particular emphasis on applications in public health. Students will learn to use multiple data management and data analysis software packages.

Prerequisite(s): (PUBH 5040 or BST 5020)

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

BST 5420 - Sampling Theory and Survey Design in Public Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will provide a survey of the fundamental types of probability sampling designs that are used for data collection with Public Health Surveillance Sample Surveys including: systematic random sampling (including Random-Digit Dialing), simple and stratified random sampling, cluster sampling and multistage sampling. The course will briefly discuss the applications of current survey research methods including web-based surveys and the use cell phones within the context of surveillance systems and registry-based samples. The role of survey design choices in reducing total survey error as well as the role of questionnaire design in reducing non-sampling biases will be discussed briefly. The main topics to be covered in detail include: design-based parameter and variance estimation methods, construction and use of survey weights and statistical models incorporating sample designs as well as the used of survey sampling for registry based samples and matched case/control studies. Methods for evaluating, reducing and adjusting for survey nonresponse will also be covered.

Prerequisite(s): (BST 5000, PUBH 5040, or BST 5020)

BST 5450 - Data Visualization

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Visual presentation of data in ways that emphasize the structure and significance in data. Guidelines for preparing static graphs, dynamic graphs, interactive graphs, and dashboards. Applies R, including packages R Markdown, ggplot2, plotly, and shiny, and the D3 package in JavaScript.

BST 5500 - Statistical Learning

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Algorithms for learning how to classify variables given a set of predictor variables. Linear regression, logistic regression and linear discriminant analysis. Cross-validation and bootstrapping. Model selection. Ridge regression and the LASSO. Nonlinear models, splines and generalized additive models. Tree-based methods, random forests and boosting. Support vector machines. Unsupervised learning methods are also discussed, including principal components and k-means clustering. (Offered in Spring)

Prerequisite(s): (BST 4100 or BST 5020 with a grade of C or higher)

BST 5600 - R for Spatial Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Geospatial data structures in R. Plotting and exploring data in R. Using R to manage data. Point process analysis using smoothed kernel density estimation and kriging. Variograms and semi-variograms. Spatial autocorrelation in areal data. Moran’s I and Geary’s G. Spatial autogegression. (Offered in Spring)

Prerequisite(s): GIS 5010 with a grade of C or higher; (BST 4100 or BST 5020 with a grade of C or higher)

BST 5610 - Spatial Epidemiology and Disease Mapping

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Statistical methods for disease data that include geographic information. Disease maps and relative risk estimation. Mapping and geographic information systems. Bayesian methods of estimation for conditional autoregressive models. Disease cluster detection. Regression and ecological analysis. (Offered in Fall)

Prerequisite(s): BST 5100 with a grade of C or higher, BST 5600 with a grade of C or higher, and PUBH 5030 with a grade of C or higher

BST 5620 - Spatio-Temporal Models in Public Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Models for the spread of epidemics, including the susceptible – infected – removed (SIR) model and some of its generalizations. Kriging in both space and time. Areal data modeling, including the conditional autoregressive model, across time. (Offered in Spring)

Prerequisite(s): BST 5610 with a grade of C or higher; (BST 4200 or BST 5025 with a grade of C or higher)

BST 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

BST 5960 - Capstone in Biostatistics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The capstone course will emphasize practical aspects of being a successful statistician, including communicating with non-statisticians, orally and in writing. Sample size determination, an important problem in biostatistics, will be studied both analytically and using simulation.

Prerequisite(s): BST 5030; BST 5100; BST 5200; BST 5210

BST 5961 - Master's Project

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is an independent directed research project. Students work on an applied research project under the guidance of a biostatistics faculty member. Using the skills developed in the Masters of Science in Biostatistics and Health Analytics, each student poses a research question in public health and uses data to address the problem.

BST 5970 - Research Topics in Biostatistics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course provides direct research experience in biostatistics. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

BST 5980 - Graduate Reading in Biostatistics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

This course provides specialized study in biostatistics to enhance skills in literature review and problem solving. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

BST 6100 - Causal Inference

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to causal inference with application sin public health and social justice. Topics include the potential outcomes model, the theory behind and application of randomized trials, and application of causal inference techniques to observational studies. Students will perform analyses with propensity scores, instrumental variables, and graphical causal models (DAGs) and investigate mediation in the causal framework. The focus of the course will be application of methods as opposed to statistical theory.

