History (HIST)

HIST 1110 - Origins of the Modern World to 1500

Credit(s): 0 or 3 Credits

An historical approach to understanding the development of the modern world to 1500. The course will examine ancient civilizations, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, Christianity, Islam, Byzantium, the Middle Ages, The Renaissance, and encounters between cultures and regions of the globe.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, History Requirement (A&S)

HIST 1115 - Origins of the Modern World to 1500

Credit(s): 3 Credits

An historical approach to understanding the development of the modern world to 1500. The course will examine ancient civilizations, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, Christianity, Islam, Byzantium, the Middle Ages, The Renaissance, and encounters between cultures and regions of the globe.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 2005

Attributes: Prof. Studies Students Only

HIST 1120 - Origins of the Modern World, 1500 to Present

Credit(s): 0 or 3 Credits

An historical approach to understanding the development of the modern world from 1500 to the present. The course will examine the cross-cultural impact of European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Scientific Revolution, absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French and Industrial Revolutions, nineteenth and twentieth century thought the World Wars, totalitarian and liberation movements, and the challenges of the new global age.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, History Requirement (A&S)

HIST 1125 - Origins of the Modern World, 1500 to Present

Credit(s): 3 Credits

An historical approach to understanding the development of the modern world from 1500 to the present. The course will examine the cross-cultural impact of European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Scientific Revolution, absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French and Industrial Revolutions, nineteenth and twentieth century thought the World Wars, totalitarian and liberation movements, and the challenges of the new global age.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 2005

Attributes: Prof. Studies Students Only

HIST 1930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 1980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 2600 - History of the United States to 1865

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course covers American history from the period of contact through the Civil War. Topics include the collision of European, African, and Native American cultures in the age of contact and settlement; colonial British North America; the American Revolution and the Constitution; geographic expansion and social, economic, and cultural change in the Jacksonian era; slavery and the sectional conflict, and the Civil War.

HIST 2610 - History of the United States Since 1865

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will survey the major historical developments in American history as the United States emerged as a major world power. The course will examine such issues as the shift from a rural agrarian to an urban industrial nation, the changing view of the role of government in society and the economy, and the evolution of foreign policy from nineteenth century isolation to world super power in the years after World War II.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 2615 - History of the United States Since 1865

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This survey course examines the U.S. from Reconstruction through the present. Required for majors.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 2005

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the Schl for Professional Studies college.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History, Prof. Studies Students Only

HIST 2700 - China and Japan To 1600

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the histories and cultures of China and Japan from the origins to the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) and the establishment of the Tokugawa shogunate (1603-1868). Students will be guided in analyzing pieces of archaeological, historical, literary, and artistic evidence and in developing a comparative perspective with the West. Funerary and ritual practices, warfare, state formation, ideology, and the influence of Confucianism, Daoism, Shintoism, and Buddhism on institutions and society will be among the main themes treated in class.

Attributes: International Studies-Asia

HIST 2710 - China and Japan since 1600

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Follows the political, cultural, and social histories of China and Japan from the seventeenth century to the present. The course concentrates on the interaction of China and Japan as well as on their respective roles in international exchanges and conflicts. The class will focus on the impact of traditions such as Confucianism, Buddhism, Shintoism, and Christianity on society and institutions, on organized violence (e.g. warfare, uprisings, and samurai ideology) and on gender relations. Students will learn how to approach historical, literary, and artistic evidence and develop a critical perspective on cross-cultural issues.

Attributes: Foreign Service Elective, International Studies, International Studies-Asia

HIST 2730 - Crossroads of the World: The Middle East and North Africa Through History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Introductory survey of Middle Eastern history from pre-Islamic late antiquity to the present. Students learn to identify and explain the region’s political geography, peoples, languages, cultures, major historical periods and events, and causes of change. No prerequisites. Prepares students for advanced courses in Middle Eastern history.

HIST 2800 - Historian's Craft: Methods Proseminar

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Historian's Craft provides research and writing training to prepare students for successful careers as History majors and minors and a vocation after college. The Historian's Craft Proseminar is required for majors and minors in the revised major and minor program.

Prerequisite(s): (HIST 1110 and HIST 1120)

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a program in History.

HIST 2930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 2980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 3000 - Ancient Greece

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Covers ancient Greek history from the Mycenaean through the Hellenistic period (roughly from 1600 BC to 30 BC). Besides Sarah Pomeroy et al., Ancient Greece (2nd edition), readings will include Homer's Odyssey and works by Sappho, Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plato, and Plutarch.

Attributes: Classical Humanities, Pre-1600 European History

HIST 3010 - Roman Republic

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The history of Rome from its origins to the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C. An examination of Roman myth associated with the city's foundation, the Roman monarchy, the founding of the Republic, the conquest of the Mediterranean and the establishment of the provincial system, the gradual loss of senatorial effectiveness, and the eventual dominance of Caesar's Dictatorship.

Attributes: Pre-1600 European History

HIST 3020 - The Roman Empire

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Surveys the ancient empire from the late first century B.C. to the fifth century A.D. Our goal is two-fold: to explore the key figures and political and military developments that shaped Rome and to balance that top-down approach by digging up evidence for daily life, including the role of women in Roman society, the importance of slavery to the economy and the centrality of religion. The goal is to appreciate the diversity of the Roman experience'including who participated in Roman rule, who didn't, and how Romans themselves wrestled with their changing identity, over five centuries of ancient Mediterranean history.

