Law (LAW)

Note: Law courses are limited to law students only.

LAW 7000 - Civil Procedure I

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course provides a basic introduction to the process of civil litigation. During fall semester students will learn about the procedural rules governing different stages in the litigation process - from initial pleadings through final judgment. The main topics to be covered are: pleading, discovery, and adjudication without trial, trial and appeal. In the spring we will address: personal jurisdiction, subject matter jurisdiction, venue, Erie doctrine, res judicata and joinder.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of First Year Law, LLM Masters Program, First Year Law PT Evening, Second Year Law PT, First Year Law PT Day or Second Year Law PT Day.

LAW 7001 - Civil Procedure II

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides a basic introduction to the process of civil litigation. During fall semester students will learn about the procedural rules governing different stages in the litigation process - from initial pleadings through final judgment. The main topics to be covered are: pleading, discovery, and adjudication without trial, trial and appeal. In the spring we will address: personal jurisdiction, subject matter jurisdiction, venue, Erie doctrine, res judicata and joinder.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of First Year Law, LLM Masters Program, First Year Law PT Evening, Second Year Law PT, First Year Law PT Day or Second Year Law PT Day.

LAW 7005 - Criminal Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The goals of punishment, principles of criminal responsibility, and selected specific crimes will be approached via study and analysis of the Model Penal Code as well as of the Common Law doctrine.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of First Year Law, LLM Masters Program, First Year Law PT Evening, Second Year Law PT, First Year Law PT Day or Second Year Law PT Day.

LAW 700M - Intro/Civil Law Systems (PL)

Credit(s): 1-2 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the civil law tradition as it has developed in today’s continental European and Latin-American legal systems. The aim is to help American students understand the language and concepts of the other major legal tradition in the Western culture, together with the common law. Students will be introduced to historical sources of the civil law tradition, and will gain an understanding of how and why the tradition of codified law developed on the European continent and Latin America in contrast to the common law tradition in England and the United States. The basic structure, principles and jurisprudence of the civil law systems will be explored and compared to those of the common law, leading the student to appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of both traditions. Students will also study the areas in which trends toward convergence or divergence of civil law and common law can be identified, and the questions they raise in the context of the European unification process. Particular attention will be given to the development of the civil law tradition in Spain, as well as to EU legal institutions. The course will not presuppose any knowledge of the civil law tradition or comparative law.

LAW 7010 - Contracts I

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course covers the legal principles of formation of simple contracts, consideration, offer and acceptance.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of First Year Law, LLM Masters Program, First Year Law PT Evening, Second Year Law PT, First Year Law PT Day or Second Year Law PT Day.

LAW 7011 - Contracts II

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course covers statute of frauds, the parole evidence rule; performance and breach of contract; excuses for failure to perform; illegality; discharge of duties; third party beneficiaries; assignments.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of First Year Law, LLM Masters Program, First Year Law PT Evening, Second Year Law PT, First Year Law PT Day or Second Year Law PT Day.

LAW 7015 - Torts

Credit(s): 4 Credits

Development and analysis of accident liability systems. Historical roots of common law liability. Strict liability systems, including nuisance, trespass, respondeat superior. Negligence, with attention to standards of conduct, proof of breach, causation, 'proximate cause,' affirmative defenses and immunities. Functional approach to accident law doctrine. Explanatory structure developed wherein 'strict liability, negligence, intentional torts' appear as rough benchmarks along a continuum rather than as warring, alien, liability systems. Damages, liability of owners and occupiers of land, assault, battery, false imprisonment, malicious prosecution and other 'intentional torts,' liability of suppliers of goods and remote contractors, misrepresentation, and defamation. The explanatory structure of torts is further developed in analyzing legal treatment of various 'accident types, ' with increasing focus upon 'legal process' topics, issue characterization, burden allocation, and the relations among tort, contract, and administrative allocation systems.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of First Year Law, LLM Masters Program, First Year Law PT Evening, Second Year Law PT, First Year Law PT Day or Second Year Law PT Day.

LAW 7020 - Legal Research and Writing I

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Introduction to the legal system; analysis of the judicial, legislative and administrative processes; basic legal sources; techniques of legal research; use of digests, reporters, encyclopedias, annotated cases, statutes, citators and reference books; methods of legal analysis and approaching research problems; writing style and technique; various memoranda and appellate briefs, oral arguments.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of First Year Law, LLM Masters Program, First Year Law PT Evening, Second Year Law PT, First Year Law PT Day or Second Year Law PT Day.

LAW 7021 - Legal Research and Writing II

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Introduction to the legal system; analysis of the judicial, legislative and administrative processes; basic legal sources; techniques of legal research; use of digests, reporters, encyclopedias, annotated cases, statutes, citators and reference books; methods of legal analysis and approaching research problems; writing style and technique; various memoranda and appellate briefs, oral arguments.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of First Year Law, LLM Masters Program, First Year Law PT Evening, Second Year Law PT, First Year Law PT Day or Second Year Law PT Day.

LAW 7025 - Constitutional Law I

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Constitutional Law I is the study of the Supreme Court's authority, justifiability, national powers, (the Commerce Clause, other powers of Congress), states' power to regulate commerce, intergovernmental immunities and separation of powers through analysis of the Supreme Court's process of constitutional interpretation.

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of First Year Law, LLM Masters Program, First Year Law PT Evening, Second Year Law PT, First Year Law PT Day or Second Year Law PT Day.

LAW 7030 - Property

Credit(s): 2 or 4 Credits

Legal concepts of ownership and possession; finding; bailment; adverse possession; relationship of landlord and tenant; concurrent ownership; restraints on transferability of land; common law estates and future interests; private limits on the use of land; nuisance; easements and profits; licenses; covenants running with the land; introduction to public control of land use, zoning, eminent domain; introduction to intellectual property.

LAW 7035 - Legal Methods

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explicitly examines the analytical process needed to solve legal problems. Because it is difficult to separate process from substance, the course will consider the building blocks of legal reasoning within the context of problems that arise in certain first year substantive courses. Specific competencies include analogical and deductive reasoning, application of law to facts, issue spotting and exam taking.

LAW 7040 - Introduct to Legal Studies I

Credit(s): 0.5 Credits

This year long course will introduce the first year law student to the skills necessary for a successful academic experience in law school (those skills include case reading and briefing, note taking in class, outlining, exam preparation, exam writing, time management, etc.) In the fall the course will introduce important academic skills in lectures, and those skills are then reinforced in structured study groups run by Teaching Fellows selected from the second and third year class. This course will afford the first year student with the opportunity to obtain a strong understanding of what skills are necessary to achieve academic success and to become proficient in using those skills in the first year and beyond.

LAW 7041 - Introduct to Legal Studies II

Credit(s): 0.5 Credits

This year long course will introduce the first year law student to the skills necessary for a successful academic experience in law school (those skills include case reading and briefing, note taking in class, outlining, exam preparation, exam writing, time management, etc.). In the spring the first year law student will have an opportunity to reflect on his or her first semester exam performance and target any specific areas of academic weakness, with the opportunity to remediate those targeted areas. This course will afford the first year student with the opportunity to obtain a strong understanding of what skills are necessary to achieve academic success and to become proficient in using those skills in the first year and beyond.

LAW 7045 - Advanced Legal Methodology

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This course will provide an introduction to the Multistate Performance Test, as well as a general overview of the analytic legal process.

LAW 7050 - Jurisprudence (Philosophy of Law) (PL)

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

Generally, this course focuses on the study of the leading legal philosophers and schools of jurisprudence; the application of basic legal theories of the various schools to the solutions of contemporary legal problems; and on analysis of current decisions for their jurisprudential premises. Individual faculty members may focus on particular schools of jurisprudence.

LAW 7055 - American Legal History (PL)

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores major themes in the history of American law from the colonial period to the present: how American legal culture emerged out of an imperial background, was transformed amidst national expansion in the nineteenth century, and evolved in response to ideological and social pressures in the twentieth. The course focuses on law internally, looking at its personnel and sources, as well as externally, or how it relates to the larger social and political cultures around it. Recurrent themes include the adaptation of law as people move across space, the professional identity of the lawyer, the changing literary sources of law, the relative autonomy of law in relation to other cultural phenomena, and the power of law as an agent of social transformation.

LAW 705M - European Human Rights Law (PL)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course provides an overview of the protection of civil and political rights in Europe, including those protected by both the European Convention on Human Rights and European Union law. It will focus on recent developments, including the Lisbon Treaty (effective December 2009) and the situation of new and old democracies since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. It will also examine the case law of the European Court of Human Rights and the Court of Justice of the European Union. Some selected areas shall be emphasized, such as the right to life and physical integrity, international migrations, and linguistic, religious and cultural pluralism.

LAW 7060 - Anthropology of Law (PL)

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course focuses on the application of anthropological theory to understanding of how law works in social context, and on analyzing interrelationships between legal solutions and contemporary social problems. Anthropological materials will include materials from other cultural contexts and jurisdictions, as well as from the United States. The course will also include materials from a variety of substantive areas, including but not limited to health law, criminal law, business associations, environmental law, civil procedure, and property. This course will serve students interested in international and comparative law; health law; urban issues; law and society; and the interdisciplinary study of law. One overarching theme of the course will be the nature of power and interrelationships between language, power, and law.

LAW 7100 - Legal Profession

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The law governing lawyers, with special attention paid to the A.B.A. Model Rules of Professional Conduct, and the law of legal malpractice.

LAW 7105 - Evidence

Credit(s): 4 Credits

This course will cover the origin and effect of rules governing the admission and exclusion of evidence, competence of witnesses and function of court and jury with emphasis on the Federal Rules of Evidence.

LAW 7110 - Business Associations

Credit(s): 4 Credits

Business Associations is a survey course designed to provide an introduction to the law of agency, general partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. Both state and federal regulation of corporations will be studied, including state fiduciary duty law and federal securities regulation. Materials used will include state and federal court decisions, statutes, regulations, and organizational documents of various types of business associations. Both planning and litigation issues arising in the law of business associations will be covered.

LAW 7115 - Wills and Trusts

Credit(s): 4 Credits

Intestate succession; family protection and restrictions on freedom of testation; execution of wills; problems of incorporation by reference and extrinsic evidence; revocation and revival of wills; problems of construction in the distribution of estates; contracts to make wills; will substitutes; the nature, use and varieties of trusts; elements of a trust; creation of trusts; the nature of a trust beneficiary's interest; modification and termination of trusts; charitable trusts; fiduciary administration; probate and contest of wills; rights and duties of estate and trust fiduciaries.