Prerequisite(s): BST 5030; BST 5100

Attributes: Social Work PhD Methods

BST 6930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

BST 6970 - Research Topics in Biostatistics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

BST 6980 - Graduate Reading Course

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

EOH 5000 - Environmental and Occupational Health

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

Course addresses the interaction of the physical, psychological, and social environments of individuals in which they work and live. It presents a broad survey of the major environmental issues facing contemporary society in first and third world countries. The course combines an overall ecological concern with specific elements related to personal and community health, emphasizing the interrelatedness of the two and conveying an awareness of how current environmental issues directly affect our lives. (Offered twice each year.)

EOH 5100 - Human Toxicology and Environmental Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Toxicology is the basic science of poison and its adverse effects on living organisms. These deleterious effects on man are the focus of this course. The fundamental information that make up the core of toxicology will be introduced. The course will be divided into five basic areas: (1) basic principles, (2) effects on the organ system, (3) review of general categories of toxic agents, (4) basic environmental toxins, and (5) the general application of toxicology. (Offered annually.)

EOH 5200 - Evaluation of Environmental Hazards

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course presents the study of chemical, physical, and biologic agents, and ergonomic factors related to environmental and occupational exposures. Methodologies used for their recognition and evaluation relative to potential health effects and the etiology of related illness and disease are discussed. Federal and State regulatory requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Occupational Safety and Health Agency, other relevant federal and state agencies and consensus organization will be addressed. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): EOH 5000

EOH 5220 - Occupational Safety

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the managerial, behavioral, and engineering-technical aspects of occupational safety. Historical perspectives, regulatory compliance and industry best practices are discussed. The course also addresses current trends in worker compliance and participation as well as the technical aspects of an array of applicable regulatory standards. Specific technical aspects are explored in greater depths in support of the research paper/presentation and directed study components of the course. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): EOH 5000

EOH 5290 - Environmental and Occupational Laboratory

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course emphasizes the use and application of sampling and analytical methodologies for environmental and occupational exposure measurement, and toxicity testing of chemical and physical agents in the environment. This is a quantitative, hands on, instrumentation and laboratory based course. Field use application is introduced. (Offered annually)

Prerequisite(s): EOH 5000

EOH 5300 - Biological Hazards in Modern and Developing Countries

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course addresses the nature of biological hazards at the intersection of developing and modern countries. These hazards are described by their sources, pathways, routes of entry, and health effects of infectious and allergenic agents that are found in either workplaces or the general environment. Through in-depth field exercise, lectures, and case studies, students will learn how to identify, measure, and control biological agents that are present in a variety of settings. Basic concepts from aerosol science, industrial hygiene, microbiology, infectious disease epidemiology, sanitation, behavioral science, and environmental engineering are applied to problems of infectious or allergic disease prevention and control. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): EOH 5000

EOH 5400 - Human Health Risk Analysis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces the concepts of qualitative and quantitative methods of risk assessment. Class discussions, reading assignments, lectures and case studies are used to introduce and develop knowledge of information sources pertaining to assumptions, uncertainties, end-product determinations, and interpretations associated with the various components of the risk-assessment process. Students will apply quantitative risk analysis method s on real-life cases. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): EOH 5000; (BST 5000 or BST 5020)

EOH 5600 - Policy, Science and Decisions in Environmental Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to provide students with analytical tools they can use to think critically about environmental policymaking. The focus of the course is on the interface between the fields of environmental, public health, and policy sciences. Therefore, special attention is paid to policy decisions that affect environmental protection and public health. The course examines the current approaches to environmental regulation such as command and control, comparative risk assessment, and market-based incentives. It also discusses environmental justice issues, sustainable development, and policies concerning particular environmental problems in the United States and the international community. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): EOH 5000

EOH 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

EOH 5960 - Capstone in Environmental and Occupational Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The ultimate purpose of the course is in skill building for the professional practice of EOH. A framework for solving problems throughout the many sub-specialties of the EOH field is presented. Students are given assignments on major and challenging issues that confront the EOH investigator, program manager, and policy maker that are relevant to a range of jobs and careers throughout the profession. Students learn about the profession through an environmental and occupational health audit where scientific skills must be matched with ethical, business, managerial, political, and communication acumen.

EOH 5970 - Research Topics in Environmental and Occupational Health

Credit(s): 1-4 Credits

This course provides direct research experience in environmental health. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

EOH 5980 - Graduate Reading in Environmental and Occupational Health

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

This course provides specialized study in environmental health to enhance skills in literature review and problem solving. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

EOH 6930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

EOH 6970 - Research Topics in Environmental and Occupational Health

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

EOH 6980 - Graduate Reading

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

EPI 5000 - Principles of Epidemiology

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to epidemiology, which is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations and the application to the control of health problems. Topics will include analytic reasoning in public health and disease surveillance, descriptive and analytic study designs, and causal inference. Basic statistical measures used in the analysis of epidemiologic studies, including measures of disease frequency and measures of association, will be covered.