HIST 3030 - The Byzantine Empire

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Surveys the history and civilization of the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire from its separation from the Western Roman Empire in AD 285 to the fall of the last Byzantine successor state, the Empire of Trebizond, in 1461. The long-lasting Byzantine Empire was a strange mixture of the vigorous and the decadent, the religious and the pragmatic, and the exotic and the familiar. We will also discuss several of the great works of Byzantine literature, including St. Athanasius' supernatural Life of St. Anthony, Procopius' scandalous Secret History, the heroic epic Digenes Acrites, and Michael Psellus' brilliant Fourteen Byzantine Rulers.

Attributes: Classical Humanities, Catholic Studies-History, Pre-1600 European History, Medieval (Major) - History

HIST 3040 - The Middle Ages to 1100

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course surveys the history of the West from late antiquity to the great changes occurring after the turn of the millennium (up to 1100). These centuries witnessed dramatic transformations and creative impulses as cultures mixed and the three great civilizations of Europe, Byzantium, and Islam arose. The foundations were being laid for the Western world we know today. If the sources preserved from this period are fewer than before or after, it only makes the historical detective work more challenging and exciting.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, Pre-1600 European History, Medieval (Minor) - History

HIST 3050 - The Middle Ages 1100 to 1450

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Western Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages was a time of great change and diversity. Many of the laws and the states which govern us owe their origins to this period, as do the universities in which we study. It was the age of the crusades and Saint Francis of Assisi, of the Inquisition, of our own Saint Louis, the Black Death, the Renaissance and voyages to the New World. We will examine the vital themes of medieval history, asking how the people who lived then were different from us and in what senses they are the same.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, Pre-1600 European History, Italian Culture

HIST 3060 - The Crusades

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The Crusades were one of the defining features of the Middle Ages. They affected a number of aspects of the medieval world including commerce, canon law, warfare, religious devotion, bureaucracy, Orthodox-Catholic relations, and Christian-Muslim interaction. In a post-9/11 world the Crusades have received renewed attention for the possible ways that these conflicts may have influenced our current geo-political climate. This course will examine the origins, ideas, events, and impact of the crusading movement as well as the Islamic response to the Crusades and the perception of the Crusades in modern times.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, Pre-1600 European History, Medieval (Major) - History

HIST 3070 - Catholic Traditions to 1540

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Theology, spirituality, church organization, religious art from the time of the Apostles to the Counter Reformation. Readings from classics.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, Pre-1600 European History

HIST 3080 - Catholic Tradition Since 1540

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Theology, spirituality, church organization, religious art from the Council of Trent to the Second Vatican Council and its effects.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, Modern European History

HIST 3090 - The Age of Renaissance

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Once seen as the age of artistic glory, the ""discovery"" of new worlds, rampant individualism, and nostalgia for the classical past, the existence of a European Renaissance is now in question. Did it exclude women? Did its ambitions for economic expansion lead to the near extinction of the peoples of the New World? How did the emphasis on reason comfortably coexist with astrology, alchemy, and the ""occult"" sciences? Did its political ideas nurture seeds of democracy or did they legitimize unrestrained exercise of power? Did the attitudes of Europeans towards Africans and others contribute to the development of modern racism?.

Attributes: Modern European History, Italian Culture

HIST 3100 - The Reformation Era

Credit(s): 3 Credits

When Martin Luther went public with his 95 Theses in 1517, he had no idea that his protest against indulgences would turn the Church, the European political landscape and ultimately much of the Western world upside down. Luther's efforts at reform inspired five subsequent waves of reform ' the Swiss, Radical, Calvinist, English and Catholic Reformations. Complicating fraught relations between Christians, Jews and Muslims, they helped lead to the bloodshed of the Peasants' War, the Schmalkaldic Wars, the Thirty Years War and the English Civil Wars. This course will peer into the Pandora's box inadvertently opened by Luther's 95 Theses.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, Modern European History

HIST 3110 - The Age of Absolutism

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will provide a broad survey of the most important events, individuals, and ideas in European history in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We will focus on the theory and practice of royal absolutism, including its religious, political, and cultural components, as well as the challenges to these ideas. We will investigate changes in religion, science, and philosophy. We will examine why, as hierarchy and received wisdom came under attack, other social roles, especially those related to reproduction and biological difference, found social emphasis. We will conclude with a discussion of the crises that led to the French Revolution.

Attributes: Modern European History

HIST 3120 - French Revolution and Napolean, 1789-1815

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The French Revolution and Napoleon era was decisive in shaping the modern West. It destroyed medieval structures, implemented the ideals of the Enlightenment, promoted the interests of the middle classes, quickened the growth of the modern state, and gave birth to nationalism. More than 200 years after the revolution began, the debate over its meaning continues. Was it a product of the growing discontent of a revolutionary middle-class? Did women have more rights before the revolution offered equality to all men? Was the Terror an outgrowth of revolutionary politics? Was Napoleon a revolutionary or an enlightened despot who betrayed it?.

Attributes: Modern European History

HIST 3130 - The Age of Industrialism and Democracy, 1815-1914

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course begins with the multi-faceted impact of the French Revolution'and its unfulfilled promise of emancipation'and ends with the rising tensions within and between European nations in the decade or so after 1900. We will look at two forces that decisively shaped the century: the democratic challenge to existing political institutions and the rise of mass politics; and the industrial revolution, which provided the underpinnings of Europe's societal transformations as well as of the global reach of its power. Great emphasis will however also be placed on culture and on developments in the realm of ideas.

Attributes: Modern European History

HIST 3140 - Twentieth Century Europe: Era of World Wars, 1914-1945

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Under what circumstances do liberal democracies self-destruct and does authoritarianism inevitably lead to war? The years between 1914 and 1945, a miasma of societal polarization, ideological fervor, parliamentary gridlock and violence on the streets, provide answers. Under these circumstances, nation after nation turned to outsiders with bearing extremist agendas and promising the restoration of lost national grandeur. Who bore responsibility for the decisions to enter into both World Wars? Who bore responsibility for the collapse of liberal regimes? Were some nations more culpable than others?.