LAW 7120 - Commercial Transactions

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course covers the law of commercial paper (checks, drafts, and other negotiable instruments under the Uniform Commercial Code; commercial terms, commercial aspects of performance and remedies under Article 2; Negotiable Instruments (Article 3); and Bank Deposits and Collections (Article 4).

LAW 7125 - Constitutional Law II

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Constitutional Law II focuses on equal protection and substantive due process claims and doctrine under the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution. The course also considers constitutional doctrine under the Takings Clause, Contracts Clause, Second Amendment, and Fourteenth Amendment Privileges or Immunities Clause, and will introduce students to the Free Speech, Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses of the First Amendment. In addressing these subjects, it considers various modes of constitutional analysis and argument and a range of constitutional concepts.

LAW 7130 - First Amendment

Credit(s): 2-3 Credits

This course is a comprehensive and in-depth study of First Amendment issues including regulation of political speech, expression in public places, 'symbolic' speech, libel, obscenity, commercial speech, and free press.

LAW 7140 - Secured Transactions

Credit(s): 2 Credits

A study of the laws governing secured credit transactions with primary focus on the Uniform Commercial Code. This course examines debtor creditor relations in both business and individual settings and includes a study of creation and perfection of security interests, default and enforcement issues, documentation concerns, and other devices to enhance credit quality.

LAW 7145 - Federal Courts

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course considers the role of the federal courts within the federal governmental system. In part, the class studies the allocation of power among governmental institutions and the relationships between the states and the federal government. In related part, the class examines the institutional design of the federal courts themselves – the scope and limits of their power, the structure of the judicial system, the practice and procedure followed in the federal courts, and the challenges confronting federal courts today. Topics covered will include the original and appellate jurisdiction of the federal courts, Congressional power to limit the jurisdiction of the federal courts, Congressional power to create “legislative courts” outside of Article III, Supreme Court review of judgments, state sovereign immunity, abstention, and federal habeas corpus. Other concepts will be addressed as well. This course builds on the skills and knowledge gained in other law school classes – particularly Civil Procedure and Constitutional Law I.

LAW 7150 - Remedies

Credit(s): 0-4 Credits

Problems in legal and equitable remedies, including damages, restitution, injunction and contempt.

LAW 7155 - Taxation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Federal income tax problems of individuals; gross income; exclusions; deductions; employee benefits; gains and losses; taxable persons; rates and returns; practice and procedure. Introduction to a comprehensive statutory scheme, a methodology for approaching that scheme; tax planning, tax research, and business terminology and time value.

LAW 7160 - Real Estate Transactions

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Contractual, financing, title and tax considerations of residential and commercial real estate transactions; problems in the development, financing, leasing and disposition of real estate; brief consideration of bankruptcy and environmental law issues; use of planning and legal concepts to accomplish land development objectives in a transactional setting; introduction to the drafting and negotiation of real estate documentation.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7030

LAW 7165 - Administrative Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course looks at constitutional problems raised by the creation of administrative agencies; policy making and investigations by such agencies; administrative jurisdiction; hearings; decisions and enforcement of decisions; role of the courts in reviewing administrative actions will be the focus of this course.

LAW 7170 - Conflict of Laws

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course covers the choice -of- law issue; recognition of judgments of other states. The emphasis will be on conflicts of law problems in the United States, but some international problems may also be considered. Jurisdiction may be included.

LAW 7175 - Family Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Legal relations of husband and wife with respect to person and property; conflict of laws; ante nuptial agreements; legal consequences of annulment, separation and divorce; separation agreements; division of property; alimony and maintenance; child support; child custody.

LAW 7199 - Advanced Legal Analysis and Strategies

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course will introduce and reinforce bar examination study and test taking skills. It will provide in depth exploration of each part of the bar exam (multiple choice (MBE), essay (MEE) and multi state performance exam (MPT) and build students’ skills regarding each part of the exam. In addition, the course will devote significant time to skills associated with analyzing, studying and memorizing the substantive information. A hallmark of this course will be intensive writing and feedback components. This course will provide at risk students with the opportunity to hone the skills necessary for effective bar exam study, passing the bar exam and eventual success as a practicing attorney. This course is pass/no pass.

LAW 7200 - Civil Rights Law

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course focuses on the litigation of constitutional claims under Section 1983, including the pretrial, discovery, and litigation issues facing attorneys representing individuals whose First, Fourth and Fourteenth Amendment rights have been violated. It will involve an examination of the most important substantive issues extant in civil rights litigation, including the 'state action doctrine', the foundation for liability under 42 USC Sec. 1983, the immunities enjoyed by government actors, and the liability of municipalities and other government entities.

LAW 720M - International Sale of Goods

Credit(s): 1 or 2 Credits

In today’s global marketplace, small and large businesses alike routinely engage in the cross-border purchase or sale of raw materials, supplies, equipment and finished goods. Every commercial lawyer must be prepared to counsel clients on sales transactions across national borders. This course will help you get there. It covers a variety of issues that arise when contracting parties have their places of business in different countries or the goods that are the subject of the transaction cross at least one national border. The main focus is the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG), an important body of international sales law in effect in the United States, in Spain, and for most significant U.S. trading partners. We will look carefully at important provisions of the CISG, while considering the many different roles played by a commercial lawyer at various stages of an international sales transaction.

LAW 7210 - Electronic Discovery

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Electronic Discovery provides an in-depth treatment of the legal, technical, and cost management issues involving identification, preservation, collection, review, and production of electronically stored information (“ESI”) in civil litigation. This course will cover how the federal rules of civil procedure, such as the 2006 FRCP ESI amendments: (Rules 26 meet and confer, 34 production, and 37 sanctions), and the Federal Rules of Evidence, such as FRE 502 (privilege review and production), along with the rapidly developing ESI case law affect this important aspect of litigation. This course will also cover state e-discovery rules, the emerging best practices from the Sedona Conference Cooperation Proclamation, the Electronic Discovery Reference Model, and other e-discovery authorities. Demonstrations utilizing technology will occur when appropriate to provide a practice-ready learning environment for the students.

LAW 725M - Doing Business/Emerg Mkts (PL)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

In this course, students will examine some of the significant legal and business issues that arise when companies engage in business transactions in emerging markets. In addition to an overview of the challenges of doing business in an emerging market, the course will include coverage of compliance with anticorruption law, protection of intellectual property, financing transactions, planning for dispute resolution, and corporate social responsibility. Particular attention will likely be given to doing business in Russia and other former Soviet states, China, and certain jurisdictions in Latin America.

LAW 7300 - Criminal Procedure: Investigation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course concerns the constitutional limitations imposed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments on police and prosecution during the investigative stages of the criminal process.

LAW 7305 - Criminal Procedure: Adjudication

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course will cover constitutional and statutory laws relating to the criminal trial such as pretrial release, the decision to prosecute, preliminary hearing, grand jury, discovery and disclosure, guilty pleas, trial and appeal.

LAW 730M - Protect Rights New Democr (PL)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Due process of law has a bearing on the structure of the State itself and, indirectly, on constitutional principles beyond the protection of individual rights. In this course, students will examine the procedural and substantive due process rights in Europe, and in so doing, will better understand the European legal culture and its administration of justice. How are those rights that are enshrined in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments of the US Constitution understood in Europe? To explore that question, this course will focus on the following issues: the independence and impartiality of judges, the concept of fair trial (in administrative, civil and criminal proceedings), the right to be heard, the right to have an effective remedy against violations of rights, the meaning of witness crossexamination, and the scope of the ne bis in idem – all to be addressed in a transnational setting from a comparative point of view. The European Convention of Human Rights and the case law of the European Court of Human Rights play an essential role in defining due process in Europe, a role that has been recognized in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. Although the European Union is far from being a federal system, the definition of a common concept of due process enables recognition of common features in all national legal systems.

LAW 7310 - Federal Criminal Prosecution (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course will offer a practical overview of the criminal justice system from the perspective of the public prosecutor, specifically examining issues that arise in investigating and prosecuting a federal criminal case. Students will be immersed in the factual and legal background of an actual federal criminal prosecution, and will be called upon to assume the role of prosecutor from the initial meeting with the investigating agent through the ultimate sentencing hearing. In the role of prosecutor, students will engage in substantial drafting exercises, including the drafting of a prosecution memorandum, indictment, motion for pretrial detention, discovery letter, response to suppression motion, speedy trial memorandum, pretrial motion in limine, plea agreement, and sentencing memorandum. Students will participate in various mock proceedings, from the grand jury presentment through the bond hearing, suppression hearing, guilty plea hearing and ultimately the sentencing hearing. Each of the topics covered during the 14 week course will introduce students to the varied and challenging factual, legal, and ethical issues that arise in criminal prosecution on a daily basis. The materials for this course will include the actual physical evidence from a federal criminal case involving illegal firearm and drug charges. Students will meet and interview an actual federal special agent. Students will utilize various federal criminal statutes in Titles 18 and 21 of the United States Code, Department of Justice policies and forms, the United States Sentencing Guidelines, and will research and review pertinent federal appellate court opinions.

LAW 735M - Cross Border Litig: Select Top

Credit(s): 1 Credit

The primary emphasis of this course will be the enforceability of judgments entered by a foreign jurisdiction. It will consider both the enforceability of non-U.S. judgments in American courts, and the enforceability of U.S. judgments in foreign courts. For purposes of contrast, it will also briefly cover the principles of Full Faith and Credit within the American system. Special attention will be paid to: (1) the role of treaties and international agreements (including the Brussels regime), (2) the intersection between questions of enforceability and foreign relations, and (3) specific inter-systemic features that bear on enforceability (for example, American efforts to ensure compliance with fundamental constitutional norms and foreign resistance to American punitive damage awards). Other topics related to cross-border litigation, including choice of law and personal jurisdiction, will also be discussed.

LAW 7400 - Accounting for Lawyers

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course provides an introduction to basic financial accounting, auditing, and finance. Accounting topics will include basic accounting procedures and principles, and the analysis of basic financial statements including the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. Auditing will focus on the role of the auditor and the meaning of audit reports. Finance topics will include 'time value of money' issues and business valuation topics. All topics will emphasize implications for the legal profession. This course is limited to those students with no previous background in accounting or finance. This course is pass/no pass.