Restrictions:

Students with a classification of Freshman, Junior or Sophomore may not enroll.

EPI 5020 - Epidemiology Methods II

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is offered to graduate students who desire more intensive training in epidemiologic research methods than offered in EPI 5000. This course covers observational study designs, infectious disease outbreak analysis, sampling methods, statistical power, multivariate analysis, types of bias, and causal inference. Offered annually.

Prerequisite(s): (EPI 5000 or PUBH 5030); (BST 5000, PUBH 5040, or BST 5020)

EPI 5110 - Epidemiology of Infectious Disease

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The history of epidemiology and infectious diseases are intricately intertwined. Our understanding of Infectious Diseases requires an integration of phenomenal advances including newly recognized pathogens, explosion of diagnostic technology, hosts with unprecedented compromised states, a better understanding of dynamic demographic and sociocultural forces, and improvements in study design, analysis, and modeling. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): (EPI 5000 or PUBH 5030)

EPI 5120 - Chronic Disease Epidemiology

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course considers some of the major substantive issues and methods used in chronic disease epidemiology. Emphasis will be on the application of epidemiologic principles and methods related to cancer, cardiovascular diseases, psychiatric illness, and other chronic diseases. Topics include classification of diseases, rates, associations, etiology, prevention, and control. (Offered every year)

Prerequisite(s): (EPI 5000 or PUBH 5030)

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

EPI 5220 - Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Explores epidemiologic methods/research related to MCH public health practice. Emphasis is placed on synthesizing research that potentially challenges current public health policy and communicating the findings to policy makers. Includes analysis of infant mortality and selected reproductive, perinatal and child health issues such as infant mortality, childhood obesity, lead poisoning, prenatal substance abuse, and prenatal and childhood HIV infection. Policy implications are discussed.

Prerequisite(s): (BST 5000, BST 5020, or PUBH 5040); (EPI 5000 or PUBH 5030)

EPI 5250 - Social Epidemiology

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will provide a survey of the social determinants of health (e.g. socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, social capital and neighborhood influences) with emphasis on methods and issues of measurement of social factors, and advanced methodologies in social epidemiology (e.g. community-based participatory research, GIS and spatial mapping, multi-level modeling)

Prerequisite(s): PUBH 5030

EPI 5270 - Cancer Epidemiology

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of concepts related to cancer epidemiology, including cancer biology, etiology, surveillance, and study design. Classic examples and current topics will be used to explore the role of epidemiology in addressing disparities, policies, and population-based approaches to cancer prevent and control.

Prerequisite(s): (EPI 5000 or PUBH 5030); (BST 5000, PUBH 5270, or BST 5020)

EPI 5280 - Perinatal Epidemiology

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Issues related to the perinatal period from the framework of epidemiologic methods will be examined in the course through critical review of epidemiologic studies and exploration of design issues for this population. The students will also learn to apply perinatal research principles to data analysis in perinatal research through in-class data analysis exercise and individual research project.

Prerequisite(s): (EPI 5000 or PUBH 5030)

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

EPI 5500 - Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course presents the epidemiological methods used to investigate the health effects of occupational and environmental exposures to toxins. Epidemiological evidence concerning the health effects of selected occupational and environmental exposures will be critically reviewed and evaluated. (Offered annually)

Prerequisite(s): (EPI 5000 or PUBH 5030); (BST 5000 or PUBH 5040)

EPI 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

EPI 5960 - Capstone in Epidemiology

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The purposes of this course are 1) to develop the practical statistical skills to analyze an epidemiologic data set, and 2) to learn to write a scientific paper in the form of a journal article from the results of epidemiologic data analysis. Stratified analysis and modeling using main effects logistic regression will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): (BST 5000 or PUBH 5040); BST 5100; BST 5200; (EPI 5000 or PUBH 5030); EPI 5020; BST 5210*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

EPI 5970 - Research Topics in Epidemiology

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

This course provides direct research experience in epidemiology. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

EPI 5980 - Graduate Reading in Epidemiology

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

This course provides specialized study in epidemiology to enhance skills in literature review and problem solving. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