Attributes: Foreign Service Elective, Modern European History, International Studies

HIST 3150 - Europe since 1945

Credit(s): 3 Credits

After 1945, Europe entered into an unprecedented era of political and economic stability. How do we account for this? Were political parties such as the Christian Democratic parties in Western Europe or the new European Union responsible? Or was it darker realities - the polarizing effects of the Cold War, repression in Eastern Europe, widespread ethnic cleansing in the immediate postwar years, decolonization, and whitewashing tainted pasts from the wartime years? The second half of the course examines challenges to the postwar European order - destalinization, student protests, economic stagnation, neo-conservatism, radical Islam, populism and renewed authoritarianism.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, Italian Culture

HIST 3160 - Eastern Europe

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Survey of the lands and peoples between Germany and Russia, from the Baltic to the Black Seas from the fall of Rome in the West until the present. Emphasizes those religious, cultural, political, and economic elements which have shaped Eastern Europe, including the impact of the Byzantine, Ottoman, German, Habsburg, and Russian Empires. Special attention is paid to the role of Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia and to the changes in the region since the fall of Communism.

Attributes: Modern European History, International Studies-Europe

HIST 3170 - Colonial Latin America

Credit(s): 3 Credits

A survey of the histories of Spanish and Portuguese America from 1492 to 1826. Topics addressed will include the political, social, economic, religious, military and intellectual developments that occurred in the three centuries under consideration. An introduction to the Pre-Colombian civilizations (Aztec, Inca and Mayan) will be included. The course ends with a summary that looks forward to contemporary Latin America and stresses the influence of the colonial period on these areas today.

Attributes: Non-Western History

HIST 3180 - Modern Latin America

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Modern Latin American History will examine both the shared and differing experiences of the Spanish and Portuguese speaking nations of Central and South America as well as the Caribbean during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will examine the social, cultural, economic, political, and military history of Latin America while adopting local, national, international, and comparative perspectives. Special attention will be paid to issues of race, gender, and class. By the end of term you should have a deep understanding of the historical forces that have shaped modern Latin America.

Attributes: Foreign Service Elective, Non-Western History, Urban Poverty - Immigration

HIST 3190 - Mexico

Credit(s): 3-4 Credits

This course examines over 300 years of Mesoamerican (Mexico) history, from its pre Columbian birth through its Spanish colonial heritage, focusing on the history, society, culture and economics of this vast nation to our south, and may even include discussion of current matters that have their roots in Mexico's colonial past. Interesting, informative and dynamic - the class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, and will include quizzes, exams and a final research presentation. Readings will include both primary and secondary materials, from where the research topics can be garnered.

Attributes: Non-Western History

HIST 3200 - China to 1644

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the development of China since the ancient Shang dynasty up until the collapse of Ming China. We will study the rise of China as a geographic and cultural entity, the influence of the great philosophical traditions, the arrival of Buddhism, the unification under Qing Shihuang, the divisions during the Three Kingdoms, the attainments of the Tang Dynasty, the Mongolian invasions, and the height of Chinese development under the Sung and Ming dynasties. In each period the course will look at a variety of political, economic, and social topics.

Attributes: Non-Western History

HIST 3210 - China Since 1644

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores some of the main themes in Chinese history from the Manchu conquest in 1644 to the present. Topics include the consolidation under the Manchus in the 1600s; the end of the old imperial order in 1911; relations with the outside world; the development of capitalism, nationalism, and communism; the communist revolution of 1949; the tumultuous changes in the People's Republic since 1949, the Tiananmen Square Massacre, and the rise of China as a global power.

Attributes: Non-Western History

HIST 3220 - The Jesuits in Asia

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course focuses on the Jesuit mission to Asia, with particular focus on China and India, from the late sixteenth century to the Rites Controversy that ended in 1742. The course explores the challenges of cross-cultural interaction in translating the precepts of Catholic Christianity in China and India, and studies the Jesuits as cultural brokers between East and West.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, Non-Western History

HIST 3230 - Africa to 1884

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores the history of Africa to 1884. It delves into the major events that have shaped the evolution and development of African societies in the pre-colonial period. The inventory of themes include early cultures and civilizations, internal dynamics of political and socio-economic change, contacts with European and Asian societies, slave trade and African Diasporas, and prelude to colonization.

Attributes: Global Citizenship (A&S), Non-Western History

HIST 3240 - Africa since 1884

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores the modern history of Africa since 1884. It focuses on the political, economic, and socio-cultural developments that have defined and characterized African societies since the late nineteenth century. Inventory of themes include: Africa in the age of New Imperialism, colonialism and its effects as well as misrepresentations, Africa and its Diaspora, trends and patterns in African nationalisms, Decolonization, and postcolonial challenges including, but not limited to, state and conflict, health and society, and economic development.

Attributes: Global Citizenship (A&S), Non-Western History

HIST 3250 - World in Conflict Since 1945

Credit(s): 3 Credits

How did the unresolved conflicts of the Cold War shape today's world? The Cold War, triggered by conflicts over how to reconstitute the European continent after the Second World War, quickly expanded to include China, Korea and eventually the entire globe. It was often not the superpowers but other nations like China, North Korea and Cuba that called the shots, even leading the world to the brink of nuclear war. These smaller nations were often embroiled in tangled religious, social or ethnic conflicts, and the superpowers' armaments and financial support, in turn, facilitated the growth of radical groups including radical Islamists in the Middle East.