LAW 7405 - Transactional Drafting for Business Associations (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course is intended to train students to understand concepts and develop practical skills necessary for an effective transactional law practice. Students will supplement their study of doctrine in the Business Associations course with drafting exercises covering contracts and other types of documents commonly encountered by business lawyers in practice. Students will learn the fundamentals of 1) using effective written communication with clients and opposing counsel; 2) understanding legal forms and commonly encountered contract provisions; and 3) drafting, revising and reviewing organizational documents for partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations; buy-sell agreements; shareholder proxies; shareholder voting agreements; corporate board resolutions; merger agreements; and legal opinions. Students are required to be enrolled concurrently in Business Associations with Professor Wagner.

LAW 740M - Global Health Law (PL)

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

This course will introduce the major actors, institutions and legal arrangements in global health. It will also consider hotly contested global health issues, including controlling the international spread of infectious disease, making basic health care and public health services available to all, defining a human right to health, financing health programs, providing access to patented drugs, and regulating the abuse of tobacco and alcohol. The course will emphasize the role of partnerships and other institutional innovations in promoting global health and as a model for addressing other global challenges through a series of interactive case studies and simulations.

LAW 7410 - Bankruptcy

Credit(s): 2-3 Credits

We will study the laws governing the relationship between debtors and creditors with primary focus on the Bankruptcy Code. This course examines debtor creditor relations in both business and individual settings and includes a study of the causes of financial distress, the goals of debt restructuring and rehabilitation of individual debtors, and the rights of creditors and others affected by the Bankruptcy process.

LAW 7420 - Securities Regulation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course is recommended for students interested in business law practice, both transactional and litigation oriented. It will cover the essential steps in financing business through the offering of securities, among other topics. In particular, this course will examine the federal regulation of the issuance, distribution and trading of securities under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including the following topics: the purpose and scope of the federal securities law; the role of the Securities and Exchange Commission; the concept of materiality; the underwriting process; disclosure in the registration statement and prospectus for public offerings; managed disclosure rules during public offerings; exemptions from registration; private placements of securities; secondary distributions; periodic reporting requirements; the proxy rules; civil and criminal liability under the anti-fraud rules; the prohibition on insider trading; professional duties of securities lawyers. This course may also cover selected aspects of broker-dealer, investment company and investment adviser regulation. It will include a discussion on the causes of the U.S. financial crisis of 2008 and reform of the U.S. financial system through the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7110*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

LAW 7425 - Advanced Commercial and Business Transactions Practice (E)

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

The course has two primary goals. First, as a general matter, the course examines the common substantive elements and structure of commercial and business contracts, and the drafting skills necessary to produce such contracts, the knowledge of which is essential to a sophisticated commercial and business transactional practice. Second, and more specifically, the course provides students with the substantive legal knowledge and contract drafting skills needed to conduct a stock purchase transaction and a secured loan transaction. Accordingly, the course reviews the substantive commercial and business laws implicated in a typical stock purchase transaction and a typical commercial loan transaction, and is structured around analyzing and drafting a model stock purchase agreement and a commercial lending agreement and their respective supporting documents. Because of the high level of interaction between students and the professor during class, attending every class is extraordinarily important. There will be frequent negotiating and writing/drafting assignments. Students will be graded on written assignments and class participation. The course is open only to students who have taken (1) Secured Transactions AND (2) Business Associations. The course is recommended only for those students who intend to engage in a commercial law or business law practice.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7140 and LAW 7110

LAW 7430 - Entrepreneurship Law (E)

Credit(s): 2-3 Credits

This course will provide students with insights into entrepreneurship and the legal rules applicable to entrepreneurial ventures. Representing entrepreneurial ventures is different in practice from representing large corporations and their shareholders. This course will provide simulated experiences, through various problems and case studies, which will allow students to provide legal representation for entrepreneurs in situations that a new company encounters from inception and initial growth to exiting the company. These simulations will include consideration of business and legal issues, strategy, and implications of potential actions.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7110

LAW 7445 - Corporate Finance

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course combines traditional lecture/discussion with business transaction contract drafting. The course introduces students to economic and financial concepts, including time value of money, financial leverage, business valuation, options and other financial products. In addition, the course addresses both issues affecting closely-held businesses, including choice of entity, and the more traditional corporate finance materials relating to mergers and takeovers of publicly traded entities.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7110

LAW 7450 - Modern Consumer Law

Credit(s): 2 Credits

The course will focus on types of consumer transactions such as mortqages and payday loans as well as various kinds of laws and regulations such as disclosure and efforts to prohibit practices. It will examine practical and theoretical questions and will explore consumer law as a series of statutes built on the common law foundations of contract and tort. This course will examine federal and state law governing the formation, terms and enforcement of consumer contracts. Topics covered will include deception and information in contract formation; regulation of consumer credit, goods and services; creditors' collection tactics; and consumer remedies. The course will deal with these topics from both a transactional and litigative perspective. Throughout the course we will consider the appropriate level of consumer regulation and its impacts.

LAW 745M - Inform Privacy Law in EU (PL)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This course will provide a background understanding of the EU’s foundational data protection laws and many of the important decisions that have arisen under the 1995 EU Data Protection Directive. At the same time, it will look forward to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) to anticipate the changes that will affect companies, governments, and people doing business within the EU. Special attention will be paid to the GDPR regulations for personal health data, biomedical research, and employment files.

LAW 7500 - Corporate Taxation

Credit(s): 2-3 Credits

This course exposes students to the basic tax questions involved when operating in corporate form; organization; capital structure; distributions; sales; redemptions; liquidations; collapsibles; tax research; tax planning opportunities and objectives. The course in Partnership taxation and not this course covers Subchapter S of the Internal Revenue Code. Taxation is a prerequisite; Business Associations is also a prerequisite but may be taken concurrently.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7155 and LAW 7110*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

LAW 7505 - Partnership Taxation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Basic tax questions involved when operating in partnership form; organization; capital structure; distributions; sales; liquidations; redemptions; tax planning opportunities; and comparison with S corporations.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7155

LAW 7508 - Introduction to Business Entities Taxation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the federal income tax concepts and statutes governing the formation, operation and liquidation of business entities, including corporations, partnerships, and limited liability companies. Students who have already taken Corporate Taxation or Partnership Taxation are not eligible to take this course.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7155

LAW 7510 - International Taxation (PL)

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course covers the fundamental principles of the U.S. income taxation of U.S. entities, citizens and residents operating, investing or working outside the U.S. and of entities, citizens and residents of other countries operating, investing or working in the U.S. The course addresses double taxation, fiscal incentives for investment and income tax treaties. The instructor may waive the Taxation prerequisite for LL.M. students who have taken one or more courses in taxation in their home countries or a third country.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7155

LAW 7520 - Wealth Transfer Taxation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will examine problems in Federal estate, gift and generation skipping taxation; income taxation of trusts and estates; special emphasis on tax planning affecting intra-family transfers, both inter vivos and testamentary; related problems presented by such transfers.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7115* and LAW 7155

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

LAW 7530 - Estate Planning (E)

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental tax and non-tax aspects of the practice of estate planning. The course will emphasize planning and drafting to achieve client objectives. The grade for this course will be based on problems, exercises and drafting exercises related to a set of case studies involving a broad array of client situations.

LAW 7600 - Intellectual Property Survey

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will provide a broad based introduction to the three traditionally recognized categories of intellectual property: patent, trademark, and copyright. Students will be exposed to the types of protection the legal system offers for inventions, creative expressions, and indications of origin. The course will cover basic issues presented in each area, and will deal with the prevailing justifications for offering the carious modes of protection and analyze recurring themes, such as the trade-off between incentive to create and public access.

LAW 7605 - Copyright

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course covers the law of copyright and related doctrines. In particular, it addresses the nature and extent of the federal copyright power; the scope of federal preemption of state regulation of creative works; the types of works protected under the federal Copyright Act and the nature of the rights accorded those works; the scope of a copyright owner's rights and the actions that infringe those rights under the Copyright Act and more recent statutory provisions like the Digital Millennium Copyright Act; secondary liability for infringing acts committed by others; the fair use doctrine; and the free speech interests of speakers and listeners.

LAW 7610 - Patent Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will focus on the historical background of patent law; unpatentable subject matters; law of secrecy and confidential relationships; classes of patentable subject matter; conditions of patentability; interferences, statutory provision and patent prosecution procedures; infringement; assignments and licensing; misuse of patents and antitrust violations; defenses and remedies.

LAW 7615 - Trademark and Unfair Competition

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will provide an in-depth treatment of trademark and unfair competition law, including protection of trademarks and trade dress, trademark and trade dress infringement, trademark dilution, misappropriation and unfair competition, and the right of publicity. The course will also develop and analyze the theories underlying the various modes of protections. This course is not open to students who enrolled in the Trademark Seminar, and students who do enroll in this course will be excluded from registering for the Trademark Seminar in the future.

LAW 7620 - Anatomy of a Patent (E)

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

This course introduces students to the process of preparing and prosecuting a patent application, and determining infringement of an issued patent. The approach follows the patent application and prosecution process from client interview, preparation of the patent specification and claims, and prosecution to patent issuance. Students will have regular drafting assignments for class meetings. Grades will be based on a combination of class participation, the drafting assignments, and a take-home drafting assignment at semester's end. Please note that while this course will expose students to material in patent preparation, prosecution and infringement, it is not designed as an USPTO patent registration exam preparation course. Moreover, while certain relatively simple scientific/technical exercises will be involved, students are not necessarily required to possess the same technical/scientific credentials required for the USPTO patent agent/attorney registration process.

LAW 7625 - Intellectual Property Law Research (E)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Intellectual Property Law Research will provide an in-depth and hands-on review of the legal research materials and techniques specific to the practice of copyright, trademark, patent, and other areas of intellectual property law. The course will explore relevant legislation and legislative history, regulations and regulatory history, agency decisions and websites, case law, treatises, practice materials, and electronic databases. Strategies for ensuring efficient and comprehensive research in intellectual property law - including methods of keeping up to date with changes, developments, and news - will also be covered.

LAW 7700 - Land Use Control

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Land Use Control will focus on the limitations on the use of land through government action; traditional techniques of planning, zoning and subdivision regulations; new developments including use of property tax for land use control; historic preservation, transfer of development rights, growth of regional and statewide statutory regulations, neighborhood collaborative planning, and the relationship of land use regulation to environmental regulation.

LAW 7705 - State and Local Government Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Exercise of state and local government powers in a federal system; sources of and limitations on these powers; impact of federal domestic policy shifts from grants to program devolution on local government power and integrity; resolution of intergovernmental conflicts; alternative solutions to metropolitan problems; contemporary problems of dissolution, annexation, fiscal operation, governmental liability, personnel matters, and citizen participation.