EPI 6930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

EPI 6970 - Research Topics in Epidemiology

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

EPI 6980 - Graduate Reading in Epidemiology

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

GLOH 5000 - Introduction to Global Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces the broad field of global health, both the predominant health issues in low- and middle-income countries and the main players and payers who respond to these issues. The purpose is to understand who the main players in global health are, what their roles and responsibilities are, where they get their funding, and the challenges of coordination with so many different players. The course will look at specific health issues that are important globally and analyze which players have been involved in addressing these health issues. Finally, students will be expected to follow current events in global health. Offered in fall.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

GLOH 5100 - Global Health Assessment and Evaluation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course challenges students to assess the magnitude and severity of global public health problems in low-resource settings, consider responses to those problems within a theoretical context and then design theory-based evaluation research. The purpose of this course is to prepare for developing and evaluation theory-based interventions to address global pubic health problems. The course introduces students to methodologies for engaging stakeholders, conducting situational analyses, developing program theory and logic models, defining evaluation purpose, and then designing evaluations to fulfill that purpose. It also requires students to analyze interventions from a theory-based perspective.

GLOH 5200 - Global Health and Implementation Science

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to implementation science with an emphasis on its application for global health. The course will highlight all aspects of implementation, including the factors affecting implementation in a global context, the processes of implementation, and the results of implementation, including how to introduce potential solutions into a health system or how to promote their large-scale use and sustainability. The intent is to understand what, why, and how interventions work in “real world” global settings and to test approaches to improve them. Students will have the opportunity to work in groups and independently. Offered in fall.

GLOH 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

A course to present topics not covered in established courses based on faculty and student interests. An avenue to develop new courses on a trial basis. Offered periodically.

GLOH 5980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

GLOH 6930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

GLOH 6980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HMP 5000 - Health Care Organization

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of and orientation to the US health care delivery system. Topics include the delivery, financing, regulation, and administration of health care services, and the economic, legal, political, and social factors which influence the health care system. Historical and contemporary issues are addressed. (Offered annually.) Cross-listed with PUBH 5050.

HMP 5030 - Introduction to Health Care Accounting

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the basics of financial and managerial accounting. The focus will be on the accounting concepts that are most critical to management decision making within a managed health care environment. Offered annually.

HMP 5040 - Fundamentals of Economics and Finance

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Focus is on understanding the basic theories of economics and how they relate to financial analysis and methods. Principal learning approaches employed include lectures, class discussion, and preparation of problem sets. Offered every Fall semester.

HMP 5100 - Quality Improvement in Health Care Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the historical development, current concepts and techniques and future trends related to the monitoring and evaluation of the quality of health care services. Cases will be used to present current issues surrounding attempts to integrate quality management and increased accountability in health care organization. (Offered annually)

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5300

HMP 5110 - Health Operations Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Course examines operational issues in health care management. Topics include systems analysis, continuous quality improvement and re-engineering, demand forecasting, facility location and design models, decision analysis techniques, linear programming, queuing and waiting models, inventory control models, and statistical quality control. The goal is to instill an understanding of the language, applications, and limitations of quantitative models with regard to decision making and problem solving in health care organizations. (Offered annually.)

HMP 5130 - Health Information Systems

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to develop four areas of student knowledge, skills, and competencies in Health Information Management (HIM). It provides a broad overview of the theory and application of computers in the health setting, with emphasis on the health manager's role in relation to the information function. It introduces students to computer hardware, software and operating systems through hands-on experience with specific application programs such as word processing, spreadsheets, statistical packages , and data base managers. Students learn to identify the necessary resources, staff support and change management required to develop, implement, and evaluate a health information system. Finally, the course explores the potential and limits of information technology in improving community level health delivery via such resources as the Internet. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5000; HMP 5110

HMP 5160 - Health Care Supply Chain Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will provide students a comprehensive understanding for managing the health care supply chain with its unique challenges. Content is classified into: understanding external partners, traditional supply chain management functions, and critical departments that disproportionately account for health care supply costs. Students will conduct a supply-chain project in an organization.

HMP 5190 - Analytical Methods for Health Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course presents basic epidemiological and statistical methods necessary for healthcare management, including disease and outbreaks, measuring outcomes and risks, and common statistical methods. For a specific management problem, students will apply methodological skills to understand, describe, analyze, and present a health problem.

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5000

HMP 5200 - Health Economics

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the corporate responsibility of health services administrators in reducing environmental and occupational health risks of communities and individuals they serve and of employees and patients who use or work in the health delivery system.