Attributes: Foreign Service Elective, Modern European History, International Studies, International Studies-War

HIST 3260 - Modern France since 1815

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the major divide in French society that dated back to the French Revolution - the gulf between a republican and secularist vision of the French nation and the conservative, aristocratic, monarchical and Catholic vision. This course will show how the major conflagrations in French history - the 1848 Revolution, the Paris Commune, the Dreyfus Affair, the interwar tensions, the Vichy regime and the Algerian war - were informed by these tensions. This course will also underscore the role played by gender, religion, and social class.

Attributes: Modern European History

HIST 3280 - Russia to 1905

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course tells the story of Russia from its beginnings in 10th century Kiev to the Revolution of 1905: politics, religion, culture and the arts, economics, society, and foreign affairs. We will examine the central role of the Russian Orthodox Church, how autocratic rulers like Ivan IV, Peter I, and Catherine II made Russia a great multinational empire, and how 19th century Russia saw culture and learning flourish even amid growing opposition at home and abroad.

Attributes: Modern European History, International Studies-Europe

HIST 3290 - Russia Since 1905

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The tsar is dead. Long Live the tsar defeat by Japan and revolution in 1905, then World War I, Nicholas II and the Russian Empire fell in 1917. The Bolsheviks under Lenin seized power, enforced Communism in Russia, and sought world revolution. Stalin remade society, imposing a reign of terror. Despite horrendous losses in World War II, the USSR expanded and launched the Cold War. Khrushchev's and Gorbachev's reforms failed, and the Soviet Empire collapsed in 1989-1991. Yeltsin's chaotic rule meant greater freedom but also corruption. Starting in 2000, Putin reestablished authoritarian rule and reasserts Russia's role abroad.

Attributes: Foreign Service Elective, Modern European History, International Studies

HIST 3300 - Modern European Diplomatic History from 1815-1914

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will examine the diplomatic relations not only between European nations on the continent but between the great powers and the rest of the world. In focusing on European relations with the Americas, Africa and Asia, it will examine global trade routes, slavery, imperialism and empire building. It will conclude by examining the diplomatic breakdown that led to the First World War.

Attributes: Modern European History

HIST 3310 - Modern European Diplomatic History, 1914-Present

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will focus on European relations during the tumultuous 20th century. How and why did European states attempt to hold on to empires created in the 19th century or to create new continental and worldwide empires? Why did four major empires collapse in 1917/8? Why did almost all of the European states lose their vast empires after 1945? This course will survey the diplomatic relations in the interwar years, the Second World War, the Cold War, the era of decolonization, and finally the aftermath of the Soviet Union's imperial collapse.

Attributes: Foreign Service Elective, Modern European History

HIST 3320 - Early Modern History of Spain:1469-1818

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course focuses on the socio-cultural environment of early-modern Spain, recently united politically through the marriage of Isabel of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon and through the conquest of the Islamic kingdom of Granada. How did the Spanish monarchy and church attempt to forge a national identity on a land of diverse cultures and languages, in which three ethno-cultural groups (Christians, Jews and Muslims) coincided? How did the character and socio-religious landscape of early modern Spain change through its imperial conquests and continuous wars of religion?.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 3040

HIST 3330 - Modern History Spain:1808-Pres

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The altibajos of Spanish modernity. History of Spain from the French invasion to the present. Analysis of the nineteenth-century revolution, the First and Second Republics, the civil war, the Franco era and the democratic period from Adolfo Suarez to Jose Maria Aznar.

Attributes: Modern European History, International Studies

HIST 3340 - The Spanish Civil War

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The history of Spain as seen through its most important upheaval in modern times. The war is used as a focal point to concentrate on the various themes, trends and issues of modern Spanish history.

Attributes: Cultural Diversity in the EU, Modern European History

HIST 3350 - Plagues and Peoples: Disease and Society in the Pre-modern World

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the interaction between disease and human societies around the world from the outbreak of the plague in the fourteenth century to the alleviation of malaria in the nineteenth century. We will focus both on the ways in which contemporaries understood, and thus combated disease, as well as the broad effects of pandemics on peoples around the world. Topics in the course include: sickness and culture, the plague, transatlantic biological exchanges, medicine and magic, disease and industrialization, imperialism, and medical science.

Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, Pre-1600 European History, International Studies-Health, Medieval (Major) - History

HIST 3360 - English History: The Stuarts, 1603-1714

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the development of English society between the early seventeenth and the early eighteenth centuries, a time of tumultuous political, religious, social, and economic change. Particular issues addressed include: the changing social structure; households; local communities; gender roles; economic development; urbanization; religious change from the Reformation to the Act of Toleration; the Stuart monarchy; rebellion, popular protest and civil war; witchcraft; education, literacy and print culture; crime and the law; poverty and social welfare; the changing structures and dynamics of political participation and the emergence of parliamentary government.

Attributes: Modern European History

HIST 3370 - English History: The Industrial Revolution, 1714-1880

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Why are some countries rich and some countries poor? This is one of the most important questions facing contemporary societies. It was in Britain, that we can begin to find an answer to this question; it was here that the world's first industrial revolution took place. This course offers a history of the British industrial revolution, drawing on new perspectives and methodologies from the fields of economic and global history. The course explores issues such as foreign trade, consumerist and enlightened culture, population growth, and child labor, the social impact of the industrialization.

Attributes: Modern European History

HIST 3390 - Seeds of Empires: An Introduction to Food History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course examines the history of food in imperial/colonial societies from the medieval period to contemporary times. As an expression of culture, a sign of identity, and as an index of social and technological change, food stands at the junction of many contemporary concerns. Its history constitutes a new and exciting way to engage critically with issues related to international relations, environmental degradation, sustainability, public health, social inequalities, gender roles and diasporas. Students will familiarize themselves with historical problems such as the study of food diplomacy, imperial sciences and engineering, cultures of consumption, and cookbooks.