LAW 7720 - Environmental Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will cover environmental law with a primary emphasis upon relevant legal influences (common law, administrative law, international law, judicial deference, cooperative federalism, and constitutional law) on federal environmental law (RCRA, CERCLA, NEPA, ESA, Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act and environmental citizen suits). The course also will touch upon other themes and influences in environmental law - politics, environmental justice, economics, science and citizen participation - all of which tend to influence environmental decision making.

LAW 7735 - Urban Issues Symposium

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The Urban Issues Symposium is an interdisciplinary course open to students in architecture, law, business, social work and public policy. Students and faculty from Washington University and Saint Louis University work in interdisciplinary teams to respond to actual requests for proposals (RFPs) for development projects in the St. Louis region. Each team prepares a collaborative response to their assigned RFP. During class, faculty members and subject experts present on multi-disciplinary aspects of development projects to help guide the work of class teams.Successful responses to the RFPs require a holistic understanding of and engagement with the community, private property owners, various government agencies (e.g. streets and bikeways, economic development, planning design and use, housing), businesses, schools, and other relevant organizations and individuals. Components of the team response might include community participation, tax credit financing and other subsidies, collaborative planning, social capital building, design, land use, social services, environmental issues, and public-private partnerships. Interdisciplinary student teams are expected to meet regularly outside of class to discuss and prepare their team response to the RFPs. The grade for this course is not calculated in the G.P.A.

LAW 8000 - Health Care Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Health Care Law will focus on the legal regulation and liability of physicians and other health personnel; legal regulation of hospitals and other health institutions; government regulation of the cost and quality of health care; financing health care delivery; legal aspects of medical ethics.

LAW 8005 - Bioethics and the Law (PL)

Credit(s): 2-3 Credits

This course will examine the ethical and legal issues related to areas of health care decision making typically included in the field of bioethics. Specific issues that will be studied include determination of death, organ transplantation, end-of-life care, and genetics, among others. The course will introduce students to the leading approaches in analyzing the ethical issues involved, with a special emphasis on their influence in court cases and legislation. The course will also examine the processes that have been established to resolve questions in particular cases, including institutional ethics committees, for example.

LAW 8010 - Health Care Financing and Business Planning

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

This course focuses on regulatory and business aspects of health care practice. The course emphasizes how various areas of law (e.g., business associations, Medicare and Medicaid law, tax, antitrust, insurance regulation, Stark Law, fraud and abuse) impact the structure and finance of health care relationships and organizations. It also closely tracks implementation of federal and state health reform legislation. The course includes skills components focused on client advising, regulation, policy, as well as a final exam. Students must have either completed Health Care Law prior to enrolling in this course or be enrolled in Health Law during the same semester in which they take Health Care Finance.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 8000*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

LAW 8020 - Antitrust Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Antitrust is a study of the laws governing private restrictions on competition and efforts to promote competitiveness in the economy. Areas include: restraints of trade (e.g., price fixing, boycotts, market allocations); monopolization and attempted monopolization; mergers; remedies and enforcement. The course attempts to introduce students to the basic concepts (and limitations) of employing economic analysis in the law; however, no previous study of economics is required.

LAW 8022 - Antitrust & Health Care Mrkets

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Antitrust laws have a directive influence on the health care industry by constraining business conduct to preserve competition. As health care has constituted a progressively larger share of the national economy, the health care industry has become a primary target of the antitrust laws and a driver of antitrust enforcement policy. High-profile antitrust cases from the past decade have involved hospital mergers, drug pricing and patents, and the consolidation of health insurers. This course introduces the fundamental principles of antitrust law and identifies the antitrust issues and concepts that lawyers in health care contexts deal with most frequently. Fundamental antitrust principles covered include monopolization, mergers and acquisitions, cartels and professionalism, joint ventures, price-fixing, exclusionary conduct, and private versus public enforcement. This course then explores the major applications of antitrust laws in health care contexts, examining how competition policy interacts with health care costs and shapes business practices in the markets for medical services, medical products, and insurance for both.  This course employs a hybrid, condensed format, with approximately one third of the class work online and the remainder in three live half-day sessions.   The online portion of the class will rely entirely on the Blackboard site, as will all assignments, additional course materials, and course communications.  To receive credit for this course, all students must complete the online course work within the deadlines and attend the entirety of all live class sessions.  Students may complete the online module according to their own schedule at any point up to 7 days prior to the beginning of the live sessions.

LAW 8025 - Public Health Law (PL)

Credit(s): 2-3 Credits

This course examines the constitutional foundation for public health regulation in the United States, addressing both the governmental powers to protect the public’s health and individual rights that limit those powers. Additionally, the course will probe conflicts between public health and civil liberties that arise in injury and disease surveillance, in mandatory programs of screening, treatment and quarantine, in medical labeling and advertising, and in the regulation of commerce and property.

LAW 8030 - FDA Law and Policy

Credit(s): 2-3 Credits

This course explores legal and policy issues related to products regulated by the FDA. We will critically examine the regulatory framework for food, drugs, biologics, vaccines, medical devices, and cosmetics. We will also consider the relationship between the regulatory framework and other laws, such as patent, antitrust and products liability.

LAW 8035 - Disability Law (PL)

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Enabling people with disabilities to participate in society is a new civil rights frontier, built on the achievements of prior movements while confronting both comparable and distinct dilemmas. This course will provide an in-depth study of current issues in disability law and policy, with emphasis on the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and its amendments which prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, education, housing, transportation and health care.

LAW 8045 - HIPAA Privacy Law

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This course examines the health information confidentiality regulations that promulgate one portion of the Administrative Simplification provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), signed into law by President Clinton on August 21, 1996, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), signed into law by President Obama on February 17, 2009. The objectives of this course include learning how to identify, understand, and/or apply, as appropriate, the individuals and entities that fall within the HIPAA Privacy Rule’s definition of covered entities, business associates, and subcontractors; the definition of protected health information; methods for de-identifying protected health information; the level of patient permission needed before a covered entity may use or disclose protected health information for treatment, payment, health care operations, and public policy activities; the specific requirements that apply to research, marketing, and fundraising activities, as well as the sale of protected health information; the individual rights; the heightened confidentiality requirements that apply to psychotherapy notes, genetic information, and genetic test results; the administrative requirements; the requirements relating to business associates, subcontractors, and business associate agreements; the breach notification requirements; and the HIPAA Privacy enforcement process, including the complaint process, the audit process, and possible civil and criminal penalties. After completing this course, students will be equipped with the information and skills necessary to serve as an institutional HIPAA Privacy Officer or a government HIPAA Privacy Enforcement Officer and/or to provide outside counsel regarding HIPAA Privacy matters.

LAW 8055 - Transactional Health Care Practice (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course will focus on legal, business and strategic issues raised by the development and operation of various types of health care delivery structures and arrangements. The principal vehicles by which these will be explored will be through a series of drafting exercises. Approximately five such exercises will be required. In a number of instances second drafts will be mandated. Thus, for example, students will be required to take a complex legal document and summarize it in a manner that will be understandable to lay clients. Students will also negotiate agreements involving a variety of health care transactions, and draft letters of intent and related documents in teams representing various client groups-e.g. physicians, hospitals, third party payors and employers. Attorneys actively involved in transactional practices will supervise teams.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 8000

LAW 8065 - Fraud, Abuse and Health Care Regulation

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course will focus on a variety of regulatory schemes relevant to the health care industry from the institutional to individual level. In particular, this course will focus on the Medicare Fraud & Abuse Law, HIPAA regulations governing privacy and security of health information, federal and state Anti-kickback prohibitions, the Stark Law (both Stark I and Stark II Regulations), the Internal Revenue Service Rules imposed on not-for-profit health care institutions and Intermediate Sanctions, the False Claims Act, and a variety of other federal and state laws regulating health care transactions and licensure of health care providers. The course will meet two hours per week and students will be expected to complete and turn in proposed solutions to weekly problem sets using the relevant statutory provisions, regulations and guidance. The problems and solutions are evaluated by the professor, who is a practitioner in the area of health care law. In addition, students will have either a take home exam or substantial paper requirement as part of the course grade. Enrollment is limited.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 8000

LAW 8070 - Health Law, Policy and Advocacy I: Grassroots Advocacy, Consumer Education (E) (PL)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This is a service learning course in which students work with consumer health advocacy organizations on state and federal health policy initiatives, engaging in public education and legislative and administrative advocacy.  The classroom component covers substantive health law and policy and advocacy training.   Class speakers include high-level community advocates, elected officials and administrative agency officials.  The fieldwork involves community education and policy advocacy. In the fall class, fieldwork typically includes educating community groups, interviewing witnesses and writing briefing papers and action alerts on key issues.  This class is offered in the fall and spring semesters, with the spring semester course being a continuation of the fall.  Students must typically enroll in the fall semester course to be eligible to enroll in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 8000

LAW 8071 - Health Law, Policy and Advocacy II: Grassroots Advocacy, Legislative Advocacy (E)(PL)

Credit(s): 2-3 Credits

This is a service-learning course in which students will work with consumer health advocacy organizations on state and federal health policy initiatives, engaging in legislative and administrative advocacy and public education. The classroom component covers substantive health law and policy, and advocacy training. Class speakers include high-level community advocates, elected officials and administrative agency officials. The fieldwork component involves community education and policy advocacy. The spring class focuses on legislative advocacy before the Missouri General Assembly. The students prepare comments on pending bills and regulations and help consumer groups write and present testimony before legislative and administrative bodies.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 8000

LAW 8075 - Health Care Compliance and the Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Proactive regulatory compliance programs are, or soon will be, mandatory throughout the health care industry in the U.S. as a result of federal mandates. Effective compliance programs also are mandated by prudent business practices. This course is designed to introduce students to health care compliance. Students will learn the background and general theory of compliance, what health care compliance programs are, how they are developed, how they operate and the consequences of inadequate and ineffective compliance programs. Special attention will be paid to the role and operation of compliance programs – with respect to both routine compliance matters and those that are complaint-based. The roles and responsibilities of government enforcement agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the Inspector General, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services and state Medicaid agencies in defining, directing and overseeing compliance and corporate integrity programs will also be considered. The future of compliance programs, including the potential for collateral liabilities as a result of compliance activities, will be addressed. Methods of evaluation for this class include an in class presentation and a final exam.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 8000*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

LAW 8090 - Health Care Regulation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course will review the administrative regulation of health law. The course will discuss the intersection of health law and administrative law by discussing how administrative law concepts are applied in health law. The following Acts will be reviewed in the class: the Medicare Act, the Medicaid Act, the Emergency Treatment and Active Labor Act, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Controlled Substance Act. Prereq: Health Care Law. Strongly recommended: Administrative Law .