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5000

HMP 5210 - Economic Evaluation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Economic evaluation is the comparison of different interventions (or a proposed intervention versus the status quo) to determine which is the best use of society's scarce resources. It includes cost-minimization, cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility analysis. This course will cover the theoretical basis for economic evaluation, its use in health, and the mechanics of the 4 types of analysis. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5200

HMP 5300 - Management of Health Care Organizations

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course focuses on the macro-organizational concepts of managing complex health care organizations. Health care organizations are complex systems transforming inputs (professional, supplies, etc.) into outputs (health services) for customers (patients). To perform well, these systems require appropriate environmental assessments, strategy, governance, organizational structure, work processes, distribution of power, innovation and change. These requirements for effective organizational performance form the core content of the course. Offered annually.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MPH Health Mgmt Policy, MPH Health Mgmt Pol (Dual JD) or MPH Health Mgmt Policy / Epi programs.

Enrollment limited to students in a Master Health Administration degree.

HMP 5310 - Medical Practice Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will focus on ambulatory health care delivery systems, comparing and contrasting them with other health care models. The managerial process, including financing, personnel, organizational structures, physical plant, and external relationships, will be explored. The relationship of demographic variables to the planning process for ambulatory care will be developed. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5000; HMP 5300

HMP 5340 - Health Care Marketing

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to train future health services professionals in managing and marketing health services from a strategic perspective. The course is intended to present principles, theories, methods, and tools used in developing, implementing, and managing successful marketing strategy, which creates and shapes the future. The marketing process, consumer behavior, the marketing mix, and controlling and monitoring marketing processes are examined in relationship to the unique and changing aspects of the health services industry. Offered annually.

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5000

HMP 5380 - Management of Human Resources in Health Care

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course focuses on functions and concepts required for managing human resources in organizations. It combines traditional human resource management (HRM) functions with concepts from organization behavior. Course content includes selection, training and development, compensation, performance appraisal, motivation, organizational development, union activity, and modes of conflict resolution. Offered annually.

HMP 5390 - Ethical Leadership in Health Management and Policy

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This applied course examines leadership though case studies in a variety of contexts and cultures. The purpose is to expand students’ point of view by considering the theoretical foundations and historical perspectives of leadership, contemporary views of leadership, and student’s personal exploration of ethics-based leadership in the healthcare setting.

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5300

HMP 5400 - Legal Aspects of Health Services Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is designed to familiarize students with legal issues in the health care field. It is also designed to provide students with insight into how the legal system functions, how lawyers analyze legal problems, and how health care administrators may interact with the legal system and lawyers. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5000; HMP 5300

HMP 5500 - Health Policy

Credit(s): 3 Credits

A course in health policy for advanced graduate students. The purposes of the course are to orient the students to the policy process, to increase the student's understanding of the nature of health policy making and health politics and to provide the student with an opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of current health care policy issues. (Offered every other year.)

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5000*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

HMP 5510 - Health Policy & Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5000; HMP 5300; HMP 5500

HMP 5620 - Crisis Leadership

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Today's organizations, communities, and social systems are faced with unprecedented, increasingly complex, and more devastating and recurrent crisis events. This course provides students with an overview of crisis leadership and emergency management, the continuum between traditional and crisis leadership, and a framework for a systematic approach to related theory, models and methods.

HMP 5700 - Health Care Financial Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Corporate finance techniques for financial decision-making are applied to health care organizations using 'real world' case studies. In addition to basic finance concepts, topics include capital acquisition, cost of capital, capital investment decisions, tools of risk analysis, and financial and operating analysis. Both for-profit and not-for-profit health care organizations are studied. The course employs extensive use of Excel spreadsheets. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5030

HMP 5710 - Financial Aspects of Health Care

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Managed health care integrates health insurance functions with delivery of medical care. This course introduces students to financial issues faced by health care managers in a managed care environment. Topics include fundamentals of insurance, capitation rate development, risk analysis in managed care systems, cost accounting and management, and Medicare and Medicaid managed care. The course employs case analysis and team projects with local health-related organizations. (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5700

HMP 5720 - Government Financing of Health Care

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces the students to the economic theory of public goods and relates it to the role of government in providing for the maintenance and improvement of community health. The efficiency and effectiveness of current government financing strategies are analyzed. Topics include the theories of public goods and public choice, public budgeting processes, cost-benefit/cost effectiveness analysis of public investment, structure of Medicare, Medicaid and public health funding, and the economic effects of public financing of health-related services (Offered annually.)

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5300; HMP 5500

HMP 5725 - Health Insurance and Managed Care

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Affordable Care Act implementation and consolidation within the health care industry have led to dramatic changes to the health insurance and managed care system in the United States. This course covers the fundamentals of health insurance and managed care, as well as recent changes and where the industry is headed in the future. The course will focus on the following topics: the basics of health insurance theory, an overview of the public and private health insurance system in the United States, impact of the ACA and other governmental regulations on the health system, and key components of managed care. Offered in spring. Must be enrolled in the MHA program, must not be enrolled in undergraduate level courses.