HIST 3420 - The Atlantic World

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The Atlantic World began to emerge early in the second millennium CE with increased interaction between Europeans, Africans, and, later, Native Americans. This course will examine the social, cultural, political, economic, and military history of the Atlantic World through the 1830s. There are no prerequisites or co-requisites for the course.

HIST 3430 - African Economic History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Surveys the varied heritage of African economies as well as performance from the pre-colonial period to the present. Includes agriculture, trade, urbanization, mining and industrialization. Impact of these economic activities on population and environment will be examined.

Attributes: Non-Western History

HIST 3440 - Imperialism & Nationalism

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines European, Japanese, and American expansion into Asia and Africa beginning in the eighteenth century and the nationalist movements in Asia and Africa that led to decolonization from the 1940s to the 1970s. Special attention will be paid to newer scholarly approaches to imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism especially those that emphasize the role of culture and the struggle of indigenous peoples.

Attributes: Non-Western History

HIST 3450 - Colonial America

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores the social, cultural, and political developments in the British North American colonies from the first contact between indigenous and colonizing cultures to the eve of the American Revolution. The course is a thematic exploration into some of the most important historical problems during this era. Many of those problems remain central to the history of American life and culture'the origins of slavery; the origins of capitalism, consumerism, and religious revivalism; as well as the future of indigenous peoples amid a migrating and colonizing people of European ancestry.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3460 - Foundations of the American Republic, 1763-1816

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course covers the development of the new republic in the former British colonies of North America from the end of the French and Indian War to the settlement that ended the War of 1812. It focuses on the revolt against the British empire and the establishment of an independent constitutional government.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3480 - U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the American Civil War from its origins in the sectional conflict through Reconstruction. Topics include the institution of slavery; Union and Confederate society, politics, culture, war aims and leaders; race and emancipation; dissent and civil rights; the transition to free labor; and the war's lasting impact on American history.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3485 - U.S. CIVIL WAR and RECONSTRUCTION, 1850-1877

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Causes of the war; personalities; factors in the Northern victory; the war on the home front; reconstruction; experience of the freedmen.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 2005

Attributes: Upper-Division US History, Prof. Studies Students Only

HIST 3490 - The Gilded Age

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The rise of industrialism in the United States and the response of various institutions.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3500 - Progressive Era to the Jazz Age, 1890-1920

Credit(s): 3 Credits

What was progressive about the turn of the 20th century? What do we mean by the Jazz Age? During these years, the U.S. became the largest industrial power in the world. Accompanying its enormous economic power was an unprecedented economic, cultural and political transformation that led to extensive conflict.This course will examine urbanization, immigration and its backlash, racial tensions, explosive conflicts between labor and management, Prohibition, a new foreign policy designed to assert global power, and the establishment of a system of national parks equal to the size of France. The class will also examine leisure, music and film.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History, Diversity in the US (A&S)

HIST 3510 - Prosperity, Depression, and War 1920-1945

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines America's political, social, and international evolution from the end of World War I to the end of World War II. It was focus on such topics as the causes of the 1929 Depression, the New Deal and its impact on the federal government and presidency, and the diplomacy of World War II, culminating with President Harry Truman's decision to use the atomic bomb to end the war with Japan.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3520 - Contemporary America, 1945 - Present

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course focuses on the momentous events in U.S. history since World War II that have shaped American society today and the historical debates surrounding the interpretation of these episodes. Particular attention is given to the Cold War, Vietnam, the Civil Rights Movement, Watergate, 9/11 and the War on Terror.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3525 - Contemporary America, 1945 - Present

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The Cold War, civil rights, Vietnam, Watergate, the technological revolution and modern society.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 2005

Attributes: Upper-Division US History, Prof. Studies Students Only

HIST 3560 - U.S. Social and Intellectual History to 1861

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores the underlying ideas of American society and culture from the settlement of the colonies to the end of the ante-bellum period. It focuses on the leading thinkers, and places their ideas in the context of contemporary social relations and cultural patterns. Among the larger themes that will be considered are: Puritan vision, Enlightenment and republicanism, evangelical worldview, romanticism and reform, and the ideology of sectional differences.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3570 - U.S. Social and Intellectual History SINCE 1861

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines major movements in American thought from the Civil War through the present. Topics include the revolt against Victorianism and the old order, and the subsequent rise of pragmatism, progressivism, literary modernism, radical liberalism, political realism, dissent and protest, neo-conservatism, intellectuals in academe, the culture wars, and think tank intellectuals.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History, Urban Poverty - Applied

HIST 3580 - American Slavery

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the history of slavery in America from settlement through Reconstruction, in a comparative, trans-Atlantic context. Topics include the origin, character, and institutionalization of slavery in America; slave life, culture, and communities; slave resistance and rebellion; Black and white abolitionist movements; emancipation during the Civil War, and the transition from coerced to free labor during Reconstruction. Students will prepare a 20 page research paper based on primary and secondary sources.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History, Urban Poverty - Exclusion, Diversity in the US (A&S)

HIST 3590 - American Women

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course seeks to explore the ideas and experiences of women in the United States, from the 1600s through the end of the twentieth century. Our goal will be to understand not just what women have done but also how many fundamental moments and issues in US history ' including the formation of the early republic, religious revival movements, reform crusades, slavery, war and race relations ' have hinged on certain notions of gender. The course also gives attention to the experiences of less privileged women and women of color who have also had significant effects on shaping the American past.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History, Diversity in the US (A&S)

HIST 3600 - U.S. History in Film

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores the relationship between depictions of the American past in film and in historical scholarship. We will discuss film at three levels, bearing in mind that any film is a mirror of the times when it was made. First, as a reflection of objective, factual history. Second, as an interpretation of history. Third, as a means of promoting among the public the various agendas of the filmmakers. The aim of the course is to learn to identify and assess interpretations through film, as well as to understand how film has shaped the collective memory of our society.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3610 - Civil Rights in America, 1865-1965