Prerequisite(s): LAW 8000

LAW 8200 - Labor Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will focus on the establishment of the collective bargaining relationship and the collective bargaining process, including selection of the union representative, grievance procedures under the labor contract, duty to bargain in good faith, security of employment, wages, hours, overtime premium pay, vacations and union security; legal status of labor contracts; legality of strikes, lockouts, picketing and secondary pressure; injunctions and damage suits in labor disputes; state and national legislation.

LAW 8205 - Employment Law

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course is a survey of the principal laws that regulate the employment relationship outside the context of a collective bargaining agreement. The topics covered include the establishment of the employment relationship including employee versus independent contractor status and the “employment-at-will” doctrine; the hiring process; the employer’s right to establish terms and conditions of employment; wage and hour regulation; employee privacy in the workplace (grooming and dress issues, freedom of expression, regulation of off-work activity); termination of the employment relationship including restrictions on post-employment activity; and the role of alternative dispute resolution processes in resolving employment law disputes. Emphasis is placed on the distinctions between the rights of governmental versus private sector employees; the overlapping roles of statutes, personnel policy manuals, and individual employment contracts in regulating employment; and the erosion of the “at-will” employment doctrine.

LAW 8210 - Employment Discrimination

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will provide an in-depth study of current problems in employment discrimination, including theories of discrimination, order and allocation of the burden of proof and other related issues; emphasis will be on Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and its amendments, with a brief discussion of other employment discrimination statutes.

LAW 8215 - Alternative Dispute Resolution

Credit(s): 2 Credits

The vast majority of lawsuits have always been resolved by a method other than trial. The last decades have witnessed the exponential increase of court-sponsored alternative dispute resolution programs, mainly court-ordered mediation and arbitration. This course will survey the more popular methods used to resolve disputes outside of litigation, including negotiation, mediation, arbitration, fact-finding summary jury trial and mini-trials. Students will consider the legal and conceptual bases of these processes, and learn the role of the attorney and how these processes work from prominent guest speakers, class discussions, video demonstrations and simulation exercises. The course will place more emphasis on the process and practice of law.

LAW 8220 - Workers' Compensation

Credit(s): 1 Credit

The object of this course is to provide a working understanding of the Workers' Compensation Act of Missouri. The course will cover the complete process of a Workers' Compensation case from Report of Injury to settlement or final award. It will also cover the appellate process of a case on appeal. Guest speakers (lawyers and judges) will present different aspects of a Workers' Compensation case. The course will also include a visit to the Workers' Compensation court to witness Mediations and Hearings.

LAW 8230 - Sports Law: Labor Wrangling Endorsement and the Art of the Deal

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course examines the legal and regulatory environment of professional and amateur sports, with a special focus on labor law issues and negotiation. The lawyer's expanding opportunities and responsibilities are explored in this $60 billion a year industry commanding expertise in numerous and diverse practice areas. A working knowledge of labor and contract law will be established and applied as class projects call students to 'represent' sports clients, such as: athletes, teams, coaches, leagues, etc. These class projects will heavily emphasize the students' negotiation skills and comfort with collective bargaining.

LAW 8235 - Information Privacy Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Information relating to businesses, private financial matters, medical history, and consumer activity is now generated and distributed at a furious pace. As the collection and use of information escalates, we are struggling as a society with the extent to which it should remain private, and as to whom. This course will provide an in-depth analysis of information privacy law, which involves a variety of different types of law (constitutional, tort, contract, property, statutory) that have developed to protect privacy in our information society. Some of the many topics covered include: media disclosures of private facts, private lives of public figures, conflicts between privacy and free speech, medical records, HIPAA, confidentiality of physician-patient relationships, genetic data, employee privacy, trade secrets, wiretapping, police records, surveillance, USA-Patriot Aact, monitoring of email, drug testing, searches, surveillance, database privacy, Internet monitoring, and identity theft.

LAW 8250 - Employee Benefits Law

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the tax, labor, and other regulatory and policy aspects of employee benefit plans - both pension and welfare plans. The principal tax and labor statutes governing eligibility, vesting, benefit accruals, nondiscrimination, deductions, funding, plan distributions, reporting and disclosure, fiduciary responsibility, prohibited transactions, and plan termination are considered. Benefit claims resolution, domestic relations orders, judicial review, and ERISA enforcement actions are examined, as are remedies and preemption.

LAW 8400 - International Law (PL)

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Nature, development, sources and scope of international law and organization of the modern community of nations; international agreements; rights and duties of states; nationality; jurisdiction; international claims; pacific settlement of disputes; law of the sea; use of force.

LAW 8410 - Immigration Law

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course covers core issues of immigration law and policy; family and employment related immigration; diversity immigrants; various categories of non-immigrants; inadmissibility; admission procedures; deportable aliens; deportation procedure and relief from deportation; refugees, as well, as issues of citizenship. The course will focus on the complex and intricate Immigration and Nationality Act, and will provide a valuable introduction to the administrative process so crucial to immigration procedures. Missouri State law affecting illegal immigrants will also be discussed, as needed.

LAW 8415 - Civil and Political Rights of Immigrants

Credit(s): 2 Credits

The influx of non-citizens in various communities across the United States has triggered a response by state and local governments towards promulgating laws and policies that affect the ability of non-citizens to integrate themselves into the social and economic fabric of society. Rudimentary and mundane, yet salient facets of life, such as employment, housing, public benefits, and personal security are typically taken for granted by U.S. citizens. However, the federal government vigorously regulates the provisioning of such basic necessities to non-citizens - with state and local governments increasingly doing so as well. Given the nature of federalism in the United States, the lines of power in the domain of immigration are sometimes muddied. However, there are areas in the scope of federal power to which the Supreme Court of the United States has given review and decisively made clear. Therefore, a number of important questions arise. Among those that we will explore in this course include the following: What rights do non-citizens have under the U.S. Constitution? Who has the power to regulate immigration? What about laws that affect immigrants, and thusly have an indirect impact on immigration? What happens when state and local governments pass laws that encroach upon federal power to regulate immigration directly; indirectly? To explore these questions, we will look at case law, statutory law, and federal regulations relating to employment, public benefits, wages, and housing.

LAW 8425 - National Security

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course surveys the doctrine, institutional framework, and conduct of national security across the three branches of government.  The course first covers the separation of national security powers, reviewing the Constitutional authority of Congress, the courts, and the President and the institutional framework for making national security decisions.  Next, it covers treatment of citizens and non-citizens during states of emergency and war, including humanitarian law. The course reviews the law governing the intelligence services, including the conduct of covert operations and intelligence gathering.  Problems of counter-intelligence and cybersecurity will be considered.  Finally, the course introduces efforts to preserve domestic security, including transportation and medical infrastructure and food, water, and energy security.

LAW 8430 - International Business Transactions

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course covers a variety of issues relating to business transactions between private parties when the parties have their respective places of business in different countries or when the goods, services or technologies that are the subject of the transaction cross at least one national border. The course begins with coverage of background matters generally applicable across a broad spectrum of international business transactions, including ethical considerations for the transnational practice of law; working with local counsel; issues relating to choice of law; the modern system of international trade in which private parties operate; and the nature of international business practice. The course also includes a more particular focus on certain specific kinds of business transactions in the international context, including sales of goods, distribution and agency arrangements, and licensing arrangements. This is not a course in International Trade Law.

LAW 8435 - International Trade Law (PL)

Credit(s): 2-3 Credits

This course is recommended for students interested in a business law practice, especially those who want to learn more about U.S. and international trade law and how it impacts business. The course will focus on U.S. and international trade law, trade policy and the institutions involved. The U.S. focus will include a study of the domestic laws and institutions relating to the conduct of foreign trade relations, formation of trade treaties, customs law, tariffs, and unfair trade practices. The international focus will be on multilateral and regional trade organizations, including the World Trade Organization, NAFTA and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Topics will include institutional structure, national treatment, most favored nation treatment, trade in goods, trade in services, foreign investment, intellectual property, dispute settlement, treatment of developing countries, trade and labor, and trade and the environment.

LAW 8450 - Admiralty

Credit(s): 2-3 Credits

Admiralty examines the law governing maritime casualties and transactions. Although the course will prove helpful to someone considering an Admiralty practice, it is intended for all students. It integrates knowledge gained in other courses in the process of studying problems that arise in a maritime context. Admiralty touches upon many substantive areas of law including constitutional law, federal courts, procedure, torts, contracts, property, choice of law, remedies, environmental law, insurance, legislation, secured transactions, products liability. As such, it serves as a broad review course and affords students an opportunity to sample some subjects they may otherwise miss. Admiralty promotes better understanding of law generally by offering students the opportunity to compare Admiralty to land law while focusing on some of the more interesting questions in law as they arise in an Admiralty context.

LAW 8471 - Int'l Refugee Lw/Glob Migr(PL)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course will examine the laws that pertain to the status of refugees as well as the treaties affecting  not only the  rights and responsibilities of refugees but of the countries that host them as well.  This course will provide the opportunity to explore refugee law both historically and in the context of the continuing refugee crisis in Africa, Asia and beyond.  Students will examine the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, as well as instruments  of international law.  Students will  also discuss United States laws on refugees and asylum seekers in an effort to compare and contrast the bodies of law.  Special attention will also be given to the experience of the refugee.  

LAW 8495 - Comparative Human Rights (PL)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Human rights, in the modern world, are undergoing a parallel process of globalization and judicialisation: - Globalization means the global spread of certain values and concepts which have gained increasing universal acceptance and the convergence of the understanding of human rights around the world; one of these concepts is that access to justice constitutes a necessary prerequisite of fundamental rights. - Judicialisation refers to the growing number of jurisdictions (national, regional and global) deciding human rights cases. It gives rise to the development of different forms of dialogue between courts and judges. The object of this course is to examine this process as seen from the perspective of a judge. The course begins with a comparative presentation of different systems protecting individual rights, as well as of major techniques (like proportionality, subsidiarity and margin of appreciation) used by courts when deciding human rights cases. The second part will examine three selected examples how similar cases have been decided by different European courts, particularly by the European Court of Human Rights and the Court of Justice of the European Union. The cases will deal with: - sexual orientation (in particular, the problem of same-sex partnerships and marriages); - the right to life (in particular, the problem of assisted suicide); and - anti-terrorist measures (in particular, the problem of “black-listing” of alleged terrorism supporters).