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5000

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in a Master Health Administration degree.

HMP 5800 - Strategic Management in Health Care Organizations

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This is the capstone course in the SLU Health Management and Policy MHA curriculum. It is open to MHA students (or others with the permission of the instructor). The purpose of this course is to assist the student in integrating the knowledge and skills developed during their course of study in the MHA program in the context of strategic thinking and strategic management of health care organizations. Integration is supported by individual and team analysis of complex health management cases.

HMP 5810 - Six Sigma Green Belt

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Prerequisite(s): HMP 5000

HMP 5820 - Health Care Project Management

Credit(s): 3 Credits

HMP 5900 - Health Management and Policy Rounds

Credit(s): 1 Credit (Repeatable for credit)

Career development lecture series designed to expose students to the philosophical approaches, leadership styles, policy processes and decision-making strategies used by successful health care management executives, health policy makers and health policy analysts across the spectrum of the health sector.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the MPH Health Mgmt Policy, MPH Health Mgmt Pol (Dual JD) or MPH Health Mgmt Policy / Epi programs.

HMP 5910 - HMP Internship

Credit(s): 1 Credit (Repeatable for credit)

A required intensive 12-week, full-time (480 hour) field experience designed to provide students with an opportunity to employ skills and principles learned in the classroom while working in a health care organization. (Offered in Summer)

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the programs.

HMP 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HMP 5950 - Special Study for Exams

Credit(s): 0 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HMP 5960 - Capstone Seminar in Health Management & Policy

Credit(s): 3 Credits

As a capstone or culminating experience, the seminar integrates learning from all aspects of the curriculum through application of knowledge in individual and group exercises. The course also considers issues of current significance for health policy in the United States and internationally. Offered annually.

HMP 5970 - Research Topics in Health Management and Policy

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

HMP 5980 - Graduate Reading in Health Management and Policy

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

MCH 5000 - Foundations in Maternal Child Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course introduces Maternal Child Health in public health using the Life Course Model and including: key Maternal Child Health legislation and programs, analysis of current health issues for mothers, children, and families from preconception to adolescence. Health disparities, Maternal Child Health policies, and programs in resource-poor environments, domestically and internationally, receive attention.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

MCH 5010 - Programs, Policy and Advocacy in Maternal and Child Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Builds on MCH 5000 and MCH Epidemiology and other required courses. Focuses on application of assessment, program design and program evaluation skills to meet Maternal Child Health population needs domestically and internationally. Attention will be given to leadership skills including program management, policy analysis and advocacy for mothers, children and their families.

Prerequisite(s): MCH 5000; (EPI 5220 or EPI 5280*)

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

MCH 5020 - Maternal Child Health Leadership Excellence and Development

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will focus on building on students' experiences to broaden their understanding of public health and develop effective leadership and implementation science skills within this challenging and rewarding field of public health.The broad goal for this class is to further facilitate the process of students exploring and developing their own leadership needs through course content, classmates' leadership insights, and shadowing public health leaders in the field. Improvement of leadership skills in public health professionals, in turn, will increase the likelihood of population and community health improvement. This course is cross-listed with the MCH program courses, and is required as the third in a sequence of MCH courses. MCH students are asked to complete this course as the third in a sequence, after MCH 5000 and MCH 5010. Offered in fall.

MCH 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

MCH 5960 - Capstone in Maternal Child Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

MCH 5970 - Research Topics in Maternal Child Health

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

MCH 5980 - Graduate Reading in Maternal Child Health

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

MCH 6930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

MCH 6970 - Research Topics in Maternal Child Health

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

MCH 6980 - Graduate Reading in Maternal Child Health

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

PHS 6010 - Design and Analysis in Public Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The purpose of this proseminar is to lay a foundation for the incoming student in the doctoral program in Health Services Research upon which all subsequent courses may build. That foundation consists of four principal components: (a) an introduction to the history, nature, and culture of health services research; (b) an introduction to the methods of critical appraisal necessary for evaluating the burgeoning literature field; (c) the routine application of those critical appraisal methods in the context of written assignments and in-class discussion; and (d) a hands-on review of basic statistical analysis using the national norming study for the SF-36 health outcomes measures as the example. Offered annually.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Methods