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The course examines the hundred-year struggle to secure basic civil rights and civil liberties for African-Americans. Beginning with Reconstruction and ending with the modern Civil Rights Movement, this course examines the socio-economic, political and legal developments which brought about racial segregation and the institutional efforts to dismantle Jim Crow Society. Special attention will be given to the modern civil rights organizations such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the Congress for Racial Equality (CORE), the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), and the Students Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) which lead the civil rights struggle.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History, Urban Poverty - Applied, Urban Poverty - Exclusion

HIST 3630 - The Saint Louis Region

Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits

The history of St. Louis is extraordinarily rich in its ethnic, cultural, social, and economic diversity. Standing at the crossroads of America, St. Louis marked the gateway between the eastern United States and the western territories. This course will concentrate on the history and development of St. Louis and the wider geographic region of the middle West. The course readings will situate the life of the city within the context of western explorations, Jesuit history, the growth and eventual demise of slavery in Missouri, and western urban development.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3635 - The Saint Louis Region

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Examines the rich and varied heritage of St. Louis, its social, cultural, and intellectual dominance of the American Heartland, its contributions in business, religion, politics and the arts.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 2005

Attributes: Upper-Division US History, Prof. Studies Students Only

HIST 3640 - History of the American West

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will examine the U.S. West, focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries. It will survey themes of conquest and colonialism, migration and immigration, economic development and environmental change, resistance and accommodation. Students will study U.S. relations with the Sioux, Comanches, and Mexicans. Students will explore the changing definition of the West and the frontier in popular culture. They will study the emergence of Hollywood and Disneyland. Students will also trace historically significant demographic shifts, ranging from miners rushing into the California Gold fields, to Cold-War refugees fleeing Southeast Asia, to contemporary migrations from Mexico.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History, Diversity in the US (A&S)

HIST 3660 - North American Environmental History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Why do so many people feel at peace in the woods? Who supplies the meat for hamburgers? The course surveys the environmental history of what is now the United States from the fifteenth century to the present. Students will learn not only about changes in the American environment, but also about the ideological and political development of conservation, preservation, and environmentalism in the United States; the role of resources in economic and geographic expansion; transformations in the landscape; and ways in which some segments of the population have benefited from the control of nature at the expense of other groups.

Attributes: International Studies-Health

HIST 3680 - U.S. Economic History to 1865

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will examine the history of capitalism in the United States with a particular focus on the twentieth century. In addition to tracking important changes in the national economy, corporate structure, and business activity, we will explore the development of a capitalist economy, the rise of big business, consumption, the relationship between business and labor, and the changing role of business as a social and cultural institution in America. The overriding goal of this course is to engage with the history of American business enterprise and to think about how it has changed during the last two centuries.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3700 - U.S. Constitutional History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course explores the evolution of the U.S. Constitution in American political culture from its English roots to the present. Although students will examine the development of constitutional law and interpretations, the primary focus of the course is on the role of the Constitution in shaping American government, society, politics, and economy. Through primary and secondary readings, a class constitutional convention project, and a research paper, students will explore first-hand the meaning, creation and impact of the American Constitution in its historical context.

Attributes: Upper-Division US History

HIST 3710 - The Catholic Reformation

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course investigates the causes, course and consequences of a period that transformed Catholicism, and much of the world, from 1540 until 1750. Special attention will be paid to the revitalization of church organization, the emergence of new forms of religious expression, the role of gender in Catholic Christianity, the global expansion of Catholicism, the development of popular religion, and the rise of new religious orders, such as the Jesuits.

Attributes: Modern European History

HIST 3720 - Cultural Encounters 1500-1700

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the history of cross-cultural interactions and exchanges around the world from 1492 to mid-nineteenth century. The main focus will be on the encounters and creative adaptations between Europeans and indigenous peoples in Asia, Africa, and America. Our goal will be to gain an understanding how cultures change through contact with one another, and why such contacts involve both adaptations and resistance.

Attributes: Modern European History, International Studies

HIST 3730 - Daily Life in Early Mod Europe

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course focuses on the structures of everyday life in Europe from 1500 to 1800. Focusing on social history, the course is rooted in the conviction that the study of the routine activities and common beliefs and expectations of ordinary folk tell us a great deal about the way history was lived by most people. Topics include gender relations, family and community life, social organization, popular religion, and material culture.

Attributes: Modern European History, Italian Culture

HIST 3740 - The British Empire

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Survey of British empire from late eighteenth century to end of the twentieth century. Topics include: cultural and material foundations of empire; collaboration and resistance; dynamics of race, gender, and class, role of art and literature, new national and local identities; decolonization and independence, and contemporary legacies of empire.

HIST 3750 - Women in Modern Europe

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course surveys the history of European women from the Enlightenment to the present. In addition to restoring women's voices to history, we will examine well-known historical events from the perspective of women's history and examine the historical roots of issues and debates still informing the lives of European women.

Attributes: Modern European History

HIST 3760 - Medieval Spain

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course traces the history of the Iberian Peninsula from the end of the Roman Empire until 1492. Beginning with the Visigoths and ending with the Catholic kings, we look at the development of institutions and cultures shaping modern Spain. We will examine the interactions between Muslims, Christians and Jews, focusing on tolerance and intolerance. Entering our story will be El Cid, Santiago de Compostela, Almoravids and Almohads, saints and scholars, Las Navas de Tolosa and the Christian 'Reconquest', Dominicans and the Inquisition.