LAW 8600 - School of Law Seminars

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Seminars involve a small number of students, usually no more than 12, who engage in extensive research and discussion under a faculty member's supervision. Seminars must include a substantial writing component, for example, a paper of 20 to 25 pages. Ordinarily, the student writing requirement must include: (1) a preliminary draft critiqued by the faculty member and returned prior to the preparation of the final written product; and (2) a final written product. See School of Law website for individual seminar descriptions.

LAW 8620 - Directed Research

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Research and writing on significant developments in the law; analysis and definition of legal problems with emphasis on student initiative; evaluation and use of case, statutory and secondary materials for research; written presentation of the conclusion of research. No more than four hours permitted in a J.D. student's career; no more than 3 hours credit for any one project. Except under extraordinary circumstances, full-time faculty members must supervise. Ordinarily, faculty members can be expected to supervise no more than two directed research projects per semester. Ordinarily, directed research projects must meet the following requirements: (1) a series of meetings between student and directing faculty member; (2) a minimum of 15 pages of writing per credit hour; (3) a preliminary draft critiqued by the faculty member and returned prior to the preparation of the final written product; and (4) a final written product. Students must prepare a proposal for directed research and obtain written permission from the supervising faculty member and the Associate Dean prior to registration. Directed research projects are graded; however, this grade is not included in the student's cumulative grade point average.

LAW 8650 - Law Journal

Credit(s): 1-2 Credits

This course includes research, writing and editing of scholarly and professional materials for publication in the Saint Louis University Law Journal. Supervision of research, writing and editing of other students; management of the Journal. Required of and restricted to members of the Journal staff. In the fall semester, editors and staff receive 1 hour of pass/no pass credit. In the spring semester, editors receive 2 hours of pass/no pass credit, and staff receive 2 hours of letter- graded credit.

LAW 8652 - Public Law Review

Credit(s): 1-2 Credits

Staff members (generally second year students) research, write their own articles, and edit scholarly and professional material for publication in the Public Law Review. Staff receives three credits: 1 p/f credit in the fall semester, and 2 graded credits in the spring semester. Except in exceptional circumstances, students will not receive any credit unless they remain staff members in good standing for the entire academic year. Students are registered by the Editorial Board.

LAW 8654 - Journal of Health Law & Policy

Credit(s): 1-2 Credits

The Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy is published bi-annually by the Center for Health Law Studies and a student editorial board. The Journal features articles that provide in-depth analysis of topical and developing issues in health law and policy. One issue each year is devoted to the publication of the proceedings of the Center for Health Law Studies annual Symposium. The second issue is devoted to coverage of emerging issues within health law and policy. Students and faculty at the Center solicit and review articles submitted for publication. The editorial board also maintains the Journal website which features a health law blog, podcasts of the Center's Distinguished Speaker Series and annual Symposium, and other information about the Journal. <BR><BR> Election to the staff of the Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy is based on an application process and review that is conducted by the editorial board and faculty advisors in the spring semester of each year. To be eligible for the editorial staff, students must have completed two semesters of law school and both semesters of the Legal Research and Writing course. The Journal will hold an orientation meeting each spring to review the application process with students interested in applying. In the fall semester, editors and staff receive 1 hour of pass/no pass credit. In the spring semester, editors receive 2 hours of pass/no pass credit, and staff receive 2 hours of letter- graded credit.

LAW 8656 - ABA Journal of Labor and Employment Law

Credit(s): 1-2 Credits

The ABA Journal of Labor & Employment Law serves as the journal of the Labor and Employment Law Section of the American Bar Association. The purpose of the Journal is to provide a practical forum for balanced discussions of trends and developments in labor and employment law. It serves practicing attorneys, judges, agency officials, academics, arbitrators, and mediators whose work focuses on the role of law in the work lives of Americans. In the fall semester, editors and staff receive 1 hour of pass/no pass credit. In the spring semester, editors receive 2 hours of pass/no pass credit, and staff receive 2 hours of letter- graded credit.

LAW 8680 - Legal Res-Teaching Asst.

Credit(s): 1-2 Credits

Open to second and third year students who are selected as teaching assistants. Responsible for a small group of students under the supervision of the legal Research and Writing Faculty. Application is made at the end of the spring semester of the academic year prior to enrollment in the course. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis and requires attendance in a weekly 1-hour class meeting with Legal Research and Writing faculty, at least 1 hour of availability to Legal Research and Writing students, and guided review and feedback on writing assignments and research. Students are registered by Professor Rollins.

LAW 8685 - Teaching Fellows

Credit(s): 1-2 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

The Teaching Fellow program will utilize outstanding upper level students to work with first year students in a small group setting under the training and supervision of Professors Toni Miceli and Marcia Goldsmith, Co-Directors of Academic Support and Bar Examination Preparation, to provide an experiential component as part of Introduction to Legal Studies. Fellows will take the academic skills topics covered in Introduction to Legal Studies (including case reading and briefing, note taking in class, outlining, exam preparation, exam writing, time management, etc.) and design application exercises to apply within their assigned 1L small group, allowing the 1Ls to develop their academic skills in the context of a particular substantive course. The goal of the Teaching Fellow program is to make our 1L students more self-directed and self-sufficient, so that they are independently successful as 2L and 3L students.

LAW 8690 - Competition Based Advocacy

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This course is for upper division students wish to participate in inter-law school competitions. Students must 1) complete both semesters of Legal Research & Writing, 2) complete at least twenty-four (24) law school credit hours, and 3) satisfy all prerequisites applicable to the course section before registering for this course. Selection of students for each competition varies and students should direct inquiries to faculty advisors. Students receive pass/no pass credit based upon completion of the competition requirements and by the recommendation of the faculty advisor assigned to the competition.

LAW 8700 - Insurance Law

Credit(s): 1 or 2 Credits

This course will cover regulation and types of insurance organizations; principles underlying contracts of insurance, with special attention given to analysis, construction and effects of life, fire, group, personal and property liability insurance policies; insurable interests; subrogation; insured events and exceptions; selection and control of risks; making and cancellation of insurance contracts. Grades for this course are pass/no pass.

LAW 8712 - Child Advocacy and the Law

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course will focus on what it means to be an attorney for a minor, with particular, but not exclusive emphasis on the children in the child welfare system. We will look at the laws surrounding what it means to be a parent, different forms of abuse, the foster care system and its permanency options, medical decision making, educational advocacy, and delinquency. We will rely heavily on Missouri law and legal systems as examples of the various topics covered. There will be opportunities for guest speakers and court observation.

LAW 8715 - Legislation

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course examines the creation and use of statutes, an increasingly dominant source of law in the United States, from theoretical and practical perspectives. Topics addressed include sources of and constraints on statutory lawmaking power, political models of the legislative process, theoretical approaches to statutory interpretation, and techniques used to arrive at the meaning of statutory provisions, including canons of interpretation and legislative history.

LAW 8720 - Education Law

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Education law and policy have taken on increased prominence within our popular discourse. This enhanced attention has increased the need for law students to acquire insight into salient education issues. This course is designed to introduce students to various aspects of education law, principally focused on the K-12 level. A broad range of topics is covered, including school finance, special education, racial segregation, student rights, and teacher rights. Case law, hypothetical scenarios, and actual current events are used to foster vibrant class discussions.

LAW 8730 - Ferguson

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This course will offer an overview and investigation of the legal implications of the events surrounding the shooting of Michael Brown by Darren Wilson in Ferguson – before, during, and after. Major topics to be covered will include: the structure of the municipal court system in Missouri; oversight, regulation and reform of police departments; the justified use of police force; race and the criminal law; racial profiling; the grand jury system; civil rights suits against police departments and police officers; protests and police response; and municipal home rule. This is a pass/no pass course.

LAW 8735 - Regulating Alcoholic Beverages

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Regulating Alcoholic Beverages offers students the opportunity to see how the law interacts with a particular industry through a variety of regulatory systems. In this case, the industry - the production and sale of alcoholic beverages - is one with a particularly rich history of legal oversight and a particularly complex scheme of current regulation. This course will cover the history of alcoholic beverage regulation, from ancient times through Reinheitsgebot and Prohibition all the way to the present. We will also pull apart the current interwoven federal and state regulatory schemes and look specifically at product regulation, advertising restrictions, distributor and sales requirements, taxation and the roles of antitrust, intellectual property, and criminal law with respect to these beverages.

LAW 9000 - Negotiations (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Most lawyers spend a large part of their time negotiating. This course gives students hands-on experience negotiating, as well as a grounding in negotiation theory. Students participate in a variety of negotiation simulations, as well as in analyzing negotiation problems. Students are observed while negotiating and receive feedback. The negotiation simulations cover a wide range of situations, including business contracts, neighborhood disputes, personal services contracts and international disputes. In addition to the class meeting one afternoon each week, those enrolled will be required to meet with other students outside class hours to negotiate or to prepare for negotiations. It is crucial that all students attend all class sessions (except when ill). Class is limited to twelve students.

LAW 9005 - Transactional Drafting (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Transactional Drafting is for students who wish to develop their transactional drafting skills. It will introduce students to concepts and practical skills necessary for an effective transactional law practice. This course will help students to both understand the basic components of an effective written agreement and draft precise, plain English documents. The focus of this course is on a variety of concepts and skills, including (i) using effective written communication; (ii) understanding and strategically revising common boilerplate contract provisions; (iii) using defined terms appropriately and effectively; (iv) understanding the basic types of written documents transactional attorneys use to help their clients conduct business; and (v) drafting, revising, and reviewing documents. Through both in-class and out-of-class work, students will understand and practice drafting components of a variety of agreements attorneys are likely to encounter during their first few years of practice (such as, for example, nondisclosure agreements, owner agreements, worker agreements, assignments, leases, and license agreements)

LAW 9010 - Advanced Legal Research (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course provides advanced instruction on how to develop a research plan, and how to make economic decisions about using electronic or print resources or a suitable combination of both. Weekly print and on-line assignments provide concentrated practice using print and electronic federal and state statutory, judicial, and regulatory materials; and in finding reliable Internet and subscription sites for legal research. Students will gain experience in in-depth analysis of electronic search results; and learn the organization and use of both print and on-line topical current awareness services. The grade will be based on weekly assignments, class attendance, one comprehensive in-class exam, and one individual research project. Students may anticipate spending approximately 2 hours a week on the weekly assignments.