PHS 6040 - Applied Research Skills I: Primary Data Collection

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The increasing size and complexity of studies is leading more doctoral students in public health to base their dissertation work on existing data. While the analysis of existing data provides useful experience in complex analyses, it gives trainees little of no hands-on experience in the actual design and conduct of a research study. As students pursue their careers, most will eventually want to collect original data. This course will provide doctoral students with the appropriate training on how to collect their own data in responding to a research question that they developed in PHS 6050: Science, Theory and Public Health. The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for doctoral students to begin to answer a previously determined research question by selecting an appropriate research design, and implement a data collection protocol. As a result, students will gain experience in primary data collection methods. The focus in this class will be the implementation of a data collection protocol that addresses multiple components of the ecological framework. (Offered every Spring)

Prerequisite(s): PHS 6050, PHS 6010*, and BST 5100

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Methods

PHS 6050 - Science, Theory and Public Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Doctoral students are presented with a framework for understanding health and health policy. Institutions involved in health require good data and professional analysis to guide goal-setting and policy decision. Students will explore how to focus their research careers on issues integral to the field of public health. Offered every fall semester.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

PHS 6060 - Applied Research Skills II: Grant Writing

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides doctoral students with instruction and hands-on experience in the preparation of a NIH grant application. NIH has a variety of grant mechanisms for researchers at various stages of their careers. If you don't already have your Ph.D. there are T and F series awards that one can apply for (if a U.S. citizen or non-citizen nationals or be lawfully entered into the US for permanent residence:; if you have your degree there are K series awards (and one F series; same citizen requirements as F & T) as well as R series awards of various types (for researchers who have successfully competed for research funding; not restricted by US citizen and residency status). There are also state and other awards for research funding (e.g., from APA, NSF, private foundations, etc.). We will review some of these. Purpose: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: a) Understand the elements in the preparation of a NIH grant application: biosketches, specific aims, hypotheses, innovation, significance, approach, evaluation. b) Understand the review mechanisms for a NIH grant application. c) Use the NIH pages on the web. d) Understand the principles used to move from an initial idea to a fully developed grant application. e) Read NIH grant applications and identify the strengths and weaknesses of the proposal. f) Prepare a power analysis and sample size calculations for research studies. g) Understand the principles that guide the protection of human subjects and informed consent in research and prepare an application. h) Prepare a budget for a research project.

Prerequisite(s): PHS 6050, BST 5100, PHS 6040, and PHS 6010*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Methods

PHS 6900 - Professional Development

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This Professional Development course for doctoral students is designed to provide students with structured experiences and activities to prepare doctoral candidates for work in academia and other professional roles. Students will have the opportunity to gain practical experience and knowledge in manuscript writing and review, career navigation, soft skills, research communication, emerging innovations in public health, and critical appraisal of current research. Offered every fall semester.

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Public Health Studies or Social Work.

Enrollment limited to students in a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

PHS 6930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

PHS 6970 - Advanced Research Topics

Credit(s): 1-4 Credits

PHS 6980 - Advanced Grad Reading Course

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

PHS 6990 - Dissertation Research

Credit(s): 0-12 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

PUBH 5010 - Mission and Practice of Global Public Health

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the context of public health practice, including its legal basis, history, mission, the core functions of public health, and institutional structure of public health practice. Theoretical and practical perspectives are presented to illustrate the workings of public health at local, state, national, and global levels. Cross-listed with SWRK 5010.

PUBH 5030 - Methodological Approaches to Understanding Population Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores the determinants of a population’s health focusing on the analytic methods used to help identify, understand, and address inequities in health at the organizational, community, and societal levels. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and selecting appropriate quantitative and qualitative data collection methods for a given public health context while considering study design, sampling, causality, and threats to validity. Students will learn to interpret results of data analysis and translate this information to practice through reading the literature and considering how evidence is used to inform health policy, address population health challenges, and communicate with diverse audiences.

PUBH 5040 - Generating Evidence from Public Health Data

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course introduces students to the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge, and the role of qualitative and quantitative analytic methods in describing and comparing health determinants and outcomes in a variety of public health contexts. The course has three primary focus areas: data collection, data analysis, and interpretation and communication of results. Course topics include study design and sampling, questionnaire development, data visualization, and statistical inference and modeling. Students will use software to analyze data and will learn how to appropriately report on findings both in writing and orally.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

PUBH 5050 - Health Care Across the Life Course: From Policy to Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of and orientation to the US health care and public health delivery systems with a specific focus on access, delivery and utilization across the life course. Topics include the delivery, financing, regulation, and administration of health care and public health services for diverse health care organizational structures. The intersection of population health, public health, health policy, and advocacy will be discussed in relation to health services delivery.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

PUBH 5060 - Environmental and Biological Determinants of Health

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course addresses the interaction of the physical, biological, and social environments of individuals in which they work and live. It presents a broad survey of the major environmental issues facing contemporary society in both developed and developing countries. The course combines an overall ecological perspective with specific elements related to personal and community health, emphasizing the interrelatedness of the two and conveying an awareness of how current environmental issues directly affect our lives.