Attributes: Cultural Diversity in the EU, Middle East Studies, Medieval (Major) - History, Medieval (Minor) - History

HIST 3770 - History of the Jews in Spain

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course examines the history and culture of Jewish peoples in Spain during the Christian Reconquest of the peninsula, the formation of medieval kingdoms, and the final unification of Spain in the late 1400s. Special attention will be paid to the interaction (convivencia) between Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages and then growing persecution under the Spanish Inquisition to Jewish expulsion in 1492. Students take an analytical appraisal of Hispanic civilization, which will allow them to reassess and evaluate problems such as social diversity, identity and religious tolerance.

Attributes: Cultural Diversity in the EU, Middle East Studies

HIST 3800 - Autobiography and History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The autobiographical genre from St. Augustine's confessions to contemporary autobiography as literature and its relation to history.

Attributes: Pre-1600 European History

HIST 3820 - Islamic Middle East

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This is survey course of the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to 16th century. We will examine the rise of Islam, the early Islamic empire/caliphate and aftermath including the process of political fragmentation and cultural continuity in Muslim societies from Spain to North India. We will focus on political, intellectual and religious currents through an examination of primary texts.

Attributes: Foreign Service Elective, Non-Western History

HIST 3825 - Islamic Middle East

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This is survey course of the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to 16th century. We will examine the rise of Islam, the early Islamic empire/caliphate and aftermath including the process of political fragmentation and cultural continuity in Muslim societies from Spain to North India. We will focus on political, intellectual and religious currents through an examination of primary texts.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1905

Restrictions:

Enrollment limited to students in the Schl for Professional Studies college.

Attributes: Non-Western History, Prof. Studies Students Only

HIST 3830 - Modern Middle East

Credit(s): 3 Credits

The subject of this course is the history of the modern Middle East from the 17th century up to the present. The course will address political, social, and cultural history within the framework of an Islamic civilization and examine modern concerns such as nationalism, colonialism, statehood and impart of outside powers, and the response of the people of the Middle East to this challenge.

Attributes: Foreign Service Elective, Non-Western History

HIST 3910 - Internship

Credit(s): 1-6 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 3930 - Special Topics

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Various topical courses offered from time to time.

HIST 3980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 4200 - Contemporary History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

HIST 4900 - Seminar in European History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

A limited enrollment seminar exploring a specific topic in European history. Discussion format based on close reading of primary sources.

Attributes: Classical Humanities, International Studies

HIST 4901 - Sem: American History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatability up to 6 credits)

A limited enrollment seminar exploring a specific topic in American history. Discussion format based on close reading of primary sources.

HIST 4902 - Seminar in Non-Western History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

A limited enrollment seminar exploring a specific topic in Non-Western history. Discussion format based on close reading of primary sources.

HIST 4910 - Internship/History in Practice

Credit(s): 1-6 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

A practical application of history through an internship with an archive, library, museum, historical site or project.

HIST 4930 - Special Topics in History

Credit(s): 3-4 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Various topical courses offered from time to time.

HIST 4980 - Independent Study

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 4990 - History Senior Thesis Prep

Credit(s): 3 Credits

HIST 4991 - History Senior Thesis

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Writing an Honors Thesis (10,000 word minimum), based on a research paper for a previous 300-400 level history course. Must be recommended by the instructor for the previous course who will supervise the thesis with a second reader. Departmental honors for an 'A' grade. Prerequisite-GPA of 3.5 in history, 3.25 overall.

HIST 5000 - Theory & Practice of History: An Introduction

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course will examine some of the most influential theories of today's intellectual marketplace which affect the study of history. From historical materialism, through structuralism, semiotics, poststructuralism, postmodernism, and critical theory, to gender and narrative history, we will discuss their intellectual essence as well as their usefulness in terms of the insights they offer to the historian. Apart from reviewing various theoretical approaches, we will also discuss their applications by closely examining selected cases of scholarship on American history which employ them as tools of interpretation and as forms of writing about the past.

Attributes: Medieval Renaissance

HIST 5100 - Studies in Ancient History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This reading course presents a broad historiographical survey of major issues and interpretations of Ancient History.

HIST 5110 - Advanced Studies in Ancient History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

This is a reading course that provides an in-depth examination of specific topics in Ancient History. The topic of the course will vary from semester to semester.

HIST 5150 - Perspectives in Ancient History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatability up to 6 credits)

This course will allow graduate students, by contract, to enroll in an upper level undergraduate Ancient History course. The contract would require additional readings and/or a research project. Since this course number involves taking an undergraduate class for graduate credit, a student may register for this course no more than twice in his/her degree program.

HIST 5200 - Ancient & Byzantine History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

A general examination of the historiography and literature in late ancient and Byzantine history.

HIST 5210 - Advanced Ancient & Byzantine History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

An examination of the historiography and literature in specialized topics in late ancient and Byzantine history.

Attributes: Classical Humanities

HIST 5250 - Perspectives: Late Ancient and Byzantine History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Lectures and readings on historical events and wider trends in late ancient or Byzantine history.

HIST 5300 - Studies Medieval History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

An examination of the most important topics in medieval history including historiographic background, literature, and current trends. this course will acquaint the student with the work and thought of the leading scholars in medieval studies as well as differing perspectives.

HIST 5310 - Advanced Studies in Medieval History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

An examination of the historiography, literature, and current trends in specialized topics in Medieval history.

HIST 5350 - Perspectives in Medieval History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Lectures and readings on historical events and forces affecting specific periods in Medieval history.

Attributes: Medieval Renaissance

HIST 5400 - Studies in Early Modern European History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Study and discussion of secondary literature in Renaissance and Reformation (early Modern European) history.

HIST 5410 - Advanced Studies in Early Modern European History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Examination of the historiography, literature, and current trends in specialized topics in Renaissance/Reformation History.

HIST 5450 - Perspectives in Renaissance & Reformation History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Lectures and readings on events and forces affecting specific periods in Renaissance/Reformation history.

HIST 5500 - Studies in Modern European History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

An introduction to Modern European history from 1600 to the present. course offers students the opportunity to become acquainted with historiography, methods, and current debate in the specialty.

HIST 5510 - Advanced Studies in Modern European History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Examination of the historiography, literature, and current trends in specialized topics in Modern European history.

HIST 5550 - Perspectives in Modern European History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Lectures and readings on events and forces affecting specific periods in Modern European history.

HIST 5600 - Studies in American History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

An introduction to methodology and recent literature, and the study of United States history. Topics will range from colonial through contemporary American history.

HIST 5610 - Advanced Studies in American History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatability up to 15 credits)

Examination of the historiography, literature, and current trends in specialized topics in United States history.

HIST 5650 - Perspectives in American History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Lectures and readings on events and forces affecting specific periods in United States history.

HIST 5700 - Themes and Methods in World History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Themes and Methods in World History is designed to introduce students to the field of World History. Students will be familiarized with various theoretical and methodological approaches to World History as well as major debates within the field. Students will develop an understanding of the narrative outline of World History.

HIST 5710 - Advanced Studies in World History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

An elective in the MA program in World History, this course takes transregional and international units of analysis on historical topics that has comparative and/or cross-cultural dimension. Within the framework of the topic, students will become familiar with literatures, methodologies, and sources.

Restrictions:

Enrollment is limited to students with a major in History.

HIST 5800 - Race, Ethnicity and Culture Proseminar

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the key concepts, themes and methods of a historically-focused study of race, ethnicity, and culture in American life. General issues explored in the course include the cultural, historical, and demographic context of race and ethnicity in North America.

HIST 5900 - History Teaching Practicum

Credit(s): 0 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Required of all graduate teaching assistants, this course covers teaching methods, lecturing, and other topics necessary to prepare an effective teacher.

HIST 5930 - Special Topics in History

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 5970 - Research Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits

HIST 5980 - Graduate Reading Course

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 5990 - Thesis Research

Credit(s): 0-6 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 6800 - Seminar in Ancient & Byzantine History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

Advanced research on a specific topic in late ancient or Byzantine history. Introduction to source collections, library resources, and other research tools.

HIST 6810 - Seminar Medieval History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Advanced research in a specific topic in Medieval history. Introductions to essential source collections, library resources, source criticism, archival methods, paleography.

HIST 6820 - Seminar: Early Modern European History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

Introduction to research in Renaissance and Reformation Europe. Students become acquainted with research tools in Renaissance and Reformation history, to learn paleographic and codicological skills.

HIST 6830 - Seminar in Modern European History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

An opportunity to undertake advanced research, through primary and archival sources and secondary literature, in a specific area of Modern European history (1600 to the present).

HIST 6840 - Seminar in American History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatability up to 12 credits)

An introduction to advanced research in American history. Readings in secondary literature. Students will undertake research, using also primary and archival sources. Thematic and chronological topics.

HIST 6850 - Seminar in Ancient History

Credit(s): 3 Credits

This is a research seminar. Students will be required to produce a major paper based on original primary research.

HIST 6870 - Research Seminar in World History

Credit(s): 3 Credits (Repeatability up to 6 credits)

This research seminar in world history focuses on a particular theme of the instructor's choosing taken from the transregional, cross-cultural, and comparative dimensions of world history. The primary requirement of the course is a research paper (25 to 35 pages) based on primary and secondary sources that analyzes a topic within the thematic framework of the course. Other assignments aim to help students complete tasks essential to finishing the paper. The purposes of the course are to train students 1) in methodologies and sources 2) in producing research in world history. There are no prerequisites for the course.

HIST 6900 - Professional Writing for Historians I

Credit(s): 3 Credits

HIST 6900 is the first half (3 crs) of a two-semester course sequence designed to assist students in making the critical transition from being a student to becoming a scholar. The primary goals of the sequence are to orient students to professional expectations in the professorate and to develop a program of professional writing and dissertation research as efficiently and effectively as possible. More specifically, the courses aim to help students to conceptualize a dissertation, to fund a year of research from external sources, and to begin establishing a record of scholarship. As the first course in the sequence, HIST 6900 focuses on grant-writing and the dissertation prospectus, with the goal of having students submit at least one application for external funding and to finish the “problem section” of their prospectus. During the semester, the class also works on other professional development issues, such as networking and presenting conference papers. Offered every Fall.

HIST 6901 - Professional Writing for Historians II

Credit(s): 3 Credits

HIST 6901 is the second half (3 crs) of a two-semester course sequence designed to assist students in making the critical transition from being a student to becoming a scholar. The primary goals of the sequence are to orient students to professional expectations in the professorate and to develop a program of professional writing and dissertation research as efficiently and effectively as possible. More specifically, the courses aim to help students to conceptualize a dissertation, to fund a year of research from external sources, and to begin establishing a record of scholarship. As the second course in the sequence, HIST 6901 focuses on completion of the dissertation prospectus and article writing. Students are expected to revise fully at least one seminar paper they have written and submit it for publication to a reputable academic journal. During the semester, the class also takes up timely professional development issues, such as interviewing for jobs, writing a cover letter, and organizing a CV. Offered every Spring. Prerequisite: HIST 6900.

Prerequisite(s): HIST 6900

HIST 6930 - Special Topics in History

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 6970 - Research Topics

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 6980 - Graduate Reading Course

Credit(s): 1-3 Credits (Repeatable for credit)

HIST 6990 - Dissertation Research

Credit(s): 0-6 Credits (Repeatable for credit)