LAW 9012 - State Legal Research (E)

Credit(s): 1 or 2 Credits

This course will provide an in-depth and hands-on review of legal research materials, techniques and tools specific to the practice of law in Missouri and Illinois. The course will explore primary and secondary sources related to the states' legislative, executive and judicial systems. It will cover research materials in all formats including treatises, practice materials, forms, government websites and commercial electronic databases used to find legislative and regulatory histories, agency decisions, and case law. Strategies for ensuring efficient and comprehensive research in Missouri and Illinois law - including methods of keeping up to date with changes, developments and news - will also be covered.

LAW 9020 - Civil Practice Large Group (E)

Credit(s): 0 Credits

Civil Practice focuses on practical, theoretical, and ethical issues in pretrial civil litigation practice through lecture and discussion and emphasizes the development of practice skills through simulation exercises in client interviewing, fact investigation, pleading, formal discovery (depositions, interrogatories, etc.), pretrial motion practice, negotiation, and jury instructions. Simulation exercises are conducted in small groups under the supervision of adjunct faculty. Civil Practice meets for 1 hour in a large group (pass/no pass), and 2 hours each week in a small group (letter grade).

LAW 9021 - Civil Practice Sm Grp X (E)

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Civil Practice focuses on practical, theoretical, and ethical issues in pre trial civil litigation practice through lecture and discussion and emphasizes the development of practice skills through simulation exercises in client interviewing, fact investigation, pleading, formal discovery (depositions, interrogatories, etc.), pretrial motion practice, negotiation, and jury instructions. Simulation exercises are conducted in small groups under the supervision of adjunct faculty. Civil Practice meets for 1 hour in a large group (pass/no pass), and 2 hours each week in a small group (letter grade).

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7000 and LAW 7001

LAW 9030 - Evidence and Advocacy Large Group

Credit(s): 4 Credits

Evidence and Advocacy will explore the interplay between the rules of evidence and advocacy/persuasion in the courtroom.  This “tethered” approach to Evidence and TrialAdvocacy will allow the Apprentice Lawyer (AL) to experience, in a trial setting, the rules of evidence as they are mastered and utilized in the context of courtroom persuasion.  The course will be taught in a Team Based Learning environment, with Trial Teams taking responsibility for leading the discussions on the Federal Rules of Evidence and developing trial advocacy scenarios to emphasize the rules under discussion.  The expectations for ALs in this course will be the same as those imposed on associates in a law firm setting, including the requirement of business casual attire.  Each portion of the course is evaluated and graded separately.  

LAW 9031 - Evid & Adv: Tr Adv Sm Gr X (E)

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Evidence and Advocacy will explore the interplay between the rules of evidence and advocacy/persuasion in the courtroom.  This “tethered” approach to Evidence and TrialAdvocacy will allow the Apprentice Lawyer (AL) to experience, in a trial setting, the rules of evidence as they are mastered and utilized in the context of courtroom persuasion.  The course will be taught in a Team Based Learning environment, with Trial Teams taking responsibility for leading the discussions on the Federal Rules of Evidence and developing trial advocacy scenarios to emphasize the rules under discussion.  The expectations for ALs in this course will be the same as those imposed on associates in a law firm setting, including the requirement of business casual attire.  Each portion of the course is evaluated and graded separately.  

LAW 9041 - Trial Advocacy I Small Group X (E)

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will cover the presentation of simulated jury trial from jury selection to final judgment.  The work in the course is divided into three parts; a two-hour small group meeting; independent review, analysis and summaries of On-line Advocacy Lectures and the complete final trial of a simulated case. In the small group meetings, students perform exercises in trial skills outlined in the On-line Advocacy Lectures and in the course text book. The final trials are held in the Civil Courts Building across from the law school before juries of first year SLU Law students. Like practicing lawyers, students in this course will be responsible for taking ownership of much of their development as a competent courtroom advocates by their review and analysis of text book and on-line materials.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7105*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

LAW 9042 - Trial Advocacy II (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Focus is on preparation for a criminal or civil trial, and course will build on the knowledge and skills acquired in Trial Advocacy I. Course enrollment is limited to 12 students.

Prerequisite(s): (LAW 9041 or LAW 9031)

LAW 9050 - Moot Court I (E)

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

Appellate Advocacy – Moot Court I is the study of relationships and communications between the appellate judiciary and the attorneys practicing before appellate courts. In the fall semester, students will primarily focus on learning the process and art of appellate brief writing.  There will be 2 hours of class meetings each week for the first 10 weeks of the semester.  Students will research a problem, prepare and submit drafts of various portions of the brief which will be reviewed by the professor, as well as prepare and submit a final brief.  In addition, students will engage in oral argument exercises critiqued by the professor prior to final oral arguments before members of the local legal community.  Enrollment is limited to 20 students maximum per section.

LAW 9051 - Moot Court II (E)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

As a result of the first semester competition, a group of at least eight teams will be chosen to participate in the second semester advanced competition. In addition, the winners of the second semester competition are sponsored by the School of Law at a national or regional competition in the fall semester of the following year. Students are registered by Professor.

LAW 9052 - Moot Court Board

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Students who have completed Moot Court I and II with a grade of B or better are eligible to apply for positions as Teaching Assistants for the following semester. Each Teaching Assistant is responsible for a small group of students (8-10) under the supervision of the Moot Court Faculty. Teaching Assistants are required to attend a weekly 1-hour class meeting with the Moot Court Faculty, maintain at least 1 hour of availability to students enrolled in the Moot Court program, draft class assignments for the semester, draft bench memos, provide written feedback on the student?s drafts, provide feedback on practice oral arguments, and be available to assist in logistics of final oral arguments. Application is made at the end of the spring semester of the academic year prior to enrollment in the course. Students receive 1 credit per semester, graded but not factored into the G.P.A. Students are registered by Professor Rollins.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 9050 and LAW 9051

LAW 9060 - Law Practice Management (E)

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course covers principles relating to management of the law firm, management of the legal work, and management of the individual as a professional person.

LAW 9065 - Leadership and Education Based Advocacy

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This course will aid in the professional development of SLU LAW students while assisting St. Louis high youth in developing their skills with trial advocacy, self advocacy and college preparation. It will have a classroom workshop and training component, and an experiential learning component. During the law class students will interact with legal and teaching professionals to develop the best ways to create a productive learning environment for their students. They will also reflect on their own performance, share best practices with program participants, conduct peer reviews and critically evaluate the program and program material. Classes are scheduled for 50 minutes on Tuesdays at 5 p.m. but will not meet every week. In addition to the classroom component, law students will spend a certain number of hours each week at their designated project site. Availability on one or two Saturdays during the semester may be required. In addition to Youth and Government as a project, this mini-course course has added Street Law Youth Programming as an available project. For Youth and Government, students will work in teams of two and be assigned to a specific high school or YMCA Urban Core Branch. For the Street Law projects, students will be participating in one of the youth community engagement programs: teaching Street Law to high school students, teaching Street law to youth in the Juvenile Detention Center, facilitating a college preparatory/mentoring program, or coaching mock trial for middle school students. Law students will spend one hour each week (or an equivalent) at their assigned community site with their students. They will use their analytical and communication skills to teach the youth important skills in preparation for specific objectives. (Law students may be required to accompany their students to the statewide competition in Jefferson City in November/December.) This course is graded on a pass/no pass basis.

LAW 9070 - Client Counseling (E)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

The objective of this course is development of client interviewing and counseling skills through simulation exercises.

LAW 9075 - Jury Instructions and the Trial Process (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

Theoretical and practical aspects of jury instructions (including special interrogatories) at trial are presented from the perspective of the judge, counsel, the jury, and the court of appeals. The course will involve the students in researching and drafting instructions, using pattern instructions, participating in a simulated jury instruction conference, and writing an appellate court opinion. The course may include presentations by practicing trial attorneys and the observation of a jury instruction conference in an actual trial.

LAW 9500 - Civil Advocacy (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course is the companion course for Civil Advocacy Clinic I, and students enrolled in this course must enroll concurrently in Civil Advocacy Clinic I. This course focuses on self-reflection, learning from practice, and lawyering skills related to Missouri and Illinois civil practice. Students receive a letter grade based on written assignments, in-class exercises and discussions, and other forms of assessment. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 9501

Corequisite(s): LAW 9501

LAW 9501 - Civil Advocacy Clinic I (E)

Credit(s): 3 or 4 Credits

In this course, students assume primary responsibility for civil client matters under the tailored supervision of a faculty member. This course is open to students who (i) are eligible to receive a Missouri or Illinois student practice license, (ii) have completed Legal Profession (or who will concurrently enroll in Legal Profession with the permission of the faculty member teaching the course), and (iii) enroll concurrently in the companion course, Civil Advocacy. Students may also be required to complete additional prerequisite courses or satisfy other requirements. Students may enroll in this course for 3 or 4 credits. For each credit hour, a student must complete 45 hours of clinic work. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7100, LAW 7000, and LAW 7001

Corequisite(s): LAW 9500

LAW 9502 - Civil Advocacy Clinic II (E)

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course is open to students who have completed Civil Advocacy Clinic I, as space permits. Students continue their work on client matters under the tailored supervision of a faculty member. In addition, students meet with a faculty member for classroom instruction related to their experience. Students may enroll in this course for 2 or 3 credits. For each credit hour, students must complete 45 hours of combined time of clinic and classroom work. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 9501 and LAW 9500

Restrictions:

Students with a semester level of First Year Law or First Year Law PT Evening may not enroll.

LAW 9510 - Criminal Defense Advocacy (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course is the companion course for Criminal Defense Clinic, and students enrolled in this course must enroll concurrently in Criminal Defense Clinic. This course focuses on self-reflection, learning from practice, and lawyering skills related to the theoretical and practical issues in a Missouri criminal defense practice such as client interviewing, bail and pre-trial release, investigations, motion practice, discovery, preliminary examinations, plea-bargaining, post-verdict proceedings, and sentencing. Students receive a letter grade based on written assignments, in-class exercises and discussions, and other forms of assessment. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Prerequisite(s): (LAW 7100, LAW 7300, and LAW 7005); (LAW 9031 or LAW 7105)

Corequisite(s): LAW 9511

LAW 9511 - Criminal Defense Clinic I (E)

Credit(s): 3 or 4 Credits

In this course, students assume primary responsibility for criminal client matters under the tailored supervision of a faculty member. This course is open to students who (i) are eligible to receive a Missouri or Illinois student practice license, (ii) have completed Legal Profession (or who will concurrently enroll in Legal Profession with the permission of the faculty member teaching the course), and (iii) enroll concurrently in the companion course, Criminal Defense Advocacy. Students may also be required to complete additional prerequisite courses or satisfy other requirements. Students may enroll in this course for 3 or 4 credits. For each credit hour, a student must complete 45 hours of clinic work. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Corequisite(s): LAW 9510

LAW 9512 - Criminal Defense Clinic II

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This clinic is open to students who have completed Criminal Defense Clinic I, as space permits. Students continue their work in the Saint Louis University School of Law Clinic under the supervision of a Clinic Faculty member. For each clinic credit hour, a student must work 3 hours each week. Grades in this course are recorded on the student’s transcript as pass/no pass. Students register through the Clinic.  

LAW 9520 - Applied Mediation Skills (PS)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Students enrolled in this course must enroll concurrently in the Applied Mediation Clinic. The course addresses common issues faced in mediation settings. The focus will be on negotiation techniques and skills. Mediation in the context of family law cases and landlord-tenant law will be stressed. Students receive a letter grade in this course based on performance on a series of written assignments, exercises and short essay tests.

Corequisite(s): LAW 9521

LAW 9521 - Applied Mediation Clinic

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This clinic is open to students who have completed at least 46 credits or one-half of their legal education. Students enrolled in this clinic must enroll concurrently in the Applied Mediation Skills course. Students attend a 40 hour mediation training program, work 9 hours a week observing ADR processes conducted by court-appointed neutrals, and conducting landlord tenant mediations in housing court and conciliation mediations in family court. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass.

Corequisite(s): LAW 9520

LAW 9530 - Entrepreneurship and Community Development (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course is the companion course for Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic I, and students enrolled in this course must enroll concurrently in Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic I. This course focuses on self-reflection, learning from practice, and lawyering skills related to representing entrepreneurs, community groups, nonprofits, social enterprises, and small businesses. Students receive a letter grade based on written assignments, in-class exercises and discussions, and other forms of assessment. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7100*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

LAW 9531 - Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic I (E)

Credit(s): 3 or 4 Credits

In this course, students assume primary responsibility for entrepreneurship and community development client matters under the tailored supervision of a faculty member. This course is open to students who (i) are eligible to receive a Missouri or Illinois student practice license, (ii) have completed Legal Profession (or who will concurrently enroll in Legal Profession with the permission of the faculty member teaching the course), and (iii) enroll concurrently in the companion course, Entrepreneurship and Community Development Practice. Students may also be required to complete additional prerequisite courses or satisfy other requirements. Students may enroll in this course for 3 or 4 credits. For each credit hour, a student must complete 45 hours of clinic work. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7100*

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

LAW 9532 - Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic II (E)

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course is open to students who have completed Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic I, as space permits. Students continue their work on client matters under the tailored supervision of a faculty member. In addition, students meet with a faculty member for classroom instruction related to their experience. Students may enroll in this course for 2 or 3 credits. For each credit hour, students must complete 45 hours of combined time of clinic and classroom work. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 9530* and LAW 9531

* Concurrent enrollment allowed.

LAW 9540 - Business Law Innov Practice(E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course is the companion course for Business Law and Innovation Clinic I, and students enrolled in this course must enroll concurrently in Business Law and Innovation Clinic I. This course focuses on self-reflection, learning from practice, and lawyering skills related to representing innovators, entrepreneurs, and tech, social and small business enterprises. The focus is on innovation and entrepreneurial initiatives in the region, transactional techniques and skills, protecting intellectual property rights, structuring business entities, and drafting governance documentation. Students receive a letter grade based on written assignments, in-class exercises and discussions, and other forms of assessment. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

LAW 9541 - Business Lw Innov Clinic I (E)

Credit(s): 3 or 4 Credits

In this course, students assume primary responsibility for business client matters under the supervision of a faculty member. This course is open to students who (i) are eligible to receive a Missouri or Illinois student practice license, (ii) have completed Legal Profession (or who will concurrently enroll in Legal Profession with the permission of the faculty member teaching the course), and (iii) enroll concurrently in the companion course, Business Law and Innovation Practice. Students may also be required to complete additional prerequisite courses or satisfy other requirements. Students may enroll in this course for 3 or 4 credits. For each credit hour, a student must complete 45 hours of clinic work. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

LAW 9542 - Business Lw Innov Clinic II(E)

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course is open to students who have completed Business Law and Innovation Clinic I, as space permits. Students continue their work on client matters under the supervision of a faculty member. In addition, students meet with a faculty member for classroom instruction related to their experience. Students may enroll in this course for 2 or 3 credits. For each credit hour, students must complete 45 hours of combined time of clinic and classroom work. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

LAW 9600 - Lawyering Practice (E)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This course is the companion course for Field Placement I, and students enrolled in this course must enroll concurrently in Field Placement I. This course focuses on self-reflection, learning from practice, and lawyering skills. Students receive a letter grade based on written assignments, in-class exercises and discussions, and presentations. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7100

Corequisite(s): LAW 9601

LAW 9601 - Field Placement I (E)

Credit(s): 3-8 Credits

This course immerses students in a criminal, corporate or public interest practice setting under the dual supervision of a faculty member and a site supervisor. It is open to students who (i) are eligible to receive a Missouri or Illinois student practice license, (ii) have completed Legal Profession (or who will concurrently enroll in Legal Profession with the permission of the faculty member teaching the course), and (iii) enroll concurrently in the companion course, Lawyering Practice. Depending on the placement, students may also be required to complete additional prerequisite courses and satisfy other placement-specific requirements. Depending on placement requirements and student preference, students enroll in this course for 3, 4, 6 or 8 credits. For each credit hour, a student must complete 50 hours at the placement site. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7100, LAW 7000, and LAW 7001

Corequisite(s): LAW 9600

LAW 9602 - Field Placement II (E)

Credit(s): 2 or 3 Credits

This course is open to students who have completed Field Placement I, as placement space permits. It immerses students in a criminal, corporate, or public interest practice setting under the dual supervision of a faculty member and a site supervisor. Depending on the placement, students may also be required to complete additional prerequisite courses and satisfy other placement-specific requirements. As part of this course, students must also engage in ongoing, contemporaneous, faculty-guided reflection. Depending on placement requirements and student preference, students enroll in this course for 2 or 3 credits. For each credit hour, students must complete 50 hours of combined time at the placement site and engaging in the required faculty-guided reflection. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

LAW 9610 - Judicial Process and Procedure (E)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

This course is the companion course for Judicial Process Field Placement, and students enrolled in this course must enroll concurrently in Judicial Process Field Placement. This course focuses on self-reflection, learning from experience, judicial process and clerkship skills. Students receive a letter grade based on written assignments, in-class exercises and discussions, and presentations. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

LAW 9611 - Judicial Process Field Placement (E)

Credit(s): 3 or 4 Credits

This course immerses students in a judicial setting under the dual supervision of a faculty member and a site supervisor. It is open to students who (i) have completed the equivalent of one full-time year of their legal education, (ii) have completed Legal Profession (or who will concurrently enroll in Legal Profession with the permission of the faculty member teaching the course), and (iii) enroll concurrently in the companion course, Judicial Process and Procedure. Depending on the placement, students may also be required to complete additional prerequisite courses or satisfy other placement-specific requirements. Depending on placement requirements and student preference, students enroll in this course for 3 or 4 credits. For each credit hour, a student must complete 50 hours at the placement site. Grades in this course are recorded on the student's transcript as pass/no pass. Students apply and register through the clinic and field placement application and registration process that occurs prior to the start of general registration each semester.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7000 and LAW 7001

Corequisite(s): LAW 9610

LAW 9620 - Health Law Agency Practice (E)

Credit(s): 2 Credits

This course is designed to be the didactic component of the “Health Law Semester in Washington DC” program. Each student enrolled in the program will earn externship credit for working on health law matters in a federal agency under a supervising attorney. Every student participating in that program must simultaneously enroll in this course. The course provides substantive instruction in health law agency practice as well as an opportunity for students to reflect on their work experiences. The substantive instruction includes selected lessons on administrative law as applied in the health care setting and selected lessons on professional ethics in the context of agency practice. The reflective portion of the course will occur through guided in-class discussion and through student writing assignments and in-class presentations. The course will be taught in Washington DC by an adjunct professor who practices there.

LAW 9621 - Health Law Externship DC

Credit(s): 10-12 Credits

The Health Law Semester in D.C. is a competitive application externship program. In Washington D.C. law students clerk in a health-related federal agency full time for an entire spring semester gaining significant practical experience working with health care regulations. Students who successfully complete the semester earn 12 externship credits, which are graded on a pass-fail basis.Possible placements include: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Quality and Safety; U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of General Counsel; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Counsel to the Inspector General; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of General Counsel, Public Health Division; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of General Counsel; U.S. Department of Justice, Antitrust Division; or Federal Trade Commission, Bureau of Competition, Health Care Division.

LAW 9640 - Corporate Counsel Practice (E)

Credit(s): 1 Credit

Students enrolled in this course must enroll concurrently in the Corporate Counsel Practicum. This course addresses common practice issues and legal skills arising in the in-house practice of law in the corporate context, including practical and strategic considerations as well as ethical dilemmas. Students receive a letter grade based on classroom participation, and performance on written assignments and presentations. Students register through Prof. Weinberger.  This course is co-taught by Profs. Rutledge and Weinberger, and will include visits by supervising attorneys in the Corporate Counsel Practicum.

Prerequisite(s): LAW 7100 and LAW 7110

LAW 9641 - Corporate Counsel Practicum

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This practicum is open to students who have completed Business Associations and Legal Profession.  Students enrolled in this practicum must enroll concurrently in the Corporate Counsel Practice course. Students are placed in corporate legal departments of major St. Louis based corporations under the supervision of in-house corporate counsel, and the direction of a full-time faculty member. For each externship credit hour, a student must work 3 hours each week.  Past or planned corporate placements include Charter Communications, Schnucks, Sigma-Aldrich, Emerson, Kellwood, Ameren UE, Monsanto, and Trans States Airlines.  Grades in this course are recorded on the student’s transcript as pass/no pass.   Students apply by sending Professor Weinberger a cover letter and resume.  Enrollment is limited to 25 students.  Students will be registered by Professor Weinberger.