Attributes: Social Work PhD Specilization

PUBH 5070 - Translating Evidence and Theory for Community Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Assessment, planning, implementing and evaluating health promotion and health education programs are key skills to master in order to function effectively as a public health professional. Assessing community needs helps determine appropriate approaches for addressing needs. Using evidence and theory enhances the likelihood of program effectiveness. Evaluating programs is critical in order to ensure they are maximally effective and efficacious and able to be sustained over time for lasting improvements in health. This course provides an overview of these core public health competencies to prepare students to function effectively in public health practice.

PUBH 5110 - Managerial Aspects of Public Health Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course presents concepts and methods of management tools useful for directing a public health agency. Topics concerning organizational design, finance and budgeting, human resources management, public relations, quality improvement, and planning are presented with examples primarily focused on state and local public health practice.

Prerequisite(s): PUBH 5010

PUBH 5500 - Place and Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course focuses on providing information and working knowledge to public health officers, healthcare professionals, and researchers. It incorporates the basic understanding and application of GIS to analyzing and addressing public health issues. It is intended for graduate level students and will provide information and experience to understand the basic concepts, language, and methodologies of GIS as it relates to the public health arena. This course will provide a platform of knowledge and experience from which informed decisions concerning GIS, public health studies, and designs can be made. This is a culminating experience in public health and GIS training.

PUBH 5600 - GIS and Public Health

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This is an introductory course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and its application in the Public Health arena. Historically, the public health system has relied on three components to accomplish its vital role in the community of mankind. These three components are comprised of public health workforce, the structure that supports and maintains these dedicated workers and the information and communication systems used by these organizations in collecting and disseminating accurate data for the decision-makers and the public. This course will explore portions of the last component of this mix. It will delve into the basic structure of geographic information systems (GIS), define GIS as a technology -- a computer -based system for integrating and analyzing geographic data -- and explore the concept that geographic patterns are inherent in data and relationships between features.

PUBH 5620 - Politics and Public Health Advocacy

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Public health is inherently a political discipline. Practitioners require an understanding of the way public opinion and legislation on matters of public health are shaped. This course exposes students to the basics of public health policy, coalition-building, written and verbal advocacy tools, and includes several real-world experiences of advocacy work.

PUBH 5910 - Practice Experience in Public Health

Credit(s): 0 or 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course provides supervised experience in application of public health techniques through work in a public health agency or other health care organization.

PUBH 5930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

PUBH 5950 - Special Study for Examinations

Credit(s): 0 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Registration in this class indicates student has completed coursework required to sit for the Certified in Public Health exam in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): PUBH 5010 with a grade of C or higher; PUBH 5030 with a grade of C or higher; (PUBH 5040 with a grade of C or higher or BST 5020 with a grade of C or higher); (PUBH 5050* with a grade of C or higher or HMP 5000* with a grade of C or higher); PUBH 5060* with a grade of C or higher; (PUBH 5070* with a grade of C or higher, BSH 5000* with a grade of C or higher, or BSH 5400* with a grade of C or higher); HCE 5020* with a grade of C or higher

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

PUBH 5960 - Capstone in Public Health Practice

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This culminating experience requires students to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired across the MPH curriculum to a situation approximating some aspect of professional practice. Each student will prepare a major paper focused on a program, service, or policy related to a significant public health problem or issue.

PUBH 5970 - Research Topics in Public Health Practice

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course provides direct research experience in public health. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

PUBH 5980 - Graduate Reading

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course provides specialized study in public health to enhance skills in literature review and problem solving. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

PUBH 5985 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course provides an independent study. Content is developed jointly between the student(s) and a faculty mentor.

PUBH 5990 - Research Project

Credit(s): 0-2 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This course is an independent directed research project that culminates the Master of Science in Public Health. Under the guidance of the academic advisor and other qualified mentor(s), each student designs and implements a research project commensurate with their professional training and interests, using the skills developed in the Masters of Science in Public Health curriculum.


Apply for Admission

For additional admission questions, please contact:
Bernie Backer
Director of Graduate Recruitment and Admissions 
bernard.backer@slu.edu 
314-977-